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clevere1
Premium
join:2002-01-06
Vancouver, WA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·CenturyLink

What finish to use on kitchen table?

Hi all,

I'm working on a real wood (no idea what kind, it's not a heavy table). I've stripped it of it's previous finish (thanks all for the help) and started light sanding today. But I was wondering, what type of finish should one use? I figured I would get a stain, no problem, but what type of top coat would be the best? I have 5 kids, so it has to be durable and take some abuse and cups not on cup holders. Ideas?
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dandelion
Premium,MVM
join:2003-04-29
Germantown, TN
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
Some woods will take more abuse then others. I am guessing it is either pine (not the softest but can be scratched and dented) or oak (slightly harder wood and more kid friendly.

Stain would look good and add a lot of coats of polyurethane/urethane. I have seen kitchen table last with this combination for a few years. No urethane coating though will last with wood and moisture forever and it will have to be redone eventually. Have you thought about other options that will allow more abuse such as a nice tile on the table?
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clevere1
Premium
join:2002-01-06
Vancouver, WA
kudos:1
Thanks. I like the look of real wood, so no tiles
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Where's th' DAFFY DUCK EXHIBIT??

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
Polyurethane or look at bar finishes.


rfhar
The World Sport, Played In Every Country
Premium
join:2001-03-26
Buicktown,Mi
reply to clevere1
My wife put a re-coat of Polyurethane on ours every year for several years. It went through the kids and now is going through the grand-kids.


clevere1
Premium
join:2002-01-06
Vancouver, WA
kudos:1
reply to clevere1
Thanks all. That is what I shall do.

Any tips for sanding round table legs?
--
Where's th' DAFFY DUCK EXHIBIT??


DataDoc
My avatar looks like me, if I was 2D.
Premium
join:2000-05-14
Martinsburg, WV
Use sanding sponges, they will conform to just about any shape/diameter.

Beezel

join:2008-12-15
Las Vegas, NV
said by DataDoc:

Use sanding sponges, they will conform to just about any shape/diameter.

+1


Kramer
Premium,Mod
join:2000-08-03
Richmond, VA
kudos:2
reply to clevere1
downloadtable.zip 6,022,593 bytes
More than 15 years ago I refinished a (I think) maple butcher block kitchen table with satin water based polyurethane. The water based products had just come out. I generally do not like water based finishes, but I have to say that one has held up. When you place a wet glass on it, a ring does form and then it just disappears when it dries. It just keeps going and going and looks great for its age. I am fairly sure it was Minwax and I think the finish is closer to 20 years old than 10. I probably put a half dozen coats on or more and sanded between each coat.

Water based finishes are great from a dangerous fumes perspective. If you are doing this in the home with closed windows, water based based is best way to go. Yes the water based products scratch more easily but with a light wood they are barely noticeable and add character in my opinion. I would highly recommend you not use a gloss finish, oil based or water, as after a few years of hard wear and tear, the scratches will be much more noticeable than with a satin finish. Attached are cell-phone pictures of the table full sized. Notice the scratches but not one water ring. I probably should refinish this table sometime in the next 5 years. The finish is showing signs of wear, but no bare wood is exposed as of yet.


Kramer
Premium,Mod
join:2000-08-03
Richmond, VA
kudos:2
PS: Another advantage of water based is that it does not darken the wood nearly as much as oil based polyurethane.