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IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast

[HVAC] Range hood gone bad

Was noticing a burning smell this morning and the fan on the range hood was running, turned it off, smell went away. I put a piece of tape over the switch to scream out of order fire hazard.

Does this mean the range hood has gone bad. It's one of those that vents into the kitchen. Also if I were to replace it with one of those with a microwave build in, does that require the cabinets to be higher. Otherwise, I might just see if I can get a scratch and dent special at the Sears Lowe's Depot since we're dealing with a rental.

This is one of those that vents back into the kitchen.

The stove is mine, the one provided by the landlord was absolutely positively a piece of junk.

We're dealing with the typical don't bother me unless it's to pay the rent type landlords.
--
I've experienced ImOn (when they were McLeod USA), Mediacom, Comcast, and Time Warner and I currently have DirecTV. They are much better than broadcast TV.

I have not and will not cut the cord.


OTguy

@ccra-adrc.gc.ca
Here there is a minimum distance above a stove that must be kept clear. I want to say 31", but I am not sure. You would have to check your local bulding code to find that information.

Then you would need to measure to ensure that the bottom of the microwave range hood when installed is above that minimum height.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

3 recommendations

reply to IowaCowboy
said by IowaCowboy:

We're dealing with the typical don't bother me unless it's to pay the rent type landlords.

I thought you had a great landlord that reimbursed you for your handiwork keeping your apartment repaired? Something change? He/She not so accessible now?

Call your landlord and tell him/her the range hood needs to be replaced.


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to IowaCowboy
You probably prevented a fire !
Expand your moderator at work


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to Jack_in_VA

Re: [HVAC] Range hood gone bad

I think she is getting fed up with all the work that the unit needs. The last thing I need is for her to sell it and for us to be forced out.

I've been doing small repairs and not even bother seeking reimbursement.

Let's look at some of the things that have failed in 2013 (not everything is included). These are all failures and not upgrades.

1. Upstairs toilet flange
2. Downstairs toilet flange
3. Downstairs lavatory faucet
4. Downstairs lavatory drain
5. Upstairs lavatory drain
6. Kitchen baseboard heater
7. Upstairs smoke detector
8. Hall light fixture
9. Back porch light fixture
10. Front porch light fixture
11. Several outlets and switches
12. Upstairs toilet flapper and fill valve

And stuff that needs to be done
1. Range hood
2. Back door replacement
--
I've experienced ImOn (when they were McLeod USA), Mediacom, Comcast, and Time Warner and I currently have DirecTV. They are much better than broadcast TV.

I have not and will not cut the cord.


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
All those are just things that come with owning rental properties. None of them look like they are a big deal. If that's all I had to contend with, I'd be a happy camper.
I'd never EVER let a tenant do the things you do for your landlord. First of all, it's not their job. Second, there is a huge liability issue.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
reply to IowaCowboy
said by IowaCowboy:

These are all failures...

That's called wear and tear. Parts-wise, that's ~$100 in material...

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

1 edit
reply to Anon
(edited for housecleaning purposes)

said by IowaCowboy:

Was noticing a burning smell this morning and the fan on the range hood was running, turned it off, smell went away. I put a piece of tape over the switch to scream out of order fire hazard.

Does this mean the range hood has gone bad.

OP -- yes, if you have a burning smell and you turned it off and it went away then there is a problem. While it may be repairable, my experience with old range hoods is that they are full of grease and it takes longer to clean them before you can work on them than they are worth.

TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
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Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel
reply to IowaCowboy
said by IowaCowboy:

This is one of those that vents back into the kitchen.

Assuming you're talking about one of those range hoods with nothing other than an aluminum mesh filter, they're utterly useless if all they do is recirculate the air. At best, it might remove a small fraction of grease out the air.

I lived for a while at a place that had a similar range hood. I never used it, as it accomplished absolutely nothing other than creating noise.

Unless you intend on replacing it with one that has a more effective filtration system, or piping it into a proper outside vent, I wouldn't even bother. Just leave it off and don't use it. Let the landlord deal with it.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to IowaCowboy
said by IowaCowboy:

Also if I were to replace it with one of those with a microwave build in, does that require the cabinets to be higher.

Unless someone can quote with a code reference, I don't believe that micro-hoods have a specific code requirement. I would read the manufacturers installation instructions for information regarding the specific micro-hood you are interested in installing. They should give a minimum clearance to the cooking surface.


