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ArgMeMatey

join:2001-08-09
Milwaukee, WI
kudos:2
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Need ideas for 24" round concrete form, 3" tall

Seeking opinions on this project.

I need to pour a 2-3 inch tall, 24" diameter platform for a water heater that will sit on a sloping basement floor. That means the form will need to be trimmable so I can level it.

I could buy a 3 foot tall sonotube, but that seems like a waste of money.

Regular corrugated cardboard seems like it might get saturated and burst open unless I double it or better and line it carefully with plastic.

Other options I thought about:

Masonite, harder to trim, not sure if it would be practical to curve the Masonite that tightly.

Pressboard backing such as from a RTA bookshelf. Not sure if that's strong enough.

Plastic lawn edging. I have a roll in the garage, but ... there must be some reason I've never seen plastic used for forms. Not that I've paid attention to a lot of concrete work.
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tp0d
yabbazooie
Premium
join:2001-02-13
Carnegie, PA
kudos:6

2 recommendations

I admire your strive to make it match the circular heater, but whats wrong with a square pad? Much easier to make fursure

-j
--
if it aint broke, tweak it!!
currently on FiOS (kick aZZ!)


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to ArgMeMatey
Why not use a wedge to level the water heater?


ArgMeMatey

join:2001-08-09
Milwaukee, WI
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reply to tp0d
said by tp0d:

whats wrong with a square pad? Much easier to make fursure

-j

I can do square. I'm just trying to save on concrete; I might need a third bag for the added volume. But seriously, no good reason.

said by cowboyro:

Why not use a wedge to level the water heater?

Good question. The plumber had put the old heater on three concrete blocks and steel shims under each of three feet. Cheap and effective, but I hated the fact that when I was changing the anode rod I had to be very careful not to twist the whole setup lest it all come crashing down. I realize it would be bad enough twisting the pipes, but who needs a 500-lb cylinder falling over as well? Of course the new heater has no anode rod to change, but I like to do things the hard way anyway.
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Cho Baka
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-23
there
kudos:2
reply to Anon

Re: Need ideas for 24" round concrete form, 3" tall

Offensive.
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cwnorris

join:2000-01-17
Longmont, CO
reply to ArgMeMatey

Re: Need ideas for 24" round concrete form, 3" tall

I would use the lawn edging. Overlap at 24" diameter, drill a couple holes and wire it together, top and bottom. Place that area in the back where it's not seen. Pour, let cure, cut the wires, remove form. Just have to fill form carefully to keep circular shape.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to ArgMeMatey
You really don't have to level it. Just set the form and then when you pour, level the pour inside the form. Take the form off while it is still green and touch it up with a sand mix and at the same time correct any lack of vertical of the pour with that. Hope that makes sense -- it does to me but I have experience.
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natedj
Elected
Premium
join:2001-06-06
Columbia, SC
reply to ArgMeMatey

Re: Need ideas for 24" round concrete form, 3" tall

For the life of me I think that you're over analyzing this. But I'll play.

Why not get some landscape edging that you could roll into the diameter you want and use it as a form.
or, get some 1" thick styrofoam, maybe 2 or 3 sheets so you can stack them together for the desired height, cut your 24" diameter hole in it and you have an instant form.
or, go to the dump and find an old water heater, take a saw-all to it and presto, instant form.

I'll be on the lookout for the next thread on here that says "We went tankless, need to remove concrete pedestal in basement"
--
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nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12

1 recommendation

reply to ArgMeMatey
»www.homedepot.com/p/t/100343499# and a small bucket of grout to level it.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.


natedj
Elected
Premium
join:2001-06-06
Columbia, SC
reply to ArgMeMatey
said by ArgMeMatey:

I hated the fact that when I was changing the anode rod I had to be very careful not to twist the whole setup lest it all come crashing down.

I doubt that your heater is in the middle of the basement. Why not secure it to a wall with some straps?
--
Good judgement comes with experience...Experience comes after bad judgements

Tig

join:2006-06-29
Carrying Place, ON
reply to ArgMeMatey
This is no different than setting a shower base. (check you tube) Get a bag of premix with fibre for about $6. Mix it very stiff and set it in place. Level it and trowel a bit of a finish on it.
No forms required.

mvpulsts

join:2001-11-14
Pine Lake, GA
reply to ArgMeMatey
use your cardboard idea but then cover it in duct tape


ArgMeMatey

join:2001-08-09
Milwaukee, WI
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reply to natedj
Thanks for the suggestions, all. I appreciate the discussion and I will follow up.

said by natedj:

...you're over analyzing this

" ... need to remove concrete pedestal in basement"

I completely agree that I am over-analyzing. I figure over-analyzing has a lower cost than under-analyzing, since we're not talking about burning buildings, leaking gas, basements filling with water and so on.

