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Owlhoot

join:2013-11-29

Hughnet router and Netgear HELP PLS!

I have been reading this Link: Connect the hughnet router with a netgear router
»How Do You Network Your Home System

And found it very helpful but like to clarify a few things:

Donnie said:
LAN IP Setup netgear

IP: 192.168.10.1
Starting IP: 192.168.10.2
Ending IP: 192.168.10.51

So do I need to change something on my netgear router under these settings? Or just leave it?

To change router IP for netgear that will be under LAN TCP/IP setup?

How about double nat? Donnie stated:
router should be set to act as a DHCP server. Sure you can always just plug and go, I even did that at first. However, what will happen over time is you will gradually start to notice that more and more conenctions are dropped, you will have to reset more, and you will get some DNS errors. All this is due the HughesNet modem performed the same functions as the router, so essentially they are doing double work fighting with each other, slowing down your network and diminishing the quality.

But if I enable DHCP on netgear would that cause problems then? Or does Donnie mean if you just plug your router into the modem then this will cause problems?

If I turn of DHCP in netgear what will happen? What features will I not be able to use? Firewall? Tob said it makes his dlink unstable how does that happen? Why does DHCP need to be enabled on the netgear router?

I also been reading that at times users cannot gain access to the modem by typing the IP address in their web browser. Has this got to do with a firewall or some setting they have set? They an log in to the router but not to the modem router.

Anyway so if I follow top post by tobicat then I should encounter any issues?

The modem router works just by its own with the comp so now wanting a net gear router behind it.

Thanks for helping!!



gwalk
Premium
join:2005-07-27
West Mich.

I am on Gen4 with a netgear router.
Don't run the router software. Enable dhcp in the router.

Connect the modem to the routers WAN port, connect your hardwired computers to the routers LAN.ports.
Change the routets default user and password. Enable your choice of wireless encrption

You may wish to disable IPv6 in windows networking

The reason some folks have issues seeing the modems SCC is that 192.168.0.1 must be reserved for the modem.
Some routers default to that address.
I'm no expert on this but my netgear by default used a different address. Most hatdware brands keep a certain. Style.


Owlhoot

join:2013-11-29

2 edits

Hi gwalk thanks for tip: I will followed what the link said and let you know if any issues.

Is the normal default IP address for netgear is 192.168.0.1? And is this to IP address of the HUghnet modem also?

My netgear supports Ipv6 so do I just leave this alone and only enable ipv4? Ipv6 is more secure I heard?

So I won't have problems with my netgear router? Just change Ip and done?

How about RIP direction and RIP version leave it as it is?

Once IP address has been changed do I need reset netgear router?

Enable DHCP on Netgear router?

still like to know about the above questions if anyone knows...

Thanks!!

Thanks about the issue with modem



gwalk
Premium
join:2005-07-27
West Mich.

In my experience, the normal default IP for a Netgear router is NOT 192.168.0.1.

192.168.0.1 IS the default IP address of the Hughes Modem and it cannot be changed.

If your Netgear router supports IPv6 leave it enabled both in the router and in Windows networking.

You should not have to change the IP of the router (unless of course netgear has changed something). In the event that you did have to change it, it seems to me that then "resetting" the router would undo what you just did.

I am not familiar with RIP, post the model and revision number of your router and I'll take a peek at the manual.

Yes, enable DHCP on the router.


Owlhoot

join:2013-11-29

IP address of router of Netgear needs to be change. This is of course if the hughnet router is also 192.168.0.1.That is what I have been reading.

The above link i posted will show you why:
»How Do You Network Your Home System

Not changing the hugh modem router that remains un change its the netgear router that needs changing if both IP are the same.

How about starting IP address and ending IP address leave it as default or change it?

I have the manual and well i think i should leave it unless required.

Just so I don't get confused when you say router do you mean netgear router? Cause the hughnet is also a router.

Thanks again.

RIP Means: RIP Direction. Router Information Protocol (RIP) allows a router to exchange routing information with other routers. This setting controls how the router sends and receives RIP packets. Both is the default setting. With the Both or Out Only setting, the router broadcasts its routing table periodically. With the Both or In Only setting, the router incorporates the RIP information that it receives.

RIP Version. This setting controls the format and the broadcasting method of the RIP
packets that the router sends. It recognizes both formats when receiving. By default, the RIP function is disabled.


laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas

I haven't read that link but as gwalk says the HN modem reserves 0.xxx for itself, so you need to manually set your Netgear to another address--I use 192.158.1.1--and all your Netgear-connected devices are thus 192.168.1.xxx and you can let the Netgear run DHCP or you can set static IPs or a combination.

Note of course the HN modem is plugged to your WAN on the Netgear.
--
Gen4 Power Plan Jupiter HT1100 v3.0.0.30 Signal Strength Typical 125+



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

said by laserfan:

I use 192.158.1.1

That is a typo - should be 192.168.1.1

Netgear and D-Link are the two companies that use 192.168.0.1 for most of their routers, and that number must be changed. You can use anything from 1 to 254 for the third number. Leave the 192, 168, and final 1 the same.

