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modemport

join:2013-08-26
Montreal, QC

TSI mentioned in TorrentFreak

»torrentfreak.com/canadian-movie-···-140311/



TwiztedZero
Nine Zero Burp Nine Six
Premium
join:2011-03-31
Toronto, ON
kudos:5

2 edits

The company usually asks for $10 or $20 per infringed title, and conceals these demands in DMCA notices so they can bypass the courts. Under the DMCA Internet providers are obliged to forward copyright infringement notices to their customers, so Digital Rights Corp can contact the alleged pirates without knowing who they are.

Meh - just another trollery outfit full of fail.
Internet providers will never voluntarily agree to disconnect their subscribers.

We won't let them run a pay up or disconnect scheme.


HiVolt
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Toronto, ON
kudos:21
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reply to modemport

And who would pay the ISP for finding out who the alleged infringer is based on IP?

It's already been established in the Voltage case that it costs an ISP quite a bit of money to figure out who used the IP at a given time.

Who would pay for this? The troll? I doubt it.
--



humanfilth

join:2013-02-14
cyber gutter
reply to modemport

Oh I love these extortion notices.

Send bill to ISP. ISP forwards bill to customer. Customer tears it up and ignores it.

But there will always be 'that customer' who panics and sends money to the troll, without any evidence from the troll of ownership of the product or how the infringement was noticed. Victim then becomes an easy cash cow, for future milking, since they have fully identified themselves.

There are trolls who will setup 'honey-pots' and actually allow people to freely download the product. The troll then records the IP address and sends extortion letter. Victim doesn't always question how they got caught, when the site(or occasionally a specific torrent IP) allowed them to download the product.
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hmm

@videotron.ca
reply to HiVolt

said by HiVolt:

And who would pay the ISP for finding out who the alleged infringer is based on IP?

Don't forget the translation someone would have to do. Translation services aren't cheap.

As far as I know that's around 25% for all of Canada. Quebec extortion notices would come under the charter and be required in French.

Try to picture the political flavour as soon as some english American troll company starts sending out extortion letters to Quebec's 95% french population demand 3,000$ for an english movie no one ever heard of. And their extortion website that would be setup to accept funds better be in French.

I think they are taking faster than they are thinking. Unless they specifically exclude Quebec at first till they figure what what to do.... Like what Voltage did by targeting only english Ontario and dropping Quebec IP's.

Hope TSI's bean counters have a good contract with a real expensive translation service

But in the big picture, these are all just hurdles right?


clarknova

join:2010-02-23
Grande Prairie, AB
kudos:7

said by hmm :

But in the big picture, these are all just hurdles right?

For a form letter? I think Ms Abramovitch will be able to figure it out.
--
db


hmm

@videotron.ca

said by clarknova:

For a form letter? I think Ms Abramovitch will be able to figure it out.

extortion form letters
phone personal in french
other correspondence in french
the website (they have websites set up to accept money) in french

I'm sure they can budget it. But compliance for an english only company entering with a new business model based on notice and notice doesn't come cheap. They will have added expenses that they don't have in the states.


TwiztedZero
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join:2011-03-31
Toronto, ON
kudos:5
reply to modemport

I think the Torrent Freak article came outa this: Rightscorp Retains Canadian Law Firm to Expand Services Internationally Looks it anyways judging from that press release.
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JMJimmy

join:2008-07-23
reply to modemport

Canadian ISPs should absolutely comply - after receiving $100-200 per IP for IP identification and another $50 for forwarding services. After that the customer is free tear it up.



hmm

@videotron.ca

said by JMJimmy:

Canadian ISPs should absolutely comply - after receiving $100-200 per IP for IP identification and another $50 for forwarding services. After that the customer is free tear it up.

Well, Jimmy, let's look at this new business model step-by-step just for the hell of it. It's a bit different than what happened with Voltage-TSI, The work is a bit more.

1. Bilingual notices comes in telling TSI to forward extortion letter to his customers.
2. TSI looks up IP's and forwards them. Charges $150/IP and the forward
3. The "threat of a lawsuit kicks in a 6 month retention of the notice on the IP owners file that I am aware of (another 60$ in costs due to retention and destruction in 6 months) Total so far, $210.
4. This is the end of TSI's responsibility in a notice-aad-notice regime
5. However, customers will indeed call them anyhow and ask question. Cost = X$ (as far as i know the CEO wears the privacy hat there, so it's a minimum 150/hr for his time).
6. Customer decides to pay up or toss it like toilet paper.
7. The Troll has 6 months total to bring it to court (As far as I can recall, the notice is kept for 6 months, so that means TSI has the IP and who the owner is past their standard 3 month retention time, which was costed above). Note: If TSI still have that data past 6 months, that's a liability since they retain data past the stated date. So destruction must occur at 6 months or people suffer (already costed).
8. If the troll is in the proper time frame, and calls TSI up for the name and address, TSI lets the customers know (that is more time on the phone and correspondence so an extra 60$/IP).
9. Up to the customer to quash, or wait for a court summons.

How much is the troll in for to get a name using this method?
A. ~150$ to correlate ip
B. Retention and destruction costs, ~60$/IP
C. Their Privacy officers time for a bunch of questions which can last 30-min to an hour? Let's lowball it to ~75$
D. If the troll follows through on the threat and gets a court order, another ~100$ for TSI to start contacting people that their info will be disclosed. IN Addition, the new step requires TSI to now retain the data in question for 1 year per the new ACT. So they now have a new record from the court + a new retention process per IP in addition to the one the previously had. (I just put it at 150$) because there would be a process to redo the previous 6 month process + destruction + contact for disclosure + calls again to their privacy officer.

I see this model costing more than what Voltage did. Its an added cost pre-process prior to a court order. This isn't free and is indeed more than what TSI charged Voltage.

150+60+75+150= $435 if following proper process of notice-on-notice and then court order (may be some more steps from TSI i didn't capture).

If these come in the thousands, TSI may as well hire people just for this and fix costs to pay those salaries + benefits + expenses + bonuses + the monthly lease of the office sq-feet, electricity, heating, lihting, maintenance items, overhead and ancillary items.

Or Maybe Harper will say this should be 20$? Never know!

So I see this costing double. Easy. Very easy. The example above comes to more than double. More steps involved.

JMJimmy

join:2008-07-23

It was a joke...



hmm

@videotron.ca

Damn you. But you got me thinking about the process in this type model. So it's no loss.

Rightscorp’s settlement demands are designed to circumvent controversial disclosure issues. Alleged infringers are reached via settlement notices attached to regular DMCA-style notices forwarded to them by their ISPs.

They are trying to circumvent the court process, but it doesn't circumvent the cost. And in fact if they make something of it via this route and then court, it will end up costing more than what Voltage paid per IP.

Guess your right. It is a joke

Still looking forward to what will go on with the Voltage group of people.


JMJimmy

join:2008-07-23

hehehe - I thought the ridiculousness of it and the winky smile would be enough of a giveaway cheers