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Drex
Beer...The other white meat.
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join:2000-02-24
Not There
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[Plumbing] Improve Water Pressure

Backstory:
Bought a home that was in foreclosure. Renovated it over the course of 3+ months. The hot water heater was located in the attic and due to its size, I had a new one installed in the garage. Much better location IMHO.

Problem:
The water pressure on the far side of the house is lacking especially when it comes to hot water. The distance is probably 40'-50' to that bathroom from the hot water heater. Water pressure in the master bath is adequate as it's on the same side of the house.

Is there a way for me to increase the water pressure to the guest bathroom? I'm no expert in plumbing so most likely would hire a plumber to resolve. First wanted to know if it's feasible even.
--
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shdesigns
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join:2000-12-01
Stone Mountain, GA
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Sounds like you are talking more about flow than pressure.

Increasing the pressure would increase flow on all faucets. You could have the pressure measured or get a pressure gauge. If there is a pressure regulator, it could be increased a bit.

Otherwise, if they ran 1/2" pipe, increasing to 3/4 might help. I'd also look to see if shower heads or valves are plugged up.
--
Scott Henion

Embedded Systems Consultant,
SHDesigns home - DIY Welder



HotWater

@rr.com

Common occurrence.

As was mentioned you just need a bigger pipe.

Also remember, it will take a noticable amount of time for the hot water to travel the 50'.



hmm

@videotron.ca
reply to Drex

I can't speak for the states, but here where I am older homes had incoming copper pipes at 5/8's And the run from the shut-off (where the water comes into the home from the city) to the hotwater tank was normally the same, 5/8th's.

What people do to increase pressure is get an adapter and change the run from the shut-off to the hot water tank to 3/4 (which is today's standard here for both interior and incoming from the city).

If the pressure isn't enough, here we can call the city to increase it. Takes a whole 2 minutes to do (or you do it yourself if you have the tool, but you aren't supposed to).

That's about the only thing I can think of to equalize pressure, or rather, the only thing I have seen done.



Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to Drex

You guys are mixing up pressure and flow! Increasing the size of the pipe will not give you more pressure, it will only give you more flow. The only way to truly increase pressure is to put in a booster pump or change the pressure regulator setting.

That being said, if the faucet where your have the problem is a high flow application it may appear like you have low-pressure because the flow isn't keeping up with the demand. A much simpler solution would be to use a faucet (or showerhead) with a flow restrictor which would allow a stronger stream. If how long it takes to get hot water becomes a problem can easily install a circulating loo. P



cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to Drex

50ft shouldn't cause a significant drop in flow, even with 1/2" pipe... well unless the pressure is very low to start with. I would check the shut-off valves first.
A quick calculator shows a drop of only 4psi for 1/2" pipe 50ft long with a flow rate of 2.5gpm


iknow_t

join:2012-05-03

said by cowboyro:

50ft shouldn't cause a significant drop in flow, even with 1/2" pipe... well unless the pressure is very low to start with. I would check the shut-off valves first.
A quick calculator shows a drop of only 4psi for 1/2" pipe 50ft long with a flow rate of 2.5gpm

for a straight pipe, with no 90's, and no one else using water? my friends house has 1/2" all over, and if someone is using a shower, and someone else uses water elsewhere in the house, you get a blast of cold water..


tschmidt
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join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
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1 edit
reply to Drex

How are you measuring water pressure? As others have posted sounds more like a flow rate problem.

1) First thing I'd check is the strainers on all faucets and shower head.

2) Does the house have any kind of filtration equipment or water softener? Problems there will affect all appliances. But the longer the run the worse the issue.

3) Are you on city water of town? If you have your own pump it is a simple matter to adjust the pressure switch to increase pressure. Keep in mind the pressure gauge and pressure switch may be plugged or the pressure tank water logged. Check that before you mess with changing pressure

4) If you are on city water is there a pressure reducer near the meter?

5) As other have posted increasing pipe size increases flow but 1/2" pipe should be fine for single room.

/tom



Drex
Beer...The other white meat.
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1 recommendation

Thanks everyone for your input and suggestions.

I haven't measured the pressure, so maybe it is a flow issue. All showerheads and faucets are brand new. I don't have any filtration or water softening equipment.

I believe with the information everyone has provided, that I need to do a little more investigation as to exactly what my problem might be (pressure vs flow).
--
I'm actually not funny, I'm just really mean and people think I'm joking.



nightdesigns
Gone missing, back soon
Premium
join:2002-05-31
AZ
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·CenturyLink
reply to Drex

Make sure it isn't the shower head. Try removing the head and turning on the faucet.

I just moved into a brand new house and the builder provided heads left a lot to be desired. My preferred one is a $7 one from wally world. Swapped that out and its much better.
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