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Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2

Identify a manufacturer home vs a standard construction home

My daughter and her husband are looking for their first home and some banks won't do mortgages on "manufactured homes" (I don't mean a glorified mobile home either). I'm not looking for a debate on the positive or negative aspects of a manufactured home vs a standard construction one either...

How can they identify (visually) is a home is this type ? If it had a basement, I suspect there would be clues, but one in particular does not.

comp
Premium
join:2001-08-16
Evans City, PA
Attic? May be able to tell if the roof trusses were brought in or built on site.... might not answer everything about the whole house but might help


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
I thought that it was not uncommon for "standard construction" homes to use pre-engineered trusses ?


pende_tim
Premium
join:2004-01-04
Andover, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Hall
If you can't tell, how will the bank know what type you are planning to finance?

This may apply to new construction?
--
The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits.

guppy_fish
Premium
join:2003-12-09
Lakeland, FL
kudos:4
reply to Hall
Look up at the property appraisers website information on the home should list the construction type?

LittleBill

join:2013-05-24
kudos:1
reply to Hall
i can tell you right now, i walked through about 50 houses when buying.

at least in PA there was no way to identify from the MLS info.

Some are very very deceiving. i am well aware of the construction of a home, and i was fooled on 2 of them. only way i even knew was talking the neighbor who watched it come in truck

comp
Premium
join:2001-08-16
Evans City, PA
reply to Hall
think it depends on the builder.. Mine was standard construction.. but they used engineered floor joists but some good old amish dudes built the roof trusses


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
reply to LittleBill
said by LittleBill:

only way i even knew was talking the neighbor who watched it come in truck

That was my brother's suggestion: Ask the neighbors !

Between many of us (my son-in-law, brother, brother-in-law, etc) yesterday, none of us are aware if this is a detail that has to be "disclosed" as part of a sale. The only way it should be is if manufactured homes are considered "lesser", i.e. something wrong.

pende_tim: Maybe that's the case and my daughter didn't know there was a distinction (or the banker didn't explain it fully).

nonymous
Premium
join:2003-09-08
Glendale, AZ
reply to LittleBill
said by LittleBill:

i can tell you right now, i walked through about 50 houses when buying.

at least in PA there was no way to identify from the MLS info.

Some are very very deceiving. i am well aware of the construction of a home, and i was fooled on 2 of them. only way i even knew was talking the neighbor who watched it come in truck

Who cares if it came in on a truck as long as it was built correctly and solid.
I have seen both manufactured that were solid and better than most tract homes and I have seen hand built on site tract homes that where horrible.
I think it should more depend on how well they are constructed and if designed to last.
I think yes the manufactured I have seen that where well built had modules or say roof trusses/ walls assembled at the warehouse/ factory then assembled on site with finishing work done on site.


rjackal
Premium
join:2002-07-09
Plymouth, MI
reply to Hall
said by Hall:

ome banks won't do mortgages on "manufactured homes"

Ask those banks for their method of proving that it is or isn't a manufactured home, or refuse to deal with those banks. Look into getting financed via a credit union, too.

Aranarth

join:2011-11-04
Stanwood, MI
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

1 recommendation

reply to Hall
My home is a Boca I.E. manufactured in four parts and then trucked to site and put in place with a crane and then winched together.

Once of the four pieces has a silver printed notice or house serial number and mdot number etc.

If you look in the closets or behind cupboard doors sometimes you can still find this notice.

Another give away is next to this same notices is a small wooden door behind which is a big bus plug to connect the back side electrical to the front.

Next some of the inside walls appear to be twice as thick as you would expect since it is 2x6 construction and the wall is almost 14" thick.

And the last big give way is in the roof you can see that the trusses are designed to fold down flat.

nonymous
Premium
join:2003-09-08
Glendale, AZ
reply to rjackal
said by rjackal:

said by Hall:

ome banks won't do mortgages on "manufactured homes"

Ask those banks for their method of proving that it is or isn't a manufactured home, or refuse to deal with those banks. Look into getting financed via a credit union, too.

