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SuperNet
Go Ninja,Go Ninja Go..
Premium
join:2002-10-08
Hoffman Estates, IL
kudos:5

Getting upset with puppy!

Hello All,

I know I made some threads about my puppy and I thank everyone for there input.
I have a couple of more questions..

1)He pee's in the house still, We take him out almopst every hour and 1/2 and he still pee's.. What can I do?

2) My puppy is attached to my GF, He follows her every where, I hold him and he gets up to sit lay on her, crys when she leaves and with me, jumps up to sit by her, sleeps by her and to me he thinks i am nothing. I give him a ton of treats too, i don't know what else to do..

3) He is still picking up rocks, wood chips and everything, I been trying to teach him the "leave it" command but he doesn't listen..

Edit: We just finished a 6 weeks puppy training class and he passed, so he is a smart dog.
Help?
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Chuck22
Premium
join:2003-11-10
Salt Lake City, UT
kudos:6

9 recommendations

Not to be facetious, but perhaps a 6-week human training class might be an idea.
--
amicitia sine fraude
(friendship without deceit)

Oedipus

join:2005-05-09
kudos:1

4 recommendations

reply to SuperNet
I recommend a cat, OP.


justin
..needs sleep
Australian
join:1999-05-28
kudos:15
Reviews:
·iiNet
reply to SuperNet
Puppies will bond with one person over another, it passes as they work out not everything good comes from one person. Don't bother plying him with treats to gain affection it is pointless.

I don't really think it matters that they pickup sticks and rocks etc on walks, they are a puppy and use their mouth to investigate. If you make a fuss each time you may inadvertently be rewarding them with "attention" making it worse. Only concentrate on removing the actually dangerous things quickly and without a fuss. If he hasn't learned "leave it", saying it over and over isn't going to help.

As for the peeing, I'd reluctantly suggest trying puppy pads and then moving them steadily towards the door, then outside the door, etc, then getting rid of them as fast as you can.


signmeuptoo
Bless you Howie
Premium
join:2001-11-22
NanoParticle
kudos:5
reply to SuperNet
My sister's Tennessee rescue dog was a major challenge. She still pees when she gets too excited, you can reach down to pet her and she will pee. We've solicited advice here and used what we were advised, including talking my sister and BIL into some of it (I referenced dog whisperers). Some dogs have a hard time learning a behavior, I now realize it can take a year or more. They're basically like a human without a very good IQ, some are neurotic, some are stubborn, others are insecure, you name it. It seems that you've got to be very very consistent, without any diversion.
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Join Teams Helix and Discovery. Rest in Peace, Leonard David Smith, my best friend, you are missed badly! Rest in peace, Pop, glad our last years were good. Please pray for Colin, he has ependymoma, a brain cancer, donate to a children's Hospital.

dmagerl
Premium
join:2007-08-06
Woodstock, IL
reply to SuperNet
A co-worker trained his puppy to pee on newspapers spread on the floor.

The puppy has long since grown up and to this day he cant sit on the floor and spread out the Sunday paper to read without the dog coming over and peeing on it.


La Luna
RIP Lisa
Premium
join:2001-07-12
Warwick, NY
kudos:3

6 recommendations

reply to SuperNet
Justin has it right.

My guess is that this puppy still doesn't know what he's being taken outside for. Are you consistently taking him to the same SPOT, everytime? Have you placed the scent of his poo/pee on that spot? Do you not turn pee/poo walks into play time? Do you let him roam all over when he's out? Again, small dogs are notoriously hard to potty train, this is not unusual. You could try the pee pad route to get him started. But that also requires your interaction so he learns he is supposed to go on them. You'll need to keep him confined in a smaller space, with the pads, ie, don't put the pads in the laundry room and then let him wander all over the house. If he hits the pad (or even close to it), praise and treat like you're an idiot. Seriously.

Stop being jealous of your puppy. He's a living, breathing animal, as such he makes decisions on who he bonds the closest too. Maybe your GF has a calmer demeanor that he gravitates to. You can't DEMAND that he sits by you. He's a dog, nothing to be jealous of. Some dogs prefer women over men for some reason too, who knows why. Trying to force him to come to you/sit by you will have the opposite effect.

