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fluffybunny

@cipherkey.net
reply to Msradell

Re: Digging up path for driveway.

how far apart should the stakes be for 1 inch thick ?


hortnut
Huh?

join:2005-09-25
PNW
kudos:1
Reviews:
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Here is a pretty good vid on doing a driveway, looks to be about your size. Shows number of people needed, tools, expansion joints, concrete sealing after floated, edged, etc., reinforcement, and more.

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dh8OMMTW-eo


Another one, that is very thorough:

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUgiHghs8vs


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to fluffybunny
said by fluffybunny :

how far apart should the stakes be for 1 inch thick ?

It depends on how thick you are pouring the concrete because the more concrete you have will increase the pressure against the forms. For 1" form boards I would say your stakes need to be about 18" apart for concrete that is 4-5" thick.

By the way, the video above shows how useless wire mesh is. You can plainly see that even after they pull it up it just goes back down to the bottom as they keep walking on it!
--
Written using Dragon NaturallySpeaking


hortnut
Huh?

join:2005-09-25
PNW
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said by Msradell:

By the way, the video above shows how useless wire mesh is. You can plainly see that even after they pull it up it just goes back down to the bottom as they keep walking on it!

One way I got around that problem was when I poured slabs at my Nursery years ago, I used concrete wire mesh, but raised it by using wire ties and 2" or thicker squares I had cut up from closed foam insulation or whatever. I used a bunch and after walking on it, tested where the mesh was resting during the pour. Seemed to work ok, as I had semis loaded with bark, plants and other driving over them. I used 2x6's for the edging, so my pours were 6 inches or more in depth. They were not fancy finished slabs, though I leveled and put a slope on the slab using a transit. Had the major tools for floating and such.

Tig

join:2006-06-29
Carrying Place, ON
For minimal extra expense you can have glass fibers mixed in the concrete when delivered. Steel mesh would not be required.


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to hortnut
said by hortnut:

I used concrete wire mesh, but raised it by using wire ties and 2" or thicker squares I had cut up from closed foam insulation or whatever. I used a bunch and after walking on it, tested where the mesh was resting during the pour

I'm sure that worked to keep the mesh in place but have insulation in that area treated a weak spot in the concrete. An alternative is to use pieces of concrete cement bricks or pavers of the appropriate thickness, that way you do not weaken that area in the concrete. The unfortunate fact is that most people who to concrete work don't take the time and effort to ensure that the mesh is in the correct location to actually do something.
--
Written using Dragon NaturallySpeaking


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
It's pretty common practice to just pull the mesh up to the middle of the pour depth as you go...


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
said by LazMan:

It's pretty common practice to just pull the mesh up to the middle of the pour depth as you go...

That's where you put it but that's not where it stays. Unless you put something under it to hold it in place is going to end up on or near the bottom of the concrete.
--
Written using Dragon NaturallySpeaking


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
Depends how thick your mix is... I've never had a problem; but I freely admit I don't do a ton of concrete...


hortnut
Huh?

join:2005-09-25
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reply to Tig
said by Tig:

For minimal extra expense you can have glass fibers mixed in the concrete when delivered. Steel mesh would not be required.

.
Interesting, would have been a lot easier. Wonder if it would be strong enough to withstand these loads, as my slabs would experience the limits, when bark and mulch came in for my potting media:
My State's limits: the maximum legal gross weight limit is 80,000 pounds. The gross weight of a single axle cannot exceed 600 pounds per inch of total tire width on the axle (limited also by manufacturer's sidewall tire rating), or 20,000 pounds, whichever is less. The gross weight of a tandem axle cannot exceed 600 pounds per inch of total tire width of the wheels on tandem axle, or 34,000 pounds, whichever is less.


hortnut
Huh?

join:2005-09-25
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Reviews:
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reply to Msradell
said by Msradell:

I'm sure that worked to keep the mesh in place but have insulation in that area treated a weak spot in the concrete

It has been a while and I have since sold the place. Did visit it a few years back and no cracks yet. I know I used something appropriate [did not have internet then to research, just books and asking the guys at the local watering hole]. And I did have a bunch of cement bricks I threw under sections. When one has acreage, one takes in a lot of friend's left over materials from their projects, never knowing what it can be used for. And if it is wood, once or twice a year have a big bonfire.