I think we need a clearer definition of manufactured home. As said since I worked telco and out in new construction all the time I saw everything for many years.
Some yes you could tell manufactured aka cheap like a trailer. Cheap siding thin walls and everything done to cut costs. it really showed also.
Then saw the ones like said more modular with trusses walls etc done at a main point shipped to site and assembled on site. Even more solid than most done all on site with fewer flaws.
But yes I think if I remember the ones that where really cheap where advertised as manufactured homes. More was done at a plant and less done on site. Plus the main thing construction was done differently or maybe to a different set of codes. Maybe done to more a trailer manufactured house code than a real house code.

Maybe that is how you could tell as if they where built to a real houses code level? I mean if they where built to real housing code then how could a bank disqualify them?
The ones I did see advertised as manufactured even when selling new as we where looking for a house at the time did not appraise well. When looking to buy we where told outright manufactured and that even though really large may not appraise for a full loan and we would need to make up the difference in the down payment. We moved on in our search. Like said just because parts came in on a truck did not make other house manufactured.
So may be a different set of standards in the building code for a true manufactured cheap house.

nonymous
Premium
join:2003-09-08
Glendale, AZ
reply to Aranarth
said by Aranarth:

My home is a Boca I.E. manufactured in four parts and then trucked to site and put in place with a crane and then winched together.

Once of the four pieces has a silver printed notice or house serial number and mdot number etc.

If you look in the closets or behind cupboard doors sometimes you can still find this notice.

Another give away is next to this same notices is a small wooden door behind which is a big bus plug to connect the back side electrical to the front.

Next some of the inside walls appear to be twice as thick as you would expect since it is 2x6 construction and the wall is almost 14" thick.

And the last big give way is in the roof you can see that the trusses are designed to fold down flat.

Except for the quirks of the trusses and some thick walls your house sounds well made with 2x6 etc. So maybe it means more what code was it built to. Was it built to a real houses code or to say a trailer code.


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
said by nonymous:

was it built to. Was it built to a real houses code or to say a trailer code.

Manufactured homes are not in any way associated with trailers! In many ways they are actually built better than conventional homes because there is more control over the manufacturing process since it is done inside. You don't have to worry about the house getting wet during the building process and warping or delaminating materials. The same people do the same work on each one of the homes so they get really good at it. And the manufacturers always have engineers on the manufacturing floor verifying quality in compliance with the specifications. It's becoming a more common especially considering it reduces the cost of manufacturing to a reasonable level.

This no reason in any reputable bank not to finance a manufactured home!
--
Written using Dragon NaturallySpeaking


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
reply to nonymous
said by nonymous:

I think we need a clearer definition of manufactured home.

Yes, and it was partly my "old" definition of the term(s). First off, to me, a trailer is a "mobile home". That is not what we're speaking about at all. So, I won't mention it again....

Now, it seemed to me that in the past, the term "manufactured home" was more commonly used than today, where they seem to be leaning towards calling them "modular homes". They are in fact the same - they are pre-built in a factory and moved the site in multiple pieces and located permanently on a foundation (slab, crawlspace, basement).

In closing, my daughter just texted me that she checked with the bank again and to put it simply, if it's on a permanent foundation, they'll finance it. If it's on wheels, they won't.


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
said by Hall:

In closing, my daughter just texted me that she checked with the bank again and to put it simply, if it's on a permanent foundation, they'll finance it. If it's on wheels, they won't.

That makes a lot more sense. Mobile homes are just a money pit that are constantly depreciating. Manufactured homes as well as conventional homes appreciate over time, a significant difference.
--
Written using Dragon NaturallySpeaking


hortnut
Huh?

join:2005-09-25
PNW
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to Hall
Sometimes one can tell by how it is titled. In 1992 I put a new Manufactured Home on my acreage in Oregon. I chose a high end manufacturer and had it built to my specs. 2x6 outer walls, 2x4 inner walls, extra insulation, extra wiring for future needs like a heat pump, upgraded carpet, upgraded cabinets, regular sheet rock and other amenities. Title was with the DMV and the taxes I paid were a drop in a bucket compared to stick built homes based on a square foot basis and actually decreased year to year for the structure. The land valuation was different.

