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yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
reply to elwoodblues

Re: The need for wifi passwords strikes home!

said by elwoodblues:

said by yyzlhr:

said by HiVolt:

Rogers is partially to blame here IMO, if they allow the rocket hub to be unsecured, with the potential for monstrous charges if people steal someone's access, especially uninformed people like this lady.

I've never used one of these rocket hubs, but IMO they should not allow unsecured wifi on it.

Similar to a wireless router, the rocket hub comes preconfigured with a wireless password and ssid. Its up to the user to change the defaults. Its not hard for anyone to look up the default passwords for any device manufacturer.

Really, somje untech like Senior is going to know this?

No, but that's not the service provider's fault. If she doesn't understand she should ask for help. There are free and paid services that offer assistance with things like this.


elwoodblues
Elwood Blues
Premium
join:2006-08-30
Somewhere in
kudos:2
Reviews:
·VMedia
Once again you miss the point, just about everyone here is pretty technical in nature so it's easy to say that.

If I'm a non-techy senior, go to Rogers and get a Rocket Hub (or whatever it is) and plug it in at home. Now how is she supposed to know her Hub is unsecured out of the box, did the service provider tell her" Did they warn her she should secure it?

No, they wait till some outrageous amount of money is owned on her account and then say it's her fault for not securing the modem, but hey we're feeling generous, and we'll knock some 500 bucks off the tab.

This could have been an excellent training exercise for Rogers, how difficult would it be to
a) have the CSR warn the customer
b) send the customer an email telling to make sure they secure the modem
c) offer for a fee? to secure it for them (free for seniors?)

But no, this is typical of Rogers the other telco's they instead of taking a problem and turning into an opportunity, they blame the customer, hold their ground and end up getting more bad press.

How much money does rogers spend on their social marketing trolls each year? All it takes is an incident like this or some $25K cell phone data tab to completely wipe out all the work the trolls do.

This woman has the same mentality I do, if I made the mistake, I'll pay the bill (for eg I was charged with sending MMS for months), when I called to inquire they offered to credit me the money,I asked what number I sent the messages too, it ended up being my sister so I declined, the couple of bucks wasn't the point, it could has easily been a mistake on their part.

--
My Name is Wiley E Coyote, Super Genius

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
How do we know that Rogers didn't warn her? People ignore warnings all the time. Also, I wouldn't be surprised if the manual comes with a warning as well.


TOPDAWG
Premium
join:2005-04-27
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
reply to sbrook
You can blame the user some but really if fucking bell and rogers is going to put on a damn password at least pick forking WPA2 and a good password for the person. Bell seems to like picking WEP as that is what they did to my in laws and rogers give the password 12345678 to my brother in law and set the router with WPA2.

Way to half ass it guys. Bell had an ok password but used WEP rogers used wpa2 but used a shit password.

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
said by TOPDAWG:

You can blame the user some but really if fucking bell and rogers is going to put on a damn password at least pick forking WPA2 and a good password for the person. Bell seems to like picking WEP as that is what they did to my in laws and rogers give the password 12345678 to my brother in law and set the router with WPA2.

Way to half ass it guys. Bell had an ok password but used WEP rogers used wpa2 but used a shit password.

It doesn't matter how strong the default password is. If the end user doesn't change it, anyone can google the default password for any device manufacturer.


TypeS

join:2012-12-17
London, ON
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·TekSavvy Cable
reply to yyzlhr
said by yyzlhr:

How do we know that Rogers didn't warn her? People ignore warnings all the time. Also, I wouldn't be surprised if the manual comes with a warning as well.

BINGO, as I said earlier, sheeple tend to ignore even in-your-face warnings to have something the most convenient way. Its that whole instant gratification mentality has rooted itself in NA society.

said by elwoodblues:

If I'm a non-techy senior, go to Rogers and get a Rocket Hub (or whatever it is) and plug it in at home. Now how is she supposed to know her Hub is unsecured out of the box, did the service provider tell her" Did they warn her she should secure it?

Two people have already attested to the fact that Rocket Hub comes per-configured with a secured wireless network. She would have had to intentionally disable the security.


I_Got_Tazed

join:2014-03-18
Freeport, IL

1 edit
reply to sbrook
'


elwoodblues
Elwood Blues
Premium
join:2006-08-30
Somewhere in
kudos:2
Reviews:
·VMedia
reply to TypeS
said by TypeS:

Two people have already attested to the fact that Rocket Hub comes per-configured with a secured wireless network. She would have had to intentionally disable the security.

Define the word secure, my definition of secure is much different that of Rogers and/or Robellus.
--
My Name is Wiley E Coyote, Super Genius


Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
kudos:3
reply to TypeS
said by TypeS:

Two people have already attested to the fact that Rocket Hub comes per-configured with a secured wireless network. She would have had to intentionally disable the security.

If that is true, then she should be happy with the reduction to $345 and take it as a lesson learned. I have to wonder though if a Rogers person "helpfully" disabled WPA for the senior. Would a senior that didn't know about WiFi security know how to disable it? Maybe a grandkid or kid did so, in which case, still her responsibility.
--
“Any claim that the root of a problem is simple should be treated the same as a claim that the root of a problem is Bigfoot. Simplicity and Bigfoot are found in the real world with about the same frequency.” – David Wong

balur

join:2010-04-28
kudos:1
You don't work in support, do you?

People will 'forget' anything that puts them at fault if they feel they've been wronged, or if they think it will get them out of a bill.


Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
kudos:3
said by balur:

You don't work in support, do you?

No. Thank goodness.

said by balur:

People will 'forget' anything that puts them at fault if they feel they've been wronged, or if they think it will get them out of a bill.

Perhaps. These same sorts of "people" might work for Rogers support and may "forget" about having disabled her WiFi security for her, so as to avoid being themselves responsible for the bill. Who knows? This is all speculative. If I were Rogers I would probably waive the charges just to avoid the negative PR. How much did that bandwidth actually cost them? $0.12?
--
“Any claim that the root of a problem is simple should be treated the same as a claim that the root of a problem is Bigfoot. Simplicity and Bigfoot are found in the real world with about the same frequency.” – David Wong

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
reply to Ian
said by Ian:

said by TypeS:

Two people have already attested to the fact that Rocket Hub comes per-configured with a secured wireless network. She would have had to intentionally disable the security.

If that is true, then she should be happy with the reduction to $345 and take it as a lesson learned. I have to wonder though if a Rogers person "helpfully" disabled WPA for the senior. Would a senior that didn't know about WiFi security know how to disable it? Maybe a grandkid or kid did so, in which case, still her responsibility.

If the customer did not change the default wireless password they likely didn't change the admin password either. Anyone would be able to connect to the device and then login and change any of the settings including disabling the security all together.


Exxcuses

@videotron.ca
all the excuses aside, how much data would have to be used to get an approximate ~830$ bill on this Rogers pocket rocket wifi thingy?


Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
kudos:3
Rogers charges an absolutely absurd $10/GB for overages on their mobile plans, so it wouldn't take much.


tax on tax

@videotron.ca
so she says she pays about 60$ a month for service leaving 770$ in usage. There is about 100$ in tax in there (gov of Canada isn't innocent in the usage scam either). so she has roughly 65-gigs of data racked up in a month to give her that enormous bill?

So a whole 65 gigs of data.

Which coincidentally equals her monthly rent. F'n insane eh when 65-gigs of data is the cost of the average Canadian mortgage (outside of Toronto and Vancouver ).

Rogers isn't the only one laughing all the way to the bank, so is Revenue Canada + the provincial taxman as people get screwed every which way.

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
reply to Exxcuses
It would depend on the plan.