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ispalten

join:2005-04-16
Clermont, FL
kudos:1

[Internet] What is BH's DHCP server address?

I'm probably chasing a 'ghost', but my Netgear R7000's log is showing constant (varying times) DHCP events.

Also I see I have a difference in DHCP server addresses, the one the PC's and iPad's see and another the Router sees.

Now the LAN ones are clear, the IP Address of my Router which is the DHCP server. The Router however I would think would point back the BH? I do NOT recall being able to see this on other routers I've had though?

This is what the Router shows me.

============

Connection Status

IP Address 68.202.181.xxx
Subnet Mask 255.255.240.0
Default Gateway 68.202.176.1
DHCP Server 10.53.128.1
DNS Server 8.8.8.8
8.8.4.4
Lease Obtained 0 days,19 Hours,50 Minutes
Lease Expires 0 days,19 Hours,8 Minutes
==============

Lease Obtained always shows and 19 Hours and some varying minutes. The Lease Expires does count down and basically matches the 24 hour mark my computer was turned on. Clearly a router firmware bug....

Where is that DHCP server it sees? 10.53.128.1 is a LOCAL LAN IP Address, no?

Is it because I'm behind a bridged SurfBoard modem?

IPCONFIG /ALL says it is:

===========
Ethernet adapter Ethernet:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-23-AE-E6-D1-EF
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::8d47:e79b:eeb3:3726%5(Preferred)
IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.20(Preferred)
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Monday, March 24, 2014 1:26:31 PM
Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, March 25, 2014 1:26:32 PM
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 50340782
DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-13-7B-EE-74-00-23-AE-E6-D1-EF

DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled
==============

What IS the real BH DHCP Server IP Address?
--
Irv Spalten


Milkman

join:2011-03-10
Brooksville, FL
kudos:1
A quick Google search brought this up

»[CFL] Which DNS servers


SparkyinCFL
Premium
join:2008-12-21
Saint Cloud, FL
kudos:1
reply to ispalten
said by ispalten:

Where is that DHCP server it sees? 10.53.128.1 is a LOCAL LAN IP Address, no?

That's the local BHN server which assigns your router its external IP Address 68.202.181.xxx


BHNtechXpert
BHN Staff
Premium,VIP
join:2006-02-16
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:159
reply to ispalten
(grumbling on how I can remotely disable Irvs logs) - Irv...step away from the logs

ispalten

join:2005-04-16
Clermont, FL
kudos:1
said by BHNtechXpert:

(grumbling on how I can remotely disable Irvs logs) - Irv...step away from the logs

Gary, NOT from the log, shows on the Router connection status page

So are you saying my Router can see an INTERNAL BHN LAN IP Address? I have NEVER seen this though on any other router?

I can not access it?

Is this normal and other routers just don't show the true DHCP server? Like I said, I'm worried that this router has some bugs so I'm looking at everything.

Milkman, it is DHCP, not DNS.
--
Irv Spalten


BHNtechXpert
BHN Staff
Premium,VIP
join:2006-02-16
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:159
reply to ispalten
You LAN devices will see your router as the DHCP server. The modem sees our DHCP server and since the modem is bridged your router therefore sees what the modem sees. This is perfectly normal.


BHNtechXpert
BHN Staff
Premium,VIP
join:2006-02-16
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:159
reply to ispalten
Now stop looking or I'm changing your admin password


mixdup

join:2003-06-28
Birmingham, AL
reply to ispalten
10.x.x.x are "private" IPs. You're seeing an IP that is external to you but internal to Bright House. It's not reachable over the internet, but it's reachable from within BHN's network.


BHNtechXpert
BHN Staff
Premium,VIP
join:2006-02-16
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:159
reply to SparkyinCFL
said by SparkyinCFL:

said by ispalten:

Where is that DHCP server it sees? 10.53.128.1 is a LOCAL LAN IP Address, no?

That's the local BHN server which assigns your router its external IP Address 68.202.181.xxx

correct
--
~All truth goes through three phases. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as self-evident. - Arthur Schopenhauer ~


Aprel

join:2013-09-14
kudos:2
reply to ispalten
said by mixdup:

10.x.x.x are "private" IPs. You're seeing an IP that is external to you but internal to Bright House. It's not reachable over the internet, but it's reachable from within BHN's network.

Good summary. For more: »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_ne ··· _network

BHN uses the private 10.x.x.x IPs in several places. I remember on a previous DVR I managed to navigate to the diagnostics page and saw the DVR modem is also leased an IP in the 10.x.x.x range.


mixdup

join:2003-06-28
Birmingham, AL
Reviews:
·Charter
said by Aprel:

said by mixdup:

10.x.x.x are "private" IPs. You're seeing an IP that is external to you but internal to Bright House. It's not reachable over the internet, but it's reachable from within BHN's network.

Good summary. For more: »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_ne ··· _network

BHN uses the private 10.x.x.x IPs in several places. I remember on a previous DVR I managed to navigate to the diagnostics page and saw the DVR modem is also leased an IP in the 10.x.x.x range.

Just about everything on the BHN network is going to have a 10.x.x.x address. Your modem probably has one, too, that you can't see.

jwb1977

join:2013-09-07
Orlando, FL
No, there are a few things in the 172.x.x.x private range that I can see as well...

smcallah

join:2004-08-05
Home
reply to ispalten
The BH DHCP IP is the primary IP address of the CMTS's bundle you are connected to. The CMTS is just a router and is relaying DHCP requests from the 10.53.128.1 address you see to the real IP's of the DHCP servers back in BH data centers.

You never need to know the real IP, it doesn't matter. For all intents and purposes with the way DHCP works after the initial 255.255.255.255 request is sent by your router to the "LAN", 10.53.128.1 is the real IP.


sambowomble
Are you sure? If not check again
Premium
join:2009-11-23
Murfreesboro, TN
reply to ispalten
There are more addresses available in a 10. address range. Even common in large enterprises like myself. Now when IPV6 comes around? Not sure about that.


mixdup

join:2003-06-28
Birmingham, AL
Reviews:
·Charter
You'll still have "private" IPs that aren't routable for things just like this. Conservation of IPs is just one of many reasons ISPs put their management networks on inside private subnets like that. A major one being that there's no need to expose it to ever possibly being directly connected to the wider internet.


sambowomble
Are you sure? If not check again
Premium
join:2009-11-23
Murfreesboro, TN
Reviews:
·Comcast
True but even for massive companies, they still may think they are small and who knows what will happen in our lifetime. Companies may end up maxing out all of their IPs with all of these gadgets and such, network enabled toasters and refrigerators


BHNtechXpert
BHN Staff
Premium,VIP
join:2006-02-16
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:159

1 recommendation

said by sambowomble:

True but even for massive companies, they still may think they are small and who knows what will happen in our lifetime. Companies may end up maxing out all of their IPs with all of these gadgets and such, network enabled toasters and refrigerators

Not with IPv6 we won't It's coming....
--
~All truth goes through three phases. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as self-evident. - Arthur Schopenhauer ~



mixdup

join:2003-06-28
Birmingham, AL
Reviews:
·Charter

1 recommendation

reply to sambowomble
said by sambowomble:

True but even for massive companies, they still may think they are small and who knows what will happen in our lifetime. Companies may end up maxing out all of their IPs with all of these gadgets and such, network enabled toasters and refrigerators

In today's world most of those things are behind a NAT router, so they don't burn a public IP. When IPv6 finally hits critical mass it won't matter. IPv4 will still stick around for a very, very long time after we've "converted" to IPv6 but with NAT, we still won't exhaust IPv4 addresses with toasters. Besides, when I have native IPv6 at my house, I will likely still put everything behind a NAT on a private address subnet. There's no need for my refrigerator to be directly on the internet.


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

1 recommendation

reply to ispalten
said by ispalten:

Where is that DHCP server it sees? 10.53.128.1 is a LOCAL LAN IP Address, no?

Specifically, technically, it is an RFC 1918 reserved, private IP address. Per RFC 1918, it is not to be routed past the boundary of the network using it.

Since it is being used by BHN, as long as it stays within the BHN network, it is being used in compliance with RFC 1918. It is not, "unroutable", rather it is only routable within private networks.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum