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IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
Reviews:
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1 recommendation

[Landscaping] Clearing out hydrants in snow

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After the recent heavy snow and I've been doing this for years is I've been making sure the hydrants near my house get shoveled out and there is a clear path to them. The cop that lives nearby usually beats me to the punch but there is one down the street that gets neglected.

I remember back in Iowa the fire departments had the "Adopt a hydrant" initiative to get people to shovel out hydrants in winter weather.

Do you shovel out your hydrants or does the city/fire department take care of it where you live.
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hitachi369
Embrace Your Rights
Premium
join:2001-10-03
Grand Rapids, MI
kudos:4

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My city makes it the property owners responsiblity, and will fine you if you dont clear it out.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

You have to be kidding? You don't say where you are but I bet it's not Detroit.

My wife and I were wondering on that issue in the Hampton Roads cities here. They never cleared the streets so why would they hold the people responsible for not clearing the sidewalks. I would tell them to pack it.


nyrrule27

join:2007-12-06
Howell, NJ

Jack. My sister lives in Hampton too. Originally in ny and Tennessee. She has only been there for a year and a half and can't believe how people freak out and can't drive in a little snow.



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

You would not believe the hysteria. Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Chesapeake and Virginia Beach were completely shut down.
Of course Walmart in Gloucester (the only big grocery except Food Lion) was wiped out.
The tv stations went on continuous "snow" coverage. Unbelievable.

I live about 40 miles north of them on the bay it's country and the local highway dept is very close and does a wonderful job. Of course Walmart in Gloucester (the only big grocery except Food Lion) was wiped out.


Dodge
Premium
join:2002-11-27
reply to IowaCowboy

That doesn't look wide enough to help the fire department.


towerdave

join:2002-01-16
O Fallon, IL
reply to IowaCowboy

I used to get paid by the town to shovel hydrants and senior citizen's sidewalks. There was about 5 or 6 of us doing the work. Very small town. I had 3 hydrants and 3 or 4 houses to do whenever it snowed. I'd get up VERY early and run out and do it before school.

TD



brian
Premium
join:2002-05-02
Lake Forest, CA
reply to IowaCowboy

We don't get much snow where I live. But when we head up to the mountains, and there is snow on the ground, we make sure there's a clear path to the hydrant. There is about a 5 foot tall bollard near the hydrant to mark it's location. There's rarely that much snow, but the plows can do a good job burying the hydrants.
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nonymous
Premium
join:2003-09-08
Glendale, AZ
reply to Dodge

said by Dodge:

That doesn't look wide enough to help the fire department.

Here in no snow fire guys are built. My wife says so.
But yes there they now can see the hydrant and connect even trudging through snow.
I bet is mostly seeing it and not randomly digging for it. Plus yes not markers as take time.


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada

1 recommendation

reply to Dodge

said by Dodge:

That doesn't look wide enough to help the fire department.

That's more then enough room... 2' on either side is enough for us to be able to connect, although a little more makes it easier. We'd be VERY happy to have that much space at many hydrants.

Case in point, we had a house fire last night; in the country, we had to truck water in from the closest hydrant.

The hydrant was under close to 3 feet of snow - we were 5 minutes digging to get enough exposed to use. In this particular case, didn't really impact anything, as we had 5000 gallons of water in the trucks to start, but it could have... In the inital phases, a fire doubles in size every minute; so 5 minutes to dig out a hydrant can let a small fire turn into a pretty damn big one.

Around here, it's the home-owner's responsiblity to clear hydrants, although the road's staff and FD will help if a senior or disabled person call's in; or if confitions get unusually bad...


ilikeme
I live in a van down by the river.
Premium
join:2002-08-27
Sugar Land, TX
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Vonage
reply to IowaCowboy

No need to here. On the extremely rare occasions that we actually get "snow", it never gets that high. Around here, even if there is a threat of flurries schools start considering shutting down and groceries store shelves are wiped out of the necessities lol.



PoloDude
Premium,VIP
join:2006-03-29
Northport, NY
kudos:3
reply to IowaCowboy

I always do ,even though it is in front of my next door neighbor .


bkjohnson
Premium
join:2002-05-22
Birmingham, AL
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to IowaCowboy

That clearing is a good thing to do. Fire fighting in the cold is hard enough as it is. Not for clearing, but the fire chief here used to require that we keep a bucket of kindling on the apparatus in cold weather to be used for trying to thaw a hydrant, if need be.



pike
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-01
Washington, DC
kudos:3
reply to IowaCowboy

This thread is fascinating to me. I grew up and lived in the heart of the Great Lakes snow belt, Cleveland, for over 30 years and I never once observed or heard of anyone clearing snow from around a hydrant. In years past, municipalities would plant tall Day-Glo orange stakes in the ground in late fall. Presumably this was to help locate hydrants once they were buried in snow for the winter, but even that stopped long before I moved away.


telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06

1 recommendation

up here the city im in puts a stake on every fire hydrant. then after ever snow storm the city clears out the fire hydrants with a back hoe. those who like their lawns clear them our with shovels.



printscreen

join:2003-11-01
Juana Diaz, PR
Reviews:
·Choice Cable TV
·Coqui/PRTC
reply to IowaCowboy

No issues with that here.

Now seriously. I replied because I see you are in Mass and I have traveled there many times (not to Springfield though). I have noticed that fire hydrants there normally have a flag or some sort of marker that allows them to be found if covered under snow. I don't see that in the picture.

Also, maybe depends on the city but the in the one I visit often I think that people are required to clear snow around fire hydrants if they have one in front of their property.


Hellrazor
Bah Humbug

join:2002-02-02
Abyss, PA
reply to IowaCowboy

I shovel them out at work as a last step when we are done plowing. If they are really plowed in I will get the loader out and clear around them. People think its a waste of time until its their butt on fire...



mix

join:2002-03-19
Utica, MI
reply to IowaCowboy

There is a fire hydrant in my front yard. I have never cleared the snow around it in 25 years. I've never seen anyone do that around here... But I guess I live close to Detroit, whatever that means.



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada

Not looking to cause anything, but why wouldn't you clear around a hydrant in your own yard?



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1

If you're older and have physical limitations not permitting shoveling.



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada

Thats a reason I totally get... But if you're able, why wouldn't you?



PhoenixDown
FIOS is Awesome
Premium
join:2003-06-08
Fresh Meadows, NY
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

said by LazMan:

Thats a reason I totally get... But if you're able, why wouldn't you?

A few weeks ago, I woke up at 8, left for work at 9. Left work at 6:30 and made it home by 11pm. That's a big reason why I think some people don't get to shovel. I had to ask a relative for help.
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jp16

join:2010-05-04
united state
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to IowaCowboy

We will shovel hydrants ourselves but we are getting so busy we do not have time. Our water dept flags the plugs. We also have all of them in a TomTom gps as a POI. Each hydrant is on the screen which makes it easy to always find the closets one. Even under 3 feet of snow...



Rook008
Miles To Go
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join:2002-02-05
Far Rockaway, NY
Reviews:
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reply to IowaCowboy

NYC requires property owners to clear sidewalks, hydrants, and bus stops, and even provides a web site to file complaints about un-shoveled areas.

»www1.nyc.gov/nyc-resources/servi···s-report
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Corehhi

join:2002-01-28
Bluffton, SC
reply to pike

said by pike:

This thread is fascinating to me. I grew up and lived in the heart of the Great Lakes snow belt, Cleveland, for over 30 years and I never once observed or heard of anyone clearing snow from around a hydrant. In years past, municipalities would plant tall Day-Glo orange stakes in the ground in late fall. Presumably this was to help locate hydrants once they were buried in snow for the winter, but even that stopped long before I moved away.

When I lived in Buffalo, NY years ago that's what they did.

Beezel

join:2008-12-15
Las Vegas, NV

When I lived back in Charleston, WV. we didn't have to do it. The road crews came out and did it.



IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
reply to Rook008

I wish there was a requirement here to clear out bus stops, I spent a winter taking the bus when the car was out of service and you had to many bus stops were neglected. Bus drivers had to pull the bus to where it was clear.



Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
reply to IowaCowboy

Our city does not have an ordinance regarding snow removal from hydrants. But it is common sense. Most people do it. Like others said, it might seem like extra work you don't want to do, but when your house is on fire that extra few minutes delay can be critical. Around here the hydrants are typically completely buried out of sight under snow if they are not kept clear. The city does put flag markers on them.



ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA
reply to Dodge

Plenty wide.


Liberty

join:2005-06-12
Tucson, AZ
Reviews:
·Cox HSI
reply to IowaCowboy

Oh man I remember those days

It was my job as a kid to clear the drive, sidewalks and hydrant before & after school, back in Ks
Then we moved to the country, yahoo no more shoveling.

Instead, we boarded horses and now I had to haul bucket after bucket of hot water in mornings to pour in the frozen water pails in all the stalls.

Soon as I graduated from high school - gone to Arizona....don't miss a single bit of the weather back there - not one tiny bit.