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TherapyChick

join:2003-09-19
Fayetteville, NC

Firemen collecting money

So this may come across wrong, but just wondering if typically my city taxes go towards funding the firestations? I'm asking because every year the firemen walk around the neighborhood to collect money for a "fundraiser" or whatever you call it. They say they'll take your family picture and want $50.00.

I don't need a picture from them, and don't want to give them $50.00 either. I told them no this year, and I feel like (and I'm sure I'm not), but I feel like now I'm on a "list" of oh, their house is on fire let's take our time getting there...

So what's the deal, anyone know? Or does it vary by city? I'm in an average sized city if that matters. I mean it's not like NYC, but we have around 300,000 people in the county so it's not like a small town with a single fire station and no budget.
--
Therapy Chicks


towerdave

join:2002-01-16
O Fallon, IL

2 recommendations

Generally when the firemen are out collecting money here, it's for an event or charity. And we have a volunteer fire dept, but it's funded by the city.

The VERY small town I grew up in, the fire department had a Steak Roast as a fundraiser for the department, in addition to the money that came from the town.

TD



Jackarino
YacCity
Premium
join:2006-12-28
Allendale, NJ
kudos:1
reply to TherapyChick

The firemen in both my hometown and my shore town go around collecting money every year.

I have no problem donating as they serve the town and protect us.



Tex
Premium
join:2012-10-20
kudos:2

2 edits
reply to TherapyChick

Let me first say that I respect firefighters and I am grateful for the service they perform.

The firefighters in my small Texas town are volunteers. In fact, I work with one of them. During the almost seven years we have lived in this town, we have donated money many times during fundraising events. Among the fundraising events is an annual take-out dinner that is prepared by the firefighters at the fire station. And, each year, they move their fire equipment to a few parking lots of local businesses for the community to stop by and look at the equipment, which is especially appealing to the kids. At that time, they do accept donations. I have never experienced firefighters coming to my front door soliciting donations.

Having said that, the smaller town down the highway from us also has a volunteer fire department. Every year, they switch the signal lights at the only major intersection to flashing red, which causes all traffic in all four directions to have to stop. The intersection is manned by the local police department and many of the volunteer firefighters. While traffic is stopped, the firefighters walk up and down among the stop vehicles soliciting "donations". Granted, no one is forced to donate, but I would estimate almost all who are forced to stop their vehicles give some money. Though I've never said anything and I, like almost everyone else, give money, I feel this kind of tactic should be prohibited.

OP, I highly doubt your local firefighters have put you on a "list" for not donating money.


TherapyChick

join:2003-09-19
Fayetteville, NC
reply to Jackarino

said by Jackarino:

The firemen in both my hometown and my shore town go around collecting money every year.

I have no problem donating as they serve the town and protect us.

I guess that's the thing, and kinda feel the same way about the military, yeah, they're serving the town, but so is everyone else who has a job. Yes, they are putting out fires, but it's something they chose to do probably because they enjoy it for one reason or another. I would hope my police aren't counting on going door to door collecting money to serve me. Raise the taxes or cut funding here or there if you need money to buy firetrucks or hoses or whatever you need.

I don't want to come across sounding callous, but half the reason I said no is because I don't like trying to be guilted into paying. And I do donate a good chunk of money each year to local charities, so it's not that I'm just a tightwad.
--
Therapy Chicks

PX Eliezer
Premium
join:2013-03-10
Outland
kudos:6
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reply to TherapyChick

said by TherapyChick:

So this may come across wrong, but just wondering if typically my city taxes go towards funding the firestations?

....but for that specific answer you should inquire locally in the city, town, or county where you live; there is no "typical"....

You should at least be able to find out if the local firefighters are paid or volunteers.


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to TherapyChick

It's not uncommon for the municipality to cover the costs of maintaining existing equipment; but the firefighters to do fundraising to purchase new or upgraded equipment...

We raised the money to buy our new 'Jaws of Life' hydraulic tools; among many other peices of equipment. We (the firefighters association) then donate the equipment to the township, who then covers the ongoing maintenance and operating costs...

We do BBQ's, car washes, speghetti dinners, etc... The door to door thing is a little tacky, IMO, but won't condemn... And no, it doesn't change how we respond, if you give or not.


BoulderHill1

join:2004-07-15
Montgomery, IL
Reviews:
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reply to TherapyChick

I would think that a portion of your taxes go to supporting the fire department. Of course this varies across the country as to the manner that your fire and/or police protection is paid for.

When you see the fireman out collecting donations it is not for themselves or to support the department, it is usually for some sort or cause or event or charity.

For example after 9/11 the local fire department here was out collecting for those victims. And after Katrina. Or after Boston bombing. Or after Tsunami. Or -insert catastrophe here-

In my area they do the "fill the boot" in which the fireman has his fire boot out and accepts donations placed in it. they will do the thing where they stand out in the street at a busy intersection of town and approach vehicles as they stop.

I'm not sure why the fire department takes this on. I do know that the fireman that are out "filling the boot" are not on duty. It is a voluntary act they are doing. There is no law or local ordinance that states the fire department must raise funds for other charitable causes.

I suppose it might be pressure/guilt/respect thing to coerce people to give. I mean people are more likely to give to the fireman in his fireman gear that just some regular joe standing on the corner.



Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2

said by BoulderHill1:

In my area they do the "fill the boot" in which the fireman has his fire boot out and accepts donations placed in it. they will do the thing where they stand out in the street at a busy intersection of town and approach vehicles as they stop.

I'm not sure why the fire department takes this on. I do know that the fireman that are out "filling the boot" are not on duty.