The State changed that in 2005 by transferring that function to the Building Codes Division (BCD). But on those forms I spot checked, there still is a need for a Serial Number and they are still called a Manufactured Structure. Looking on Oregon's site, it appears one can search a property to determine if it falls in the Manufactured Home slot.

Though in 1992 still had to go through the County for Building Permits, COO, and such.

Since I was "non-conforming", I had to find special financing for those in Agriculture. Non-Conforming arose from 2 things - Acreage and a Manufactured Home. I no longer own he home.

nonymous
Premium
join:2003-09-08
Glendale, AZ
reply to Msradell
said by Msradell:

said by nonymous:

was it built to. Was it built to a real houses code or to say a trailer code.

Manufactured homes are not in any way associated with trailers! In many ways they are actually built better than conventional homes because there is more control over the manufacturing process since it is done inside. You don't have to worry about the house getting wet during the building process and warping or delaminating materials. The same people do the same work on each one of the homes so they get really good at it. And the manufacturers always have engineers on the manufacturing floor verifying quality in compliance with the specifications. It's becoming a more common especially considering it reduces the cost of manufacturing to a reasonable level.

This no reason in any reputable bank not to finance a manufactured home!

Like said I have seen manufactured way better than normal tract homes. I have also seen some not on wheels on a real foundation that where built more like a cheap trailer. Very large but appraisers knew there was something wrong with them and they appraised way less than other brand new homes.
So maybe in some locations there may be two separate building codes.
I did not say every manufactured is bad or every site built home is good. But maybe in some localities there are allowed differences that make banks and appraisers take a second look at some manufactured homes (on foundations no wheels ever).

guppy_fish
Premium
join:2003-12-09
Lakeland, FL
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to Hall
Manufactured is the "new" mobile home ( since 1976 )

Modular is built is sections and put together on site which is equal to or better than site built

The difference is Modular is its a one time deal, once put together they can never be moved, where manufactured can be moved. Modular is put onto a permanent foundation, Manufactured is not.

The easiest was to tell is the foundation, there are steel frames which never get removed on manufactured, modular there is none.

Few banks finance manufactured as there are not permanent and can be moved, its a specialize industry, more like car loans that handle manufactured. A check with the tax collector will also show if its manufactured as they get taxed differently.

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1

2 recommendations

This.

Manufactured homes are trailers with a politically correct name.

Modular homes are true houses, And actually are many times better than stick built because they have to survive being trucked and craned.

Also they are built inside a controlled environment, This means the work never stops for rain. And that parts that are interior never risk getting rained on during construction.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports

Aranarth

join:2011-11-04
Stanwood, MI
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to nonymous
said by nonymous:

Except for the quirks of the trusses and some thick walls your house sounds well made with 2x6 etc. So maybe it means more what code was it built to. Was it built to a real houses code or to say a trailer code.

No idea. It is a very well built home and we got it for a good price. The house was a "lot model" and was actually 2 years old when it was put on the basement foundation. (we still got the one year manufacturers warranty)


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
reply to guppy_fish
said by guppy_fish:

The easiest was to tell is the foundation, there are steel frames which never get removed on manufactured, modular there is none.

I know what a trailer or mobile home is. There was NEVER any question about that - they aren't look at anything of this sort.

My topic should have been "Identify a modular home vs a standard construction home".

There seems to be companies who still call "modular" homes "manufactured" homes...


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to Hall
What about "panelized construction...?

»www.nahb.org/generic.aspx?generi ··· D=168984

guppy_fish
Premium
join:2003-12-09
Lakeland, FL
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to Hall
said by Hall:

There seems to be companies who still call "modular" homes "manufactured" homes...

Really? I doubt that as there completely different things. What manufactures would do that as you point out, manufactured can't get conventional financing.

