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amb

@direcway.com

[HN7000S] HughesNet refused to replace my modem, so I bought a used one.

I've been dealing with multiple Uplink, Uplink Queuing, and Web Acceleration[I] errors for the past week, resulting in extremely slow speeds. I called HughesNet and they confirmed that my modem needed to be replaced. I asked for a callback number and was given a "PIN number" and another phone number to call. I did and the guy had no idea what I was talking about and said my modem didn't need to be replaced, but would I like to upgrade to Gen4. Lol. So I went on eBay and bought a used HN7000s modem for $30.

I have no idea how to set it up. Do I have to have my current modem de-commissioned by HughesNet before they can register the used modem? Alternately, if I am able to set the used modem up correctly but discover it does not work as intended, can I switch back to my old modem or do I have to go through the de-commission/register process again? I went through some other threads and saw mentions of having to download a config file. Would I have to do that, too?

Also, do I need to be the account holder to authorize all of this?



james1979
Premium
join:2012-10-09
Quinault, WA

While we await a more informed response, I recall reading on this forum that HN had "shut down" buying modems on eBay on them registering them to replace malfunctioning modems. (They really want you on Gen4.)

I forget who supplied that information, but the source was respectable enough that I ethically disposed of my HN7000S modem rather than selling it on eBay.



grohgreg
Dunno. Ask The Chief

join:2001-07-05
Dawson Springs, KY

3 edits
reply to amb

Although unlikely, a ground wire that has broken or come loose can cause symptoms like this. If you found yourself rebooting/power cycling the modem to get performance back, you should first give your grounding wires a health & welfare check. Segments to check;
1. Loose cable connectors anywhere in the cable path. And that means both loose where the screw on to a connector AND loose on the cable itself.
2. TRIA to antenna bracket bonding wire
3. Pole or mounting arm to common ground
4. cable block to common ground
5. 3 prong plug on modem power adapter and the receptacle into which it's plugged.
You might find something that fixes the problems you're currently enduring. If not, it's good to know anyway - that your replacement modem will be going into a properly grounded system.

If it does come to replacement, don't uninstall the original modem right away. There is some info in the user interface that you'll need to use for the replacement modem. Don't worry about decommissioning the old one, you're technically just replacing a piece of hardware. »customer.kb.hughesnet.com/Docume···01_c.pdf should help you with installing the new modem. Necessary downloads (to update the modem you bought) can be obtained at »www.montanasatellite.com/#!hughe···ds/c1bcy. As James says, you may have wasted $30. But you'll never know till you try.

Too bad I didn't realize your intent sooner, I have two perfectly good HN7000S modems boxed up in the basement. I also have two complete 2 watt TRIAs, a 98cm dish, mounting hardware, and a lot of 3 GHz cable down there too.

//greg//
--
Former DirecPC/Direcway/HughesNet customer and forum participant since 2001



amb

@direcway.com

I took a look at the cables and satellite and I don't see anything that looks like it could be broken, though I can't be sure because satellite equipment/knowledge is way out of my league. I wanted them to send a tech out because we've had similar issues in the past because of the satellite, but it's been difficult to get anyone at HughesNet to agree.

The slow speeds and errors seem to get worse throughout the day, but the early morning free time seems unaffected, at least when it comes to speed. I've also noticed the Receive status flicker from normal RxCode 5 to red flag RxCode 7, plus Web Acceleration status is often degraded.

Luckily, I have a 30 day window to return the $30 modem. Greg, you actually helped me on here a few years ago and after what James said, I'd much rather acquire a modem from someone on this forum instead of an eBay one that may or may not be shut down.



grohgreg
Dunno. Ask The Chief

join:2001-07-05
Dawson Springs, KY

1 edit

Well, that Error Code would have been nice to know up front;
RXCODE 7 The receiver is locked to an unknown network.
This condition should only be seen during installation and occurs when the receiver is locked to a signal but there is no DIRECWAY Network ID on that signal. If this occurs during pointing or commissioning, the antenna has not been pointed correctly. If it occurs during normal operation, it may be due to the user changing acquisition parameters, including frequency and/or location of satellite, or the antenna becoming misaligned. The former condition can be corrected by re-commissioning the site. The latter requires an antenna repointing.


If you haven't already, you need to tell tech support about chronic RX7 faults. That should justify sending a tech out to see you. And when you run into that next brick wall with that script reading bunch, request the issue to escalated. They'll likely initially put a floor supervisor on the phone. If/when you run into the same brick wall, repeat your request that the RX7 issue get escalated.

And yes, both my HN7000S modems were removed from service with the accounts in good standing. But they still have my old SBC files loaded. If you want to use one of them, we can deal with that situation off-forum. But if you're actually successful in getting a competent repoint, your modem concern may resolve itself.

//greg//
--
Former DirecPC/Direcway/HughesNet customer and forum participant since 2001



amb

@direcway.com

Alright, I'll give HughesNet another call on Monday and see what they say. The RX7 errors aren't frequent, but they happened in a quick enough succession to have me worried. Uplink Queuing and Web Acceleration are the errors I see every day, all day long. Is there any place in the modem's IP page I could look at to see if it's more likely a satellite issue? Just to have more evidence for HN when I call.



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

Are you familiar with the push-pull test to determine if the dish is properly pointed?
--
Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool traveling in a 2004 Blue Bird M380



amb

@direcway.com

I have heard of it, but I'm not sure how to do it correctly.

Just to clarify: my signal strength is currently at 82 and dips to 65-75 at night. The RX7 errors happened twice: once while it was raining and again when I was on the phone with HN. I mentioned it to him and he said that it was my modem, not my satellite- though I don't really trust what he was saying with how hard they keep trying to push Gen4. Haven't seen an RX7 error since then, but is that something that can just go away?

And to give an example of my slow speeds problem: I tried to download a 90mb file at 10am and it would've taken 8 - 10 minutes, which is normal for me. At 2pm, I tried to download the same 90mb file and the estimated time was 1 hour.



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

Your speed fluctuation is within the normal range of experience on Hughes, which depends on transponder loading. By itself I would never take it to mean that there is a problem.

Your strength of 82 is only meaningful if it turns out that 82 is the best you can get. If you could get 90, 82 is poor.

With push-pull, you have someone watching strength as you push on one side of the dish (from behind) while pulling on the other, then the same with top and bottom. If you are properly pointed the signal will drop for each test. If it rises, you are not optimally pointed.

I do not, personally, consider pointing to be so difficult as to require a service call. It is something that at one time thousands of RVers did on their own. Not so much anymore as 4G has become ubiquitous.
--
Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool traveling in a 2004 Blue Bird M380



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5
reply to amb

Incidentally, a signal drop at night can mean (but does not necessarily mean) moisture in the feedhorn that is condensing at night.
--
Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool traveling in a 2004 Blue Bird M380



amb

@direcway.com

79 was my average signal strength. I tightened the modem's cables a couple days ago and am now getting 80 - 83 throughout the day. Just checked at 9pm and it's 79/80.

We had a condensation issue (in addition to a broken piece of equipment- can't recall what it was) a few years ago that took three techs and almost a month to fix. The internet would work at night and on overcast days, but completely stop working when it was sunny out. Is moisture in the feedhorn something I can check out or fix myself?



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

It is usually obvious. There are a number of factors that can make fixing range from easy to impossible. I wouldn't worry about it if you can't see it.
--
Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool traveling in a 2004 Blue Bird M380



grohgreg
Dunno. Ask The Chief

join:2001-07-05
Dawson Springs, KY
reply to amb

said by amb :

79 was my average signal strength.

Average is not the goal here. Precipitation not withstanding, what's desired is a RX signal level that's otherwise consistent day or night. A regularly observed rise/fall of RX signal level on a 12/24 hour basis is a strong indication of a Center Of Box issue, which is just another another symptom of a pointing error. The push/pull test is a gross indicator whether or not you need your Az/El/Pol competently optimized to remedy such pointing errors.

It's the nature of forums that anonymous posters don't always get the degree of attention and/or assistance afforded actual forum members. And it benefits all when new members flesh out their profiles. Quite often it helps us help you when we know where you live without having to play 20 questions.

//greg//
--
Former DirecPC/Direcway/HughesNet customer and forum participant since 2001

amb

join:2014-01-26
Chesapeake, VA

I live in Chesapeake, VA. This is my satellite information:

Transmit Path: Satellite
Outroute: Primary
Longitude: 113 West
Receive Frequency: 981 MHz
Receive Symbol Rate: 15 Msps
Receive Polarization: Vertical
Transmit Polarization: Horizontal
22KHz Tone: Off

I don't have access to the satellite until Tuesday. I'll have to do the push/pull test then. I also checked my signal strength at 8am and it's at 82. I'll continue to check it throughout the day.



grohgreg
Dunno. Ask The Chief

join:2001-07-05
Dawson Springs, KY

3 edits
reply to amb

Day and night. COB issues only become evident when analyzing RX levels on a 12 hour basis. Try to determine the time of day you see the signal at its highest. Once that time is established, watch daily at that time and AGAIN 12 hours later.

As HughesNet load sheds the Ku-birds, they often arbitrarily shuffle you around to different transponders on the same satellite. Alternating transponders are of opposing polarization. One of the key elements of properly aligning a dish is the POL (polarization) angle. Ideally the dish should be rotated to a position where the ACP value is equal, regardless of polarization. When rotated right or left of optimum, the system will favor one polarization over the other. When this happens, one of the things that reflects the difference is the transmit error rate.

But given your stated inexperience, that's probably above your skill level. But it's the job of an installer to optimize ALL pointing angles, including POL. Only when you have an optimized antenna and a competent grounding system can you accurately assess modem performance.

Another issue is your low look angle (Elevation). You're ~76W longitude, yet the assigned satellite is way over at 113W. As look angles decrease, noise levels increase. Noise is interference, and affects modem performance. If you can manage to get an installer there, ask for your account to be shifted to a HughesNet leased satellite that is closer to your own longitude. That will necessarily increase your El angle, and decrease noise on the link. It's a justifiable request too, as »www.montanasatellite.net/downloa···ules.pdf says you should be on G17 (91 degrees West)

//greg//
--
Former DirecPC/Direcway/HughesNet customer and forum participant since 2001