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nevyoung

@vodacom.co.za

Yes I do hate Microsoft

Why - because they treat me like a dummy. MS tells me what I - yes me - want. They go ahead and make changes without any respect for those who have been using the product for years - forced to by the corporate world. Finally upgraded to Win8.1 and office 2010 and so little of what came naturally previously, what my fingers typed without thinking is of any use. Is this really the same company which made the previous versions? Unbelievable. Access to directories is so restricted that I cannot take ownership of them. Because I cannot move some of my apps into a directory in the PATH, I try to change the PATH, but no. Gotta find a way to get the rights to do so. This is MY computer damnit!! Yes I hate Microsoft. I refuse to be their dummy. Help!


dbmaven
There's no shortage
Premium,Mod
join:1999-10-26
Sty in Sky
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You'll need to provide a bit more detail if you're really looking for help.
--
Ad astra per alas porci!!


Wily_One
Premium
join:2002-11-24
San Jose, CA

1 recommendation

reply to nevyoung
If you want complete control over your system, try out Linux. Ubuntu and Mint are pretty friendly to start with.


nwrickert
sand groper
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join:2004-09-04
Geneva, IL
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Reviews:
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reply to nevyoung
said by nevyoung :

Access to directories is so restricted that I cannot take ownership of them. Because I cannot move some of my apps into a directory in the PATH, I try to change the PATH, but no. Gotta find a way to get the rights to do so. This is MY computer damnit!! Yes I hate Microsoft.

Move the mouse to the bottom right. Click "Settings", then click "Power", then click "restart". During the reboot, select whichever linux version you have from the boot menu.

Problem solved.
--
AT&T Uverse; Buffalo WHR-300HP router (behind the 2wire gateway); openSuSE 13.1; KDE 4.11.5; firefox 28.0


kvn864

join:2001-12-18
Sun City, AZ
kudos:1
reply to nevyoung
Is this on the domain? Is this a standard user account?


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA

2 recommendations

reply to nevyoung
Things change. Shocking, I know.

If I was going to attempt to tease out a question from that rant, it would be...

"Access to directories is so restricted that I cannot take ownership of them. Because I cannot move some of my apps into a directory in the PATH, I try to change the PATH, but no. Gotta find a way to get the rights to do so."

Let's tackle the second part first. You want to change the default PATH...

Open the Control Panel (you can find it using Search on the Charms Bar).
In the Control Panel, search for and open System.
In the dialog box, select Advanced System Settings.
In the next dialog, select Environment Variables.
In the User Variables section, edit the PATH statement

Yay. Just like in Windows 7. Were you using XP before? Or W95?

As to the first part, where you want to "take ownership" of a directory:

»tipsandtricksforum.com/thread-223.html

Again, this hasn't changed in any significant way since Windows 7.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


trparky
Apple... YUM
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:2
Or... add this. Right-click on any file or directory and you have a "Take Ownership" option.

»www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-···n-vista/
--
Tom
Tom's Tech Blog

Frodo

join:2006-05-05
kudos:1
reply to nevyoung
said by nevyoung :

MS tells me what I - yes me - want.

That's because MS *know* what you want. And that is mobile and cloud.
From a story covering 1st quarters earnings.
quote:
According to Nadella, “we are well on our way” to achieving his vision of going boldly into a “mobile-first, cloud-first world.”

“With every device launch, with every service launch we keep coming back and reinforcing that vision, because at the end of the day, it’s the purpose with which we approached the vision and the execution behind it which is what counts,” Nadella said during results call.
According to a leaker, Microsoft may release a free OS that is mostly dependent on the cloud.

As far as I can tell, at MS, the new boss is the same as the old boss.


trparky
Apple... YUM
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:2
Well, for the most part Nadella is right, we are quickly moving to "mobile-first, cloud-first world". People are increasingly wanting tablets and smart phones, you can see that in how sales of smart phones and tablets keep increasing quarter after quarter.

You say...
said by Frodo:
the new boss is the same as the old boss.
I say no, I see that there is one key difference between Nadella and Steve Ballmer.

In Steve Ballmer's world, he was right and everyone else was wrong even if concrete evidence proved that he was wrong. He didn't care, he didn't give a damn what other people thought about what he was doing. It was his way or the highway, much like what Steve Jobs thought.

You can see this kind of thinking with the original Windows 8. I can see it happening like this.

Steve: "I want this touchscreen interface front and center."
Others: "But Steve, what about the desktop with a keyboard and mouse? Touchscreens only work with tablets and smart phones."
Steve: "Did you hear me stutter? I said I want the touchscreen interface front and center! Now!" *picks up chair*
Others: *shakes* "Yes sir, we'll do what you ask."
Steve: "Good, now let me fume in peace. I need to think of new and better ways to kill Google."

Fast forward to today and we hear things from Joe Belfiore stating that as far as the desktop is concerned, they are all in. This is, as far as I'm concerned, a drastic difference from the mentality that Microsoft had under Steve Ballmer. Nadella seems to realize that if you piss off the desktop users they are certainly not going to buy your smart phone and tablet devices.
--
Tom
Tom's Tech Blog

Frodo

join:2006-05-05
kudos:1

1 edit
said by trparky:

I say no, I see that there is one key difference between Nadella and Steve Ballmer.

I'll become a believer when I can go into my Office 2013 and select the brown background I use on Office 2010 at work. As far as the desktop is concerned, they had to do something to generate more PC sales and OS sales, so I don't read a whole lot into Win 8 updates insofar as meaning there is a new mentality at MS.


nevyoung

@196.2.126.x
reply to trparky
Thanks for all the responses. The walls around me did not hear the cursing. My Linux buddies would only shrug their shoulders and say what do you expect. My less computer literate friends simply accept that this is how things go with computing and adjust easily because their level of computer use is basic.

And no - I was not asking any specific questions in my post - I was only ranting. But your attempts to help are appreciated.

I started off with DOS, then Win95, 98, XP and now 8.1. However I have had plenty to do with Vista and Win7 helping friends. I have experimented with many Linux distros but never been able to migrate to them due to incompatibility issues when dealing with the corporate world to which I contract. I am astounded how much Windows OS'es change each time and so much of the time without much benefit to me. I dreaded the move away from XP to Win8 because of the garish, glossy, glitzy appearance which favoured cosmetics above efficiency. Win8.1 arrived. I was told it was much better than 8.1 and I tried it on an old 1Gig RAM laptop where it actually worked without being slow! Perhaps MS had rewritten their bloatware from the bottom up to work on the hardware limitations on tablets. I now use an i5 4G laptop.

I would say that I am a well above average computer user, knowing some C programming, writing batch files, using many many apps. I configure the OS to work in the most productive and efficient way for my purposes. I am comfortable using regedit in the registry and have not screwed it up once. My training is electronics making me comfortable with electronic and computer equipment.

I have been migrating to 8.1 for the past 3 exasperating weeks. The beast is slowly being tamed. My question is - I have not found a single bit of functionality that improves over what I had before. What have I gained? In many ways I have had to downgrade. The keystrokes I used to access menu items with have mostly changed. One instance - adding a signature to an email was Alt-I-S. Now it is Alt-NAS - one more keystroke.

I generated relatively serious spreadsheets in terms of functionality and data volume for a company I contract to. I was astonished to find that they no longer work in Office 2010 when saved as xlsx files. I had to batch replace the destination file name form xls to xlsx in every one of hundreds of links. Initially, all hyperlink functionality was greyed out. Eventually - perhaps after saving and reopening the several files - I was able batