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shdesigns
Powered By Infinite Improbabilty Drive
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join:2000-12-01
Stone Mountain, GA
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reply to laserfan

Re: [Tools] Getting the water out of my air lines

A dehumidifier typically has pressures above 200PSI (250 on hot days.) Most HVAC stuff is rated to a minimum of 400PSI.

you should be fine.

Yes, the 2" riser is common as it slows the air down and has a large surface area to cool the air.

I get very little water in my lines; mainly die to having a large compressor. I have a low outlet that catches the water. My line is about 20' long and all 1/2 copper. I get new no water in the traps on the filters.

A good water trap uses a venturi and swirling effects to cause change in pressure and temp locally to cause the vapor to condense. Those cheap filters mentioned do not have anything; just catch water already condensed.
--
Scott Henion

Embedded Systems Consultant,
SHDesigns home - DIY Welder

laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
said by shdesigns:

A dehumidifier typically has pressures above 200PSI (250 on hot days.) Most HVAC stuff is rated to a minimum of 400PSI.

you should be fine.

Thanks for that, but I've run into another problem which is that I don't know how to recover the coolant i.e. I don't want to just cut the tubes and release the refrigerant into the atmosphere.

I guess I should go to a junkyard and find an old motorcycle oil cooler or something to use instead.

No doubt I'm being anal about my new setup but I do "live in the clouds" thus have a lot of humidity to deal with...

telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
said by laserfan:

said by shdesigns:

A dehumidifier typically has pressures above 200PSI (250 on hot days.) Most HVAC stuff is rated to a minimum of 400PSI.

you should be fine.

Thanks for that, but I've run into another problem which is that I don't know how to recover the coolant i.e. I don't want to just cut the tubes and release the refrigerant into the atmosphere.

I guess I should go to a junkyard and find an old motorcycle oil cooler or something to use instead.

No doubt I'm being anal about my new setup but I do "live in the clouds" thus have a lot of humidity to deal with...

I know your pain, i dont have a garage, so the compressor lives under the stairs in the basement, during heating season the wife cranks up the humidifiers so the poor thing gets a lot of water, i blow down the tank often to keep it to a minimum.