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SimplePanda

join:2003-09-22
Toronto, ON
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL

Rogers Standalone Modem Ideabox

Denizens of DSLR,

Wondering if everyone with an account on rogers.com can take the time to visit this page:
»communityforums.rogers.com/t5/id···-id/1036

And click the red "LIKE ^" button in the top right corner, and perhaps leave a comment saying you agree.

I'd love to put a lot of vocal pressure on Rogers to the fact that we'd really like a standalone modem device.

d



HiVolt
Premium
join:2000-12-28
Toronto, ON
kudos:21
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·TekSavvy Cable

No way, won't happen. They have a plan, and the plan is to sell/rent crippled all in ones.

If you want better standalone modems, go to 3rd party providers.

They haven't had a Standalone Docsis3 modem, in fact all their D3 modems have been all in ones.

I think so far the best one they offer is the Cisco DPC3825, as its easy to put it in bridge mode and it works properly that way with your own router...
--



oceros

join:2013-07-20
St Thomas, ON

With the amount of people that don't realize they are buying a modem only and flip out because they assumed it was wireless... rogers took a decent idea and ran with it.

Leaving NO standalone options is certainly annoying and silly though.


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:2

There's no point in Rogers offering standalone options. All of their gateways can act as standalone modems when placed in bridge mode. If Rogers offers standalone modems that will simply increase CPE spending, and you can sure as hell bet those costs will be passed on to the customer.



HiVolt
Premium
join:2000-12-28
Toronto, ON
kudos:21

They should at the very least approve a standalone modem that an informed customer can buy. Hell, they're already approved D3 modems for TPIA.

Just allow one of them!
--


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:2

Problem is that customers will expect Rogers to support those modems every step of the way including warranty swaps.



HiVolt
Premium
join:2000-12-28
Toronto, ON
kudos:21
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·TekSavvy Cable

said by yyzlhr:

Problem is that customers will expect Rogers to support those modems every step of the way including warranty swaps.

It's not that hard to explain to the person that he'll be responsible for replacing it if it breaks. Put it in the customer's account notes or send a confirmation form that a customer agrees to.

For 95% of the dumbshits that are Rogers customers, their gateways are fine. The other 5% would like a choice.
--


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:2

That's more trouble then it's worth. When you allow customers to bring in 3rd party modems there are going to be a lot of customers who don't truly understand what they're getting themselves into and they are simply blindsided by the potential costs savings.

I don't have personal experience with dealing directly with modem manufacturers but I would be willing to bet that they have little interest in dealing with anyone other than MSOs. Those customers will likely call to complain to Rogers asking them to intervene on their behalf and/or ask for credits because the modem manufacturer is making it difficult to obtain a warranty replacement.


vincom

join:2009-03-06
Bolton, ON
kudos:1

said by yyzlhr:

That's more trouble then it's worth. When you allow customers to bring in 3rd party modems there are going to be a lot of customers who don't truly understand what they're getting themselves into and they are simply blindsided by the potential costs savings.

I don't have personal experience with dealing directly with modem manufacturers but I would be willing to bet that they have little interest in dealing with anyone other than MSOs. Those customers will likely call to complain to Rogers asking them to intervene on their behalf and/or ask for credits because the modem manufacturer is making it difficult to obtain a warranty replacement.

Thet spend more time/money supporting the all in one modems for the not so tech savvy customers of theirs, which im guessing its close to 95% of them

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:2

Those people require support regardless. If they're not calling in about issues with their all in one, they'll call in asking how to configure their own router.



SimplePanda

join:2003-09-22
Toronto, ON
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
reply to yyzlhr

said by yyzlhr:

That's more trouble then it's worth. When you allow customers to bring in 3rd party modems there are going to be a lot of customers who don't truly understand what they're getting themselves into and they are simply blindsided by the potential costs savings.

I don't have personal experience with dealing directly with modem manufacturers but I would be willing to bet that they have little interest in dealing with anyone other than MSOs. Those customers will likely call to complain to Rogers asking them to intervene on their behalf and/or ask for credits because the modem manufacturer is making it difficult to obtain a warranty replacement.

So how did it work for the years and years that Rogers offered standalone modems only?

iamkyle

join:2011-03-22
Newmarket, ON
reply to SimplePanda

said by SimplePanda:

Denizens of DSLR,

Wondering if everyone with an account on rogers.com can take the time to visit this page:
»communityforums.rogers.com/t5/id···-id/1036

And click the red "LIKE ^" button in the top right corner, and perhaps leave a comment saying you agree.

I'd love to put a lot of vocal pressure on Rogers to the fact that we'd really like a standalone modem device.

d

Thanks for supporting my submission.

People - I understand the apathy towards Rogers. But the Ideabox will at least get the message centralized and seen by Rogers to take an active look at it.

HiVolt, oceros, yyzlhr, vincom...I hear you. I get that the general public may not be able to figure it out. But at least offer the choice! Lend us your voice and the +1's at the link above to give it some traction.

Let's see if we can get a win here.


Treegravy
Premium
join:2011-04-21
canada
reply to SimplePanda

Good luck guys. But Rogers wants to sell 200$ modem/gateways not 100$ modems. They get a better rental on the combo boxes - $7. A cold day in hell to give that up.


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:2
reply to SimplePanda

said by SimplePanda:

said by yyzlhr:

That's more trouble then it's worth. When you allow customers to bring in 3rd party modems there are going to be a lot of customers who don't truly understand what they're getting themselves into and they are simply blindsided by the potential costs savings.

I don't have personal experience with dealing directly with modem manufacturers but I would be willing to bet that they have little interest in dealing with anyone other than MSOs. Those customers will likely call to complain to Rogers asking them to intervene on their behalf and/or ask for credits because the modem manufacturer is making it difficult to obtain a warranty replacement.

So how did it work for the years and years that Rogers offered standalone modems only?

Consumer grade routers did not exist and customers hooked up a hub to their modem and paid Rogers for multiple IP addresses.


SimplePanda

join:2003-09-22
Toronto, ON
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL

said by yyzlhr:

said by SimplePanda:

said by yyzlhr:

That's more trouble then it's worth. When you allow customers to bring in 3rd party modems there are going to be a lot of customers who don't truly understand what they're getting themselves into and they are simply blindsided by the potential costs savings.

I don't have personal experience with dealing directly with modem manufacturers but I would be willing to bet that they have little interest in dealing with anyone other than MSOs. Those customers will likely call to complain to Rogers asking them to intervene on their behalf and/or ask for credits because the modem manufacturer is making it difficult to obtain a warranty replacement.

So how did it work for the years and years that Rogers offered standalone modems only?

Consumer grade routers did not exist and customers hooked up a hub to their modem and paid Rogers for multiple IP addresses.

Sure, in the LANCity and then Terayon days maybe... I remember having Linux towers strapped to those devices to serve my bedroom LAN. Very much pre-consumer router....

But from the DOCSIS 2.0 days onward routers were pretty common. I don't think my SB510x was -ever- direct connected to a PC or home-built router. I used that modem (it was actually 2 as the first one literally "popped" one day) for years before DOCSIS 3.0 came out and I moved to the D3GN.

So alas, my question was somewhat rhetorical; my point being that Rogers had long operated with consumers using their own routers and the sky didn't fall in on them.

Returning to a standalone modem offering AMONGST their gateway offerings, even with the proviso that you couldn't receive support beyond the modem (a la demarc support with Bell), would be a good move and it would hardly turn into a run on support lines.

Sure, you can bridge a gateway; but ask CGN3 owners how that's working out for them...

@iamkyle - good luck!


TypeS

join:2012-12-17
London, ON
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
reply to yyzlhr

said by yyzlhr:

That's more trouble then it's worth. When you allow customers to bring in 3rd party modems there are going to be a lot of customers who don't truly understand what they're getting themselves into and they are simply blindsided by the potential costs savings.

I don't have personal experience with dealing directly with modem manufacturers but I would be willing to bet that they have little interest in dealing with anyone other than MSOs. Those customers will likely call to complain to Rogers asking them to intervene on their behalf and/or ask for credits because the modem manufacturer is making it difficult to obtain a warranty replacement.

Standalone routers fail far, far less than the gateway models. Gateway models typically fail on a router feature such as the wireless while the RF modem portion is still fully functional.

Warranty swaps wouldn't be a problem. If customers demand swaps for issues w/o proper diagnosing, that's a thinking process created by Rogers since they like to replace modems for so many issues.


JeffBeck

@96.125.134.x
reply to SimplePanda

They do have standalone modems but they are only for business customers.

There is no rationale why they can't give them to consumers.

The modem we have installed is a DPC3010 and it can handle Docsis 3.0 8X4 connections.



sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:12
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile
·TekSavvy Cable
reply to yyzlhr

said by yyzlhr:

Consumer grade routers did not exist and customers hooked up a hub to their modem and paid Rogers for multiple IP addresses

Nonsense. Consumer grade routers were available certainly around in 2001 when I bought one and before that Windows had this neat capability called ICS (Internet Connection Sharing) ... a 2nd LAN card and you were good to go and with a hub, you could connect several computers. Wireless routers were rather more rare though.

Certainly since it became rogers.com after @home went bye bye in 2002, and LANcity and Motorola wave modems and Terayon modems were still around, you could get consumer routers. I have a bricked Netgear purchased around then.

What this really comes down to is exclusivity deals that Rogers signs with the manufacturers to get the best prices they can for the units they pick. When the exclusivity deal expires they move on to the next one.


HiVolt
Premium
join:2000-12-28
Toronto, ON
kudos:21
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·TekSavvy Cable
reply to JeffBeck

said by JeffBeck :

They do have standalone modems but they are only for business customers.

There is no rationale why they can't give them to consumers.

The modem we have installed is a DPC3010 and it can handle Docsis 3.0 8X4 connections.

How did you swing this? I am on Rogers Business 60/10 at work with a DPC3825, and while its working fine in bridge mode, i'd like a standalone modem only...
--


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:2
reply to TypeS

said by TypeS:

said by yyzlhr:

That's more trouble then it's worth. When you allow customers to bring in 3rd party modems there are going to be a lot of customers who don't truly understand what they're getting themselves into and they are simply blindsided by the potential costs savings.

I don't have personal experience with dealing directly with modem manufacturers but I would be willing to bet that they have little interest in dealing with anyone other than MSOs. Those customers will likely call to complain to Rogers asking them to intervene on their behalf and/or ask for credits because the modem manufacturer is making it difficult to obtain a warranty replacement.

Standalone routers fail far, far less than the gateway models. Gateway models typically fail on a router feature such as the wireless while the RF modem portion is still fully functional.

Warranty swaps wouldn't be a problem. If customers demand swaps for issues w/o proper diagnosing, that's a thinking process created by Rogers since they like to replace modems for so many issues.

That is very true, however all devices can fail for other reasons. The most common being that it stops powering on without explanation. Although this is rather unlikely, when you deal with millions of customer you will end up with a sizeable number of customers who will have issues with that.


SimplePanda

join:2003-09-22
Toronto, ON
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
reply to sbrook

said by sbrook:

said by yyzlhr:

Consumer grade routers did not exist and customers hooked up a hub to their modem and paid Rogers for multiple IP addresses

Nonsense. Consumer grade routers were available certainly around in 2001 when I bought one and before that Windows had this neat capability called ICS (Internet Connection Sharing) ... a 2nd LAN card and you were good to go and with a hub, you could connect several computers. Wireless routers were rather more rare though.

Certainly since it became rogers.com after @home went bye bye in 2002, and LANcity and Motorola wave modems and Terayon modems were still around, you could get consumer routers. I have a bricked Netgear purchased around then.

What this really comes down to is exclusivity deals that Rogers signs with the manufacturers to get the best prices they can for the units they pick. When the exclusivity deal expires they move on to the next one.

I'm much more inclined to believe this is the root cause. I'm just hoping that the next deal they make includes a standalone.


SimplePanda

join:2003-09-22
Toronto, ON
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
reply to JeffBeck

said by JeffBeck :

They do have standalone modems but they are only for business customers.

There is no rationale why they can't give them to consumers.

The modem we have installed is a DPC3010 and it can handle Docsis 3.0 8X4 connections.

How did you get this?

One of the offices I manage (Rogers 30/5) would -love- this.

d

cepnot4me

join:2013-10-29
Severn Bridge, ON
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
reply to SimplePanda

Everything your all saying is right. Rogers got into wireless gateways because we were consistently getting sent out and the issue was the customers router, followed by people yelling at us to fix it when we told them it was their router.
Hence no other options other than wireless.

However, rental on a non gateway is like $3/month. Versus $8/$12 for current models.
I don't like paying for features I don't use. Customers should have the choice.


cepnot4me

join:2013-10-29
Severn Bridge, ON
kudos:1
reply to JeffBeck

I was thinking of this.. buisness accounts, small office home office accounts.. you can get the SMC managed router, static IP and a very different cap and bandwidth.

Anyone ever tried to set up a home business account for the static IP?


cepnot4me

join:2013-10-29
Severn Bridge, ON
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
reply to SimplePanda

Contact The business department, or a commercial sales rep. The options are available. The docsis 2, managed router is the same as the SMC wireless G, without wireless and ports 2-4 are physically disconnected. Modem permanently bridged so to speak.


dtchmshkyan

join:2013-08-12
Ottawa, ON
reply to SimplePanda

I just spoke with a business specialist who confirmed that they used to offer Cisco DPC3010 to business customers but they don't do it anymore. The current offering is Cisco DPC3825 in bridged mode.



HiVolt
Premium
join:2000-12-28
Toronto, ON
kudos:21
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·TekSavvy Cable

said by dtchmshkyan:

I just spoke with a business specialist who confirmed that they used to offer Cisco DPC3010 to business customers but they don't do it anymore. The current offering is Cisco DPC3825 in bridged mode.

Ah, crap... Oh well...
--



JeffBeck

@96.125.134.x
reply to HiVolt

It is a business line from a reseller of Rogers. I would assume they got the modem directly from Rogers as we have a Bell line as well from the same company and we actually got one of the Fibe TV modems.



HiVolt
Premium
join:2000-12-28
Toronto, ON
kudos:21

Interesting, I wasn't aware that rogers does wholesale business accounts... What company is it?
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