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inGearX
3.1415 9265

join:2000-06-11
New York

[Help] help - my Chrome has huge size even at startup and crashes ...

Click for full size
hmm I don't have any extensions ..

and it's latest Chrome ...

any ideas?

is this size normal? what about you?

any suggestions?

thank you..


natedj
Elected
Premium
join:2001-06-06
Columbia, SC

[Help] Re: help - my Chrome has huge size even at startup and crashes ...

The number of tabs open will affect the memory usage ... it also looks like you have multiple instances of Chrome open too.
--
Good judgement comes with experience...Experience comes after bad judgements



Buddel
If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
Premium
join:2004-03-06
EU
kudos:3
reply to inGearX

Maybe it helps to uninstall/reinstall Chrome. I don't know whether this behavior is normal or not because I don't use Chrome (and never will).



therube

join:2004-11-11
Randallstown, MD
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Verizon Online DSL
reply to inGearX

That is not "huge" at all.
AFAIK (I don't use Chrome) it lists one instance (in Task Manager) for each Window that is open?

Does Chrome have a "safe mode" opening method?
When does it crash?
During opening? Right after? After browsing for some time?


bennor
Premium
join:2006-07-22
New Haven, CT

1 recommendation

said by therube:

AFAIK (I don't use Chrome) it lists one instance (in Task Manager) for each Window that is open?

From what I've read about Chrome that's what it does. It runs things like extensions/add-ins, tabs, etc in separate instances which causes multiple entries in the Task Manager for Chrome.

This link: has a brief explanation.
»www.howtogeek.com/124218/why-doe···ocesses/
Google Chrome takes advantage of these properties and puts web apps and plug-ins in separate processes from the browser itself. This means that a rendering engine crash in one web app won’t affect the browser or other web apps. It means the OS can run web apps in parallel to increase their responsiveness, and it means the browser itself won’t lock up if a particular web app or plug-in stops responding. It also means we can run the rendering engine processes in a restrictive sandbox that helps limit the damage if an exploit does occur.

Basically, each tab has one process unless the tabs are from the same domain. The renderer has a process for itself. Each plug-in will have one and so will each extension that is active.
The following link details how you can find out more information about each instance of Chrome that is running.
»support.google.com/chrome/answer···22?hl=en
1. Click the Chrome menu in the browser toolbar.
2. Select Tools.
3. Select Task manager.
4. If you have an extension or app installed that uses a background page, you'll see an item in the dialog that appears labeled "Background Page".