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada

1 edit
said by robbin:

Unless someone can quote with a code reference, I don't believe that micro-hoods have a specific code requirement. I would read the manufacturers installation instructions for information regarding the specific micro-hood you are interested in installing. They should give a minimum clearance to the cooking surface.

I don't know US codes, or IBC - but under Canadian codes, there must be 18" just over 24" clearance above an electric cook top, and 24" above a gas one.

EDIT - My bad - I should double check before I post - code doesn't differentiate between gas or electric - it's 650mm (25.5") for either...

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
Reference please


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
Ontario Building Code - 9.10.22.2 - Vertical Clearances Above Ranges

9.10.22.2. Vertical Clearances above Ranges

(1) Except as provided in Sentence (2), framing, finishes and cabinetry installed directly above the location of the range shall be not less than 750 mm above the level of range burners or elements.

(2) The vertical clearance described in Sentence (1) for framing, finishes and cabinets located directly above the location of the range is permitted to be reduced to 600 mm above the level of the elements or burners provided the framing, finishes and cabinets,

(a) are noncombustible, or

(b) are protected by,

(i) asbestos millboard not less than 6 mm thick, covered with sheet metal not less than 0.33 mm thick, or

(ii) a metal hood with a 125 mm projection beyond the framing, finishes and cabinets.

I was a little off with my clearances from memory - 750mm is roughly 30" - 650mm is about 25 1/2".

So for an approved, classified non-combustable OTR microwave, Ontario Building code says 25 1/5" clearance....

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
That code reference appears to me to be in relation to the framing and building of the cabinets. 30" is normal for the US also -- but that is not the clearance to the bottom of the microwave. That 30" measurement is the clearance to the underside of the cabinet above the stove which the micro-hood will mount to. I can't find any code which refers to the bottom of the micro-hood. At least in the US, I think the hood being a UL listed device, the rules fall back to manufacturers installation instructions.


cybersaga

join:2011-12-19
Welland, ON
A microwave or any other kind of range hood would fall under "finishes" when it says "framing, finishes and cabinets located directly above the location of the range".


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
said by cybersaga:

A microwave or any other kind of range hood would fall under "finishes" when it says "framing, finishes and cabinets located directly above the location of the range".

Correct - 750mm to the bottom of anything wood or combustible. 650 mm to the bottom of anything considered non-combustible; such as your range hood, OTR Microwave, metal plate, asbestos plate, etc...

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
I sincerely doubt that a microwave is considered a cabinet finish. I would expect to see something more like this which is from the IRC.

"SECTION M1504 INSTALLATION OF MICROWAVE OVENS

M1504.1 Installation of a microwave oven over a cooking appliance.
The installation of a listed and labeled cooking appliance or microwave oven over a listed and labeled cooking appliance shall conform to the terms of the upper appliance’s listing and label and the manufacturer’s installation instructions. The microwave oven shall conform to UL 923."

»publicecodes.cyberregs.com/icod/···c004.htm


cybersaga

join:2011-12-19
Welland, ON
said by robbin:

I sincerely doubt that a microwave is considered a cabinet finish.

The code doesn't say "cabinet finish", it says "finishes".

"Finishes" are anything you put there to finish the space. Basically, anything you put there before you call it finished.

That's for Ontario anyway. In that international code you link to, it's true it does not give a hard minimum and that the manufacturer instructions can allow for less than 30", if it's an appliance that is "listed and labelled". I assume that means UL listed. UL may give guidelines on what the minimum clearance must be, but they don't give their specs away for free it seems.


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to robbin
It's been tested in court up here; and the Building Code includes OTR Microwaves within it's definition for clearance; furthermore, the court ruled that even though the OBC's clearance requirement was in excess of what the manufacturer said was required, the code shall be followed.

And I fat-fingered - it's 600mm, not 650 - which is about 24" - thanks for catching that...


cybersaga

join:2011-12-19
Welland, ON

1 recommendation

I found the UL section posted online (pdf). The relevant section says this:
quote:
67.5 The installation instructions provided with an appliance that may be installed above a range or
cooktop shall specify the minimum spacing between the appliance and the range or cooktop necessary to
prevent the attainment of temperatures higher than speci%uFB01ed in 36.1.1.
And 36.1.1 gives the rules about the temperatures.

So yes, since Massachusetts uses the international code, has none of their own relevant amendments, and UL doesn't have a hard rule, then for the OP it is totally up to the manufacturer's installation instructions.