Remove things from his mouth that would be harmful. Puppies explore with their mouths, they don't, after all, have thumbs. Remove the object and move him on. He will out grow this. He also might be teething, which would cause him to want to pick up/chew on things even more.
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The Alien in the White House

21,735 DEADLY TERROR ATTACKS SINCE 9/11


Jackorama

join:2008-05-23
Kingston, ON

2 edits

5 recommendations

reply to SuperNet
Here is your problem with your puppy peeing inside, you have him on your scheduled not his. If someone told you to pee when you don't have too, are you going to pee? No, of course not. You have to watch your puppy for signs of sniffing around looking for a spot and starting to squat. Then very quickly pick him up, run to the door and take him out. Put a puppy pad near the door and when he goes over to it and starts to look like he's looking for a spot to go on it, get to him fast and take him outside. You should only take him out for regular long walk time, maybe 2 times a day. The other times should be when he looks like he wants to go pee or you and your GF are spending time in the backyard.

As far as who your puppy likes to be with, each person offers something different to the puppy. You have to think of them like babies. When someone is holding a baby, they are cooing to them, kissing them, cuddling them, snuggling them, playing with them, etc. Puppies like that and it makes them feel secure and safe. If you are just sitting there with your puppy and not interacting with him, he is going to go to the person who does. If you are giving him the treats, then that is what he is only going to expect from you.

BTW, were you with your puppy at the training class or your GF? If your GF, then that maybe why he is not listing or following your command. He has been trained to follow your GF's commands. There are other puppy training classes after the first sessions. You might join the next level and make sure both you and your GF are there for the training so your puppy is trained to both of you.

Hope some of this helps. Good luck.

Edit: PS: What happens when you give a baby something new? They will put it in their mouth. Why? Because a baby's mouth has more nerve endings per square millimetre than any other part of their body. If a baby wants to know what something feels like they put it into their mouth. The same thing goes with a puppy.

--
"Whenever they invent something that's moron proof, someone comes by and invents a better moron."

"Ever stop to think, and forget to start again?"

"Those of you who think you know everything are annoying those of us who do."


guppy_fish
Premium
join:2003-12-09
Lakeland, FL
kudos:4

4 recommendations

reply to SuperNet
There is nothing wrong with the dog at all, the problems are else where ..

BlitzenZeus
Burnt Out Cynic
Premium
join:2000-01-13
kudos:4

1 recommendation

reply to SuperNet
No response at all? I've been waiting for you to at least respond to the others comments. If somebody kept making posts where they never made one response to them at all I'd just flat out ignore them. You were here seven minutes ago, and more than likely saw there were responses.

Either you've barely spent any time with the puppy in comparison, and/or it can sense you're not calm, otherwise it's possibly fearful of you. If you're frustrated, and angry it won't want to be around you. Do you think buying off a child with treats works? Here's a big hint, it doesn't.

If either of you lets the dog sleep on the bed with you stop it now. Patiently keep putting it down on the ground, and give it a bed of it's own. It has to learn it's not allowed on the bed, and if it is trying to compete for attention with you, if she doesn't push it away then it sees her as favoring him.
--
I distrust those people who know so well what god wants them to do because I notice it always coincides with their own desires- Susan B. Anthony
Yesterday we obeyed kings, and bent our necks before emperors. But today we kneel only to the truth- Kahlil G.


SuperNet
Go Ninja,Go Ninja Go..
Premium
join:2002-10-08
Hoffman Estates, IL
kudos:5
reply to SuperNet
I have been busy working to respond right away.

I spend a lot of time with my puppy, he takes most of my time off after work and on the weekends.

I take my puppy for walks everyday, and he normally goes potty in a couple areas, he refuses to go in the back yard or when i am not with him. I tried not taking him on walks to go potty and he just goes in the house.

I was with him at training class's, i was training him and my gf just watched most of the time.

Yes, he sleeps in his own bed next to ours, however it is level with the bed.. We tried to put him in his crate but he barks and crys.
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Bobby_Peru
Premium
join:2003-06-16

2 edits
Congratulations on your new puppy! There has been some good (and not so good advice) already given.
said by SuperNet:

...
I take my puppy for walks everyday, and he normally goes potty in a couple areas, he refuses to go in the back yard or when i am not with him. I tried not taking him on walks to go potty and he just goes in the house. ....

We tried to put him in his crate but he barks and crys.

These statements indicates _you_ need to revisit "The Puppy's Human 101" so that you can better, and timely, meet these, and other, challenges, yet to come.

Of course he does. That's his job. But, consider that _you_ are his human, and as his human, you can most easily enlighten him in this young stage of his life, to the desired behaviors that will best serve the three of you for, hopefully, many years to come.

Please do all three of you a big favor and check out at least a couple of training references, now.

One example is Pat Miller's "The Power of Positive Dog Training", which is a good place to start. It's a well organized, quick read, and if understood, and followed, will very quickly get all three of you on the right track.