Note that we are talking about the LAN side of the router, which provides DHCP to the computers on the network. The internet side of the router will pick up a 192.168.0.x address from the modem.

There is NO problem with double-nat, triple-nat, or any other multiple of nat, so long as the addresses do not conflict. If they conflict you will have problems worse than slowing down - I don't know what the author of the article that suggested double-natting would gradually slow was talking about. I am always, at a minimum, double-natted, and the network I'm typing this from is triple-natted.
--
Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool traveling in a 2004 Blue Bird M380


gwalk
Premium
join:2005-07-27
West Mich.
reply to Owlhoot

Click for full size
Connect a cable between the Hughes Modem and the Netgear Router WAN port.

Connect a cable between your computer and one of the Netgear Router LAN ports.

Plug in the AC power to the Hughes Modem and let it fully boot up (2 minutes ?)

When the Modem is fully booted, plug in the AC power for the Netgear Router and let it fully boot up. (2 minutes ?)

Start your computer.

Open a browser, in the address bar enter:

192.168.0.1

If all is well, you should be looking at the Hughes Modems SCC (System Control Center)

There are really only two settings in SCC that you can (or should)
change:

Web Acceleration enable/disable

MBX Reset

Next, again open a browser, in the address bar enter:

192.168.1.1

See if this ended up as the default address for the Netgear Router login page.

I looked at my Netgear Routers settings, see snip:


dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

Looking around on Google, the WNR2000 is one Netgear that uses 192.168.1.1, but it appears to be in the minority for Netgear routers. If the OP had mentioned model we could tell 'em exactly instead of guessing.
--
Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool traveling in a 2004 Blue Bird M380



gwalk
Premium
join:2005-07-27
West Mich.

It would have helped as things do change. I did ask the OP to post the model and revision # so I could peek at manual but he chose not to share that.

I dread to think of the path ahead of him wading through the confusing array of multiple usage meters and multiple usage history pages as he tries to stay within and understand plan limits.
I have Power Pro 15/15 Gb, that's only 500 Mb per day Anytime Bytes.

Don, with the uploads counting, a persistant clock error and some Phantom Usage it is drasticly different than the 6000 & 7000 days.


Owlhoot

join:2013-11-29

sorry gwalk Owl a bit forgetful!

Model WNDR4300
Version - Firmware Version 1.0.1.42


Owlhoot

join:2013-11-29
reply to laserfan

said by laserfan:

I haven't read that link but as gwalk says the HN modem reserves 0.xxx for itself, so you need to manually set your Netgear to another address

Yup that was what I was explaning I thought gwalk said do not change your netgear router IP.

THanks gwalk for the pic I got that already from the manual. And from previous link. But thanks for showing me..

I know it should be easy but thinks can get ugly from what I read: So if all this is really easy for you well remember not everyone is exp in this like me. But when I setup it up then i will know what to do after on.

Gwalk did you change yours from 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.1.1? I think you did.

Could you explain what is SCC? MBX? Are those on the netgear router?

Default IP on manual is: 192.168.1.1 So will have to see if this is what it is when I load it.

I dread to think of the path ahead of him wading through the confusing array of multiple usage meters and multiple usage history pages as he tries to stay within and understand plan limits.I have Power Pro 15/15 Gb, that's only 500 Mb per day Anytime Bytes.

Don't dread too much just read the manual and It all be clear! I don't need this anyway since my netgear can't cap the limit. And my ISP providers that for me. So your right be making life difficult trying to wade through the confusing array of multiple usage meters settings.

Since I am an old timer....so pls be nice...

Thanks Mr Bird!

If I plug out the N router and just plug back the hugnet router into the comp everything will be okay? Like if I don't want to use the N router? And if i plug back both routers again I don't need to change any settings

Thanks again everyone!



gwalk
Premium
join:2005-07-27
West Mich.
reply to Owlhoot

I think you may be over thinking the problem.
Just follow the procedure I outlined that starts with the text just below picture.

When you get hooked up, come back and I'll go over scc and such.
And don't look at the hughes modem as a router. It is a modem. The netgear is a router.



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5
reply to Owlhoot

said by Owlhoot:

If I plug out the N router and just plug back the hugnet router into the comp everything will be okay? Like if I don't want to use the N router?

Pretty much. The only thing that is likely to be required is to reboot your computer to pick up the changed IP each time you switch back-and-forth (there are other ways, but a reboot is often the easiest).
--
Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool traveling in a 2004 Blue Bird M380

Owlhoot

join:2013-11-29
reply to gwalk

I will get back sometime and let you know how it goes..

I was told that the hughe modem is a router too but will find out..

THanks again gwalk!

That is what tech do they need to make sure everything is correct.

THanks Mr Bird for that from Mr Owl.



gwalk
Premium
join:2005-07-27
West Mich.

Hi Owl,
Dont get hung up on it but Jackson Tech is a member here and at the Offical Hughes forum, read his FAQ here:

»jacksontech.net/index.php/articl···ing-faq/

In terms of conversation, its easier to think of the Hughes Modem as being a .... Modem.