They do the "fill the boot" around here as well and I'm 99% certain that they're collecting the money on behalf of a charity. Whether they're on-duty or not, I don't care. Dayton FD employees, as I recall, work 36-hour shifts. I don't mean this negatively, but they're not necessarily "working" - they may be watching TV, shooting hoops on the net outside, etc. One station built a putting green !

Pete Post

join:2014-02-01
reply to TherapyChick

When you see Firemen out collecting donations they are NOT collecting to fund the fire-station, they are collecting for some charity like MDA Labor-day weekend.

Did you think of asking what charity they were collecting for or just assumed it was for their hookers and coke fund.


TherapyChick

join:2003-09-19
Fayetteville, NC

said by Pete Post:

When you see Firemen out collecting donations they are NOT collecting to fund the fire-station, they are collecting for some charity like MDA Labor-day weekend.

Did you think of asking what charity they were collecting for or just assumed it was for their hookers and coke fund.

They actually were collecting for the firestation.

And it's pretty ironic that you assumed that I assumed something. You're a real smart fellow.
--
Therapy Chicks


OSUGoose

join:2007-12-27
Columbus, OH
reply to Hall

I've always wondered how closely that was tracked, who's to notice if a few bills ended up in the fireman's pocket.


Oedipus

join:2005-05-09
kudos:1

said by OSUGoose:

I've always wondered how closely that was tracked, who's to notice if a few bills ended up in the fireman's pocket.

Don't have to worry about that around here; base pay is 70k+. Not bad, given that most of the time they're waxing the truck or waxing their carrots.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to TherapyChick

We have a volunteer department in my area. Most of the additional fundraising goes to purchase the turnout gear for the new volunteers (not cheap!). Taxes cover the station and equipment, and the salary of the Chief and Office Manager.

Every area and department is different...



dark_star

join:2003-11-14
Louisville
kudos:1
reply to TherapyChick

Let me start off by praising firefighters. People like me run out of burning buildings. Heroic firefighters run into burning buildings, to save life and property.

That said, same thing here in Louisville. Every year, around June, major intersections are snarled as every firefighting district competes to raise as much as possible not for themselves but for a local charity, the Crusade for Children. They (firefighters) also knock on residential doors (using firetrucks with sirens sounding as transportation), and there is a local telethon featuring local media personalities.

I used to contribute to this good cause. But getting shaken down at every major highway intersection and the traffic jams caused by said shakedown gets old after experiencing it every year for decades.

Even better, one of the local municipality's fire Chief was convicted of multiple felonies for stealing donations. He got caught and convicted of stealing 200k. But given his very fancy local house, Florida condo, seven Corvettes, and only god knows what else, that was probably the tip of the iceberg.

»www.justice.gov/usao/kyw/news/20···-01.html

In short, at intersections, I politely decline to donate. If I am home when they knock on my door, I usually smile and donate $1.



Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to Pete Post

said by Pete Post:

When you see Firemen out collecting donations they are NOT collecting to fund the fire-station, they are collecting for some charity like MDA Labor-day weekend.

That is not always the case. Especially in rural areas many times they are collecting to fund equipment purchases. Sometimes they are even raising money to fund such basic firefighting equipment as turnout gear etc. These men and women donate many hours for training and firefighting the least citizens can do is donate to help them provide the equipment they need.
--
Written using Dragon NaturallySpeaking


Voxxjin
Made of Hamburger
Premium
join:2010-01-13
Dupont, WA
Reviews:
·CenturyLink
reply to TherapyChick

I don't recall them ever coming to the door asking for money. Where I grew up in PA they would do BBQs or other foods and have big dinners. The best chicken corn soup is made by fire departments.
--
Cry "Havoc!" and let slip the dogs of war



kingdome74
Let's Go Orange
Premium
join:2002-03-27
Syracuse, NY
kudos:5
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reply to TherapyChick

The fire department I belonged to was owned by the members of the department and we contracted with the town and village for payment of services. Obviously this is very unique but not uncommon up here because our departments were incorporated back in the 1850's (our company actually founded in 1789). The village and town love it because we charge them about 60% of the neighboring companies and we raise all the funds for equipment and vehicles (a decent heavy rescue can easily top 300K) ourselves. Fortunately the community is awesome supporting our company.
--
#3 seed South. Playing Buffalo for the first two rounds. The NCAA was pretty kind to us for a change.



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to Msradell

said by Msradell:

That is not always the case. Especially in rural areas many times they are collecting to fund equipment purchases. Sometimes they are even raising money to fund such basic firefighting equipment as turnout gear etc. These men and women donate many hours for training and firefighting the least citizens can do is donate to help them provide the equipment they need.

This.

As I mentioned above - it's not at all unusual for members of a department to do fundraising to get new or upgraded equipment...

PX Eliezer
Premium
join:2013-03-10
Outland
kudos:6
Reviews:
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said by LazMan:

As I mentioned above - it's not at all unusual for members of a department to do fundraising to get new or upgraded equipment...

In many areas the fundraising also involves rescue squads and EMT services.

These services are always in need of new equipment, training to meet ever-changing state requirements, etc.

-----

I have lived much of my life in places that have volunteer fire departments and rescue squads.

I try to contribute when I can---in my current town fundraising is mostly by mail---

Sometimes people want to tell the town board to deny money to fix the fire station or buy a new truck. That's nuts. The local people should be glad that the firefighters are volunteering---the least that the citizens can do is pay for the facilities!

Paid fire departments would cost far more....

-----

I used to live near Chesapeake, Virginia, at a time when that city had combined the job of police officer and firefighter. I think they gave up that experiment.

Pete Post

join:2014-02-01
reply to TherapyChick

said by TherapyChick:

They actually were collecting for the firestation.

You never mentioned THAT fact ... Don't like it, don't give them a cent, how hard is that?