Now listing or selling real estate sales might, but not the manufacture of the home in question.

said by Hall:

My daughter and her husband are looking for their first home and some banks won't do mortgages on "manufactured homes" (I don't mean a glorified mobile home either). I'm not looking for a debate on the positive or negative aspects of a manufactured home vs a standard construction one either...

And we and answered the question, if your family is looking at manufactured, its not modular. Look at the foundation and tax rolls if there is ever a doubt. Manufactured IS glorified mobile home, just the name changed in 1976 thanks to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, there is no grey area here.


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4

1 edit
reply to Hall
There is a lot of confusion from people not informed on the subject. There are generally three types of standard homes. Site built, modular, and manufactured.

We all know what a site built (stick built) home is. Built from scratch on the owner's property.

Modular is essentially the same thing, except built in modules in a factory, then assembled on the owner's property. They must meet all local codes where they will be put together and lived in. They are generally at least as good quality as site built. And they generally will be financed the same as stick built. They are nearly indistinguishable from site built homes to the untrained eye. You get a deed like a site built house.

Manufactured homes (A.K.A. mobile home, trailer) only need to meet HUD code, are generally smaller and built using less quality. You can find them as singles, "double wides" and even "triple wides". In most states you do not get a deed for this type of home. You instead get a title, like you would a car or trailer.

For those interested, here's what InterNACHI has to say. »www.nachi.org/modular-manufactur ··· omes.htm

dbamber

join:2003-02-07
Bandon, OR
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
·CenturyLink
reply to Hall
I helped my sister "complete" a modular home in 2001. I was told that a label provided indicating that it was a manufactured offsite listing the manufacturer, date of manufacture, building code to which it was built to comply, etc. The label was shipped to the sellers sales rep. and the label was to be be affixed in the left door of the kitchen sink base. A friend of ours out here in Arizona recently retired as a bank manager, and she had stated that a mobile,or manufactured home would not qualify for a mortgage with the bank she worked for. I have replaced cabinets in a few manufactured homes out here, and there is a world of difference between a modular vs manufactured home. And, yes I did see manufacturers labels attached to the sink base door of some of the units I worked on.


howwide

@comcast.net
reply to Hall
only partially mentioned so far, another way to tell if the home was made to be transported on the road is if its parts are built to be just wide enough to be trailed on the roads. typically 12'. can be narrower or wider. but for e.g. a doublewide triplewide mobile or modular or manufactured, if the roof trusses are built in halves or thirds and fastened together, that's one sign the sections were built elsewhere. though, as mentioned, some are built elsewhere without trusses, with the trusses and roof added onsite.


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
reply to Lurch77
said by Lurch77:

For those interested, here's what InterNACHI has to say. »www.nachi.org/modular-manufactur ··· omes.htm

From that link, they say

While the terms "modular home" and "manufactured home" refer to two very different things, they are sometimes used interchangeably. Perhaps some of this confusion stems from the fact that modular homes are, in fact, manufactured ("manufactured" might be an unfortunate label.)

and that was my thinking as well. To me, and I've said this more than once, I know perfectly well what a "mobile home" is. I never considered them "manufactured homes". I guess it's partly because I equate "home" with "house" and while I know they are "home" to some people, they are "trailers" to me (no disrepect meant, either).


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

1 edit

2 recommendations

There are millions of people in this country that a "mobile" home or "Trailer" as some of you are pointing out is their only hope of a home. Everyone is not the privileged few that apparently most of us are. Many years ago however I lived in a trailer and was a happy camper. As the number of people increases without the good jobs we had, a trailer may be the only option for them.


Steve
I know your IP address
Consultant
join:2001-03-10
Foothill Ranch, CA
kudos:5

2 recommendations

said by Jack_in_VA:

Many years ago however I lived in a trailer and was a happy camper.

So which one was it: you lived in a trailer, or you lived in a camper?

*snicker*
--
Stephen J. Friedl | Unix Wizard | Security Consultant | KA8CMY | Southern California USA | my web site