There are other methods that do not use clickers, or treats (which if used, be sure to ease off as each new trick is mastered) but, regardless of the chosen method(s), _you_ must first learn what is required of you in this fun, exciting, rewarding endeavor. Good luck! Enjoy!!!! Good boy!

[EDIT: Expanded for clarity: " I take.....he just goes in the house." ]


justin
..needs sleep
Australian
join:1999-05-28
kudos:15
Reviews:
·iiNet
reply to SuperNet
I wouldn't stress about the crate training. I know some people swear by it, keeps the dog out of trouble, is their safe place, yada yada but lots of great dog owners don't crate their dogs and it isn't a problem they travel ok, etc. At the vet, or some kind of boarding place, it might annoy them not to have a dog that settles down in a cage, but you can have a dog for their lifetime and never or rarely have to deal with that.

Your challenge is the toilet training thing, and then you'll soon be facing how to stop them chewing on stuff that isn't a dog toy. One battle at a time, put all your efforts into the toilet thing otherwise you're going to hate your dog just because of what he is doing to your floors and then nothing will work out.


La Luna
RIP Lisa
Premium
join:2001-07-12
Warwick, NY
kudos:3
reply to SuperNet
Keep taking him ONLY to those "couple areas" where he goes for pottying, never to another area or a walk elsewhere. Stand there. Fun walks should be separate from potty outings.

Do NOT give him free run of the house until he is reliably potty trained! This is the biggest mistake people make housebreaking a puppy. In his mind, the whole house is one big potty place. Anywhere except where he sleeps. If you can't watch him like a hawk, he should be confined to a small space (kitchen, laundry room are good choices). YOU must watch him for signs he has to go. Very subtle signs. Circling, sniffing. They are fast, you must be quick to pick him up and place him outside in his potty spot. Most dogs will not pee when you pick them up. Even if you miss, pick him up, tell him "NO" and take him out to his spot. Every single time. Make sure you are cleaning those spots well or he will just go back to them.

Who takes care of this dog when you are "busy working"? Where is the dog when you aren't home, and how long is he left alone each day?

Crating is ok (some dogs love it and actually prefer to sleep/rest in their crate), but I think you've passed the point where he will accept that. He already knows if he cries and barks you will let him out. He won that battle.
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The Alien in the White House

21,735 DEADLY TERROR ATTACKS SINCE 9/11


SuperNet
Go Ninja,Go Ninja Go..
Premium
join:2002-10-08
Hoffman Estates, IL
kudos:5
reply to SuperNet
I really need some help guys/gals...

My puppy doesn't want to go to sleep at night, we put him in the crate and all he does is bark, bark bark.. Then we put him on a side table on his own bed and he is fine for couple hours and then jumps on our bed and keeps us up all night..

I don't know what to do, I am ready to pull my hair out! I can't work!

We do watch my puppy when we are busy like a hawk or put him in the crate.
We watch him and still pee's in the house when we are watching.. I don't get it, we take him out and he goes pee and 20 min later he pee's in the house.
[
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Badger3k
We Don't Need No Stinkin Badgers
Premium
join:2001-09-27
Franklin, OH

2 recommendations

He barks because he knows you are going to get him out. Put him in the crate, put a blanket or something over top so it covers the door and leave him there. Do it before you go to bed so hopefully he's done barking by the time you want to sleep otherwise invest in ear plugs or move him so you can't hear him.
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Carpie

join:2012-10-19
united state
kudos:5
Crate with the blanket over it and when he barks shake an aluminum can with coins in it. They don't like that sound and if they hear it everytime they bark, they'll learn to stop barking.

On the downside, if a home invader comes into your house in the middle of the night to give your stuffed animals a confused touch, Puppy may not bark and alert you of that either.
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Absolution -- MSV: 6/6 0/6H -- HoF: 4/6 -- ToES: 4/4 -- ToT: 12/12 -- SoO: 9/14F 8/14

Bobby_Peru
Premium
join:2003-06-16

4 edits

2 recommendations

reply to SuperNet

Misplaced Blame: Educate Yourself, Show Puppy Properly, Enjoy...

Hi SuperNet See Profile,

One more try. I do not mean to sound insulting, or demeaning, but if you do not understand what a puppy is, and is not capable of, and/or even the most basics of training (Operant, or otherwise), even if this community spends collectively tens to hundreds of hours trying to answer each of the myriad of challenges that arise with a puppy, you will always be behind, trying to catch up, and meanwhile, you are loosing valuable training time, and your puppy is learning more and more undesirable behaviors.