So future removal did cross my mind. If I pour right on the concrete floor, will it bond to the old concrete in a way that makes it useless to try to remove?
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02778712

join:2013-07-08
MA
said by ArgMeMatey:

Thanks for the suggestions, all. I appreciate the discussion and I will follow up.

said by natedj:

...you're over analyzing this

" ... need to remove concrete pedestal in basement"

I completely agree that I am over-analyzing. I figure over-analyzing has a lower cost than under-analyzing, since we're not talking about burning buildings, leaking gas, basements filling with water and so on.

So future removal did cross my mind. If I pour right on the concrete floor, will it bond to the old concrete in a way that makes it useless to try to remove?

Concrete doesn't really bond to concrete well. You need to etch it then use a bonding adhesive to make a good bond. If your goal is possibly removal later then just pour it right on top. It won't be easy to remove but it has a higher chance that way.

Why not just get a sonotube and be done with it? Sure that seems like a waste but people have already wasted more money in their time offering alternatives then the cost of a sonotube. You're going to have waste no matter how you do it.


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to ArgMeMatey
While the bond isn't going to be a structural quality, if you're unlucky you may have a very hard time removing it. But of course you can always use a plastic sheet as a liner.


cybersaga

join:2011-12-19
Welland, ON
My vote goes for the patio stone - what nunya said. He said to use grout, though I would have figured mortar. But if he did indeed mean grout, then make sure you use sanded grout, often called "floor grout (as opposed to unsanded, or "wall grout").

That'll be easier to remove if ever you need to. And it'll probably be the cheapest and fastest method involving cement.

Lay the one side of the stone on the highest part of the floor, and put grout/mortar under the low side(s) until it's level. Let it set for a day before you put the water heater back on.


02778712

join:2013-07-08
MA
reply to ArgMeMatey
Why does it have to be stone? Couldn't you just Tapcon down some PT lumber then top it with some PT plywood?


54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL
reply to ArgMeMatey
said by ArgMeMatey:

I could buy a 3 foot tall sonotube, but that seems like a waste of money.

Buy a sonotube and be done with it.

flaughs2000
Premium
join:2004-02-07
East Freedom, PA
reply to ArgMeMatey
Don't forget about the space for a drip/catch pan if required and what makes you think your heater does not have a anode rod? They can be in the form of a nipple for the hot outlet and mimic a dip tube or it can be under a knockout and insulation on top of the heater not exposed like older heaters.


ArgMeMatey

join:2001-08-09
Milwaukee, WI
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1 edit

1 recommendation

said by flaughs2000:

Don't forget about the space for a drip/catch pan ...

what makes you think your heater does not have a anode rod?

I'm not installing a pan because it's a mechanical area with a clear shot toward the floor drain. I may at some point do a condensate / backwash indirect sewer line if I ever figure out the plumbing code issues.

There is no anode rod because the tank is stainless, not glass-lined.

Now that it's Monday I can call around and see if anybody within a reasonable distance stocks a 24" sonotube. Getting anywhere besides work on a weekday is a challenge for me.

***edit*** Nine phone calls later, I did find a supplier just 20 miles from home that has an 18" linear piece of the 24" dia. for under $10! So, thanks for the encouragement.
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whizkid3
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-21
Queens, NY
kudos:9

1 recommendation

reply to ArgMeMatey
Any pad less than 4" thick is likely to easily break. If you want to adhere it to the existing slab, either use a quality adhesive or use dowels.


02778712

join:2013-07-08
MA
reply to ArgMeMatey
said by ArgMeMatey:

***edit*** Nine phone calls later, I did find a supplier just 20 miles from home that has an 18" linear piece of the 24" dia. for under $10! So, thanks for the encouragement.

Good luck on it this week-end. Take some pictures.


ArgMeMatey

join:2001-08-09
Milwaukee, WI
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said by 02778712:

Good luck on it this week-end. Take some pictures.

Thanks, will do. I ran out to pick up the tube and the guy gave it to me for nothing, so I can't complain about that.

I used a laser-level to put a line on it last night and realized I'd have been better off with a water level!

Now the other thing is, this tube is a lot thicker than the 8" tube I've used before. They recommended a circular saw, but I want to cut it at an angle. So I'm thinking, build a little jig to hold it, set the blade depth to score it deeply and finish the cut with a drywall knife.

I realize I could probably just cut it straight around the circumference, mark a level line inside the tube, and get it close enough. So I'll hem and haw about that for a while while I'm doing the sheet metal work for the vent.
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garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
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Jigsaw
I'd use one of these...