Think of your Netgear Router as being a ... Router.

You seem a bit "timid" to approach this.

Are you unsure of what "plug" or "port" goes where ?

What need to be done or "proven" can be done in just minutes.

The Hughes Modem (do you have the HT1000 or the improved HT1100 ?) only has a single "Output", a RJ45 jack. It looks like a telephone jack but is a little larger.

Your Netgear Router has five (5) simular looking "plugs"

Four (4) are grouped together and are labled as LAN ports.

A single one, (the bottom one on back of Netgear router) is called a WAN (or Internet port) is trimmed in yellow or a gold color.

The "output" from the Hughes Modem is plugged into the Netgear Routers WAN port connection.

Your computers NIC (network interface card) has a RJ45 plug also.
Connect a cable from the computers NIC to one of the four LAN ports of the Netgear Router.

Start thing up in this order after connecting the cables.

Plug in the AC power for the Hughes Modem, lt it boot up all the way. (2 Min)

then

Plug in the AC power for the Netgear Router. Let it boot completely up so it gets a chance to meet and "talk* to the Hughes Modem on its own.

Start your computer, if its off.

Open an internet browser, Internet Explorer or whatever.

In the Browsers address window enter, with out "www" or anything

192.168.0.1

That is the IP address of the Hughes Modem. If you can see the Modems SCC (System Control Center) (this is the "internal webpage" of the Modem)

If you can "see" that, that means you can see "though" your Netgear Router.

If you cant see the SCC of the Hughes Modem, THEN and ONLY then do we need to concern outselves with having to manualy change the Netgear Router LAN address and range.

As I posted before, hook that Puppy up as described.

Check two simple addresses in a Browser:

192.168.0.1 should show the Hughes Modem "internal page"

192.168.1.1 (as a guess) should bring you to the Netgear Routers internal "Login" page.

If you get those results, we can carry on in securing your Network and a TON of info you will need for Hughes management.

If you DON"T get those results, then and only THEN do we have to dig deeper into Netgear Router settings.

What do you say ? Give it a try as outlined ? Have further Questions ?

You do realise, if you dont try to see if 192.168.0.1 leads to EITHER the Hughes Modem or the Netgear Router you will be in the same position. Try it.
It will lead us to Path #1 or Path #2.

As to being "up in years" I will be 65 myself in less than two weeks.



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

said by gwalk:

As to being "up in years" I will be 65 myself in less than two weeks.

And I will shortly be 67. I have a 92 year-old sister that started using computers at 80 and is a real whiz, so I don't personally think age is a barrier.
--
Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool traveling in a 2004 Blue Bird M380


gwalk
Premium
join:2005-07-27
West Mich.

1 edit
reply to Owlhoot

Owlhoot,

I typed this for another user but you may find the info useful as well:

#1
Usage Meter in SCC: (192.168.0.1)
Always available but limited to a displayed accuracy of .1 Gb or 100 Mb.
Far from being a "fine" enough readout to parcel out usage on the smaller plans.

#2
Download Usage Meter: (in downloads »my.hughesnet.com)
A nice little "companion" to the SCC meter, sits in your computers Notification Area.
It resolves to 1% increments, 1% of a 15 GB plan is 150 Mb. Just not fine enough for parceling out data on a daily basis. Or you may open the application and it will show to the nearest 100 Mb. Still not good enough for effective management.

#3
Traditional Hourly History Usage page:
Found under TOOLS/CHECK USAGE at »customercare.myhughesnet.com

A nice tool, but it is a History page, giving delayed, after the fact info that Rocky's answer tells me is totally useless in trying to track and control a subscribers usage.
The other big issue with it is, it is getting very rare that the page is accessible when you need it.

#4
The Histogram style Hourly History Usage display.
Found, if you are able to open the page, at »my.hughesnet.com

Totally useless, a pretty display of delayed usage divided into separate graphs of upload & download.

Again useless as a tool to help a subscriber monitor and control usage as the answer that Rocky passed onto me has shown.

#5
The "Usage At a Glance" Meter also found within the seldom accessible my.hughesnet.com webpage.

This is the meter that should be "native" to the usage display in SCC.

The big one here: Maybe the page where it resides will open and maybe it won't.

So you see folks, Hughes has set the whole thing up in such a way that there is no definitive way to understand, monitor & control your usage.

The following link leads to a Hughesnet webpage that describes all of the various aspects of a Gen4 plan.

»legal.hughesnet.com/FairAccessPolicyGen4.cfm

The problem with it is, as with so many other things Hughes related, one time it works, the next time it doesn't.


tobicat
Premium
join:2005-04-18
Tombstone, AZ

1 edit
reply to Owlhoot

Wow I was totally surprised to see people still reading instructions I posted years ago.

I kinda miss Hughes net sometimes. I still only have a 3000 down DSL line but I can download TV shows and movies all day long without a glitch.

And as long as we are talking about age I will be 72 tomorrow and I think I am pretty good with this computer stuff.