Your puppy's ability to hold urine is limited physiologically, but it increases as he/she matures.

Your puppy's understanding of the desirability (presently, just for you) to not pee in the house, and the desirability (again, presently, just for you) to pee were you want him/her to pee, is limited to your ability to properly convey this to her.

It's this simple: If you actually want to start solving these challenges _today_, then get, read, re-read, and follow a basic training book. As mentioned in my post above: One example is Pat Miller's "The Power of Positive Dog Training", which is a good place to start. It's a well organized, quick read, and if understood, and followed, will very quickly get all three of you on the right track. Amazon has the 2ed Edition.

The $15, $20, or so dollars spent today (or free at a library), will provide you with at least the most basic tools that you absolutely need to responsibly embark on this rewarding journey.

I _guarantee_ if you properly do this _before_ you teach your puppy more undesirable behavior (accidentally, or not), it will be the best move you can make for both you, and for your puppy, with both the highest immediate ROI (results starting in a couple days, at most), and long-term ROI.

$20 tops for the book (free at a library)

Optional, but extremely efficient and effective, when used properly (fast, repeatable, long-term results):
1) Clicker (marker) training: $5 for a clicker (get two, and a wrist band for them)

2) $20++ for lots and lots of tiny puppy training treats for positive reinforcement.
3) $5+ for a treat pouch

CAVEAT: When used properly, clicker (marker)/treat training gives fast results, but once the desired behavior is reliably achieved, decrease their use, and increase verbal, touch, and other positives.

Once you have at least some familiarity with the basics, then folks can certainly help you.

Or, keep typing, cleaning, and loosing sleep, typing, cleaning ...

Happy Tails! (hth)


Hayward
K A R - 1 2 0 C
Premium
join:2000-07-13
Key West, FL
kudos:1
reply to SuperNet

Re: Getting upset with puppy!

Sorry, just have to say it you should have gone Mut... they generally learn much faster, and are more healthy/low maintenance, and usually near or free up front to boot.
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Jackorama

join:2008-05-23
Kingston, ON
reply to SuperNet
Here's and old trick. Get a wind up alarm clock. Don't set the alarm, but wind it up and put it next to the crate. The tick tock sound may calm him down and get him to sleep.

You can get a cheap one at any department store. Make sure it has a loud enough sound, like the ones your grand parents had.

Also, after cleaning up his pee on your floors go over it with a mixture of vinegar and water. If you don't, he will still smell his scent in the area and pee there again.

If he is still peeing in the house when you are watching him, then you are not being fast enough getting to him. Even if he is mid pee, pick him up, tell him no and take out. It may get messy at times, but that is what you have to do.

Good Luck.
--
"Whenever they invent something that's moron proof, someone comes by and invents a better moron."

"Ever stop to think, and forget to start again?"

"Those of you who think you know everything are annoying those of us who do."


La Luna
RIP Lisa
Premium
join:2001-07-12
Warwick, NY
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to Hayward
said by Hayward:

Sorry, just have to say it you should have gone Mut... they generally learn much faster, and are more healthy/low maintenance, and usually near or free up front to boot.

Uh, that is utter and complete BS.

And even purebreds can be found for "free" if that's such a big deal. Do your homework.
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The Alien in the White House

21,735 DEADLY TERROR ATTACKS SINCE 9/11


La Luna
RIP Lisa
Premium
join:2001-07-12
Warwick, NY
kudos:3

4 recommendations

reply to SuperNet
Well, I've given up here. Seeing too much "I can't", "He won't". Just who is running the show here?

You haven't listened to a word anyone said, never mind implement any of the suggestions. IF THE DOG IS PEEING IN THE HOUSE, THAT IS AN OWNER PROBLEM, NOT A DOG PROBLEM.

"We watch him and still pee's in the house when we are watching....". REALLY? Is that what anyone said to do, sit there and WATCH HIM PEE?? If he has to pee 20mins later, TAKE HIM OUT AGAIN! SMALL DOG, SMALL BLADDER.

And you are still putting him in the crate now that he's learned you will take him out if he barks? Jumps on your bed? PUT HIM BACK ON HIS BED, OVER AND OVER IF NECESSARY.

I'm beginning to think you should just look to rehome this dog. You are not getting it. Would be better for you and more importantly, for the dog. I forget what breed he is, but look for a rescue for his breed to find a good match for him.

Sorry, but that's how I see this. It's going no where and the dog will suffer for it.
--
The Alien in the White House

21,735 DEADLY TERROR ATTACKS SINCE 9/11