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RedCaliSS
Premium
join:2004-08-21
Murrieta, CA

1 recommendation

reply to neonhomer

Re: [Tools] Getting the water out of my air lines

Having been a professional auto technician for over 25 yrs, working in many different environments, shops.. etc..etc and having my own equipment, talking with other mechanic's and auto body men... we all experience water in the air lines daily... just a fact of life... simplest thing you can do, be sure to elevate your air hose at least 7-8 ft high as soon as the hose leaves the compressor and be sure to leave it elevated for a minimum of 3-4ft hose length.. this will allow the water to stay in the tank and also run back down should it make it's way up the lines... been doing this for many years, also an auto oiler and air/water separator where you line drops back down to working height. this has worked for myself and numerous other fellow techs I've talked with, even in the most humid climates.


neonhomer
KK4BFN
Premium
join:2004-01-27
Edgewater, FL
That's something I didn't do... My air line comes out of the compressor and heads to the ground, and runs along the ground out to where I am working... Maybe I need to go up high before I go back down....

laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
reply to RedCaliSS
said by RedCaliSS:

be sure to elevate your air hose at least 7-8 ft high as soon as the hose leaves the compressor and be sure to leave it elevated for a minimum of 3-4ft hose length.. this will allow the water to stay in the tank and also run back down should it make it's way up the lines...

I'm in the market for a shop compressor and have been surfing like crazy on the subject and have never seen this tip--good one, thanks!

I was about to buy the $489 60Gal Husky at Home Depot, then this morning I see the 60Gal Craftsman Professional for the same price, and then I find that maybe I want a two-stage instead for some $800 (Harbor Freight) cuz a two-stage puts less hot air into the tank (lower temp air means less water to condense-out later AFAICT).

So I was all jacked-up to buy the HD and now I think I need to spend $300+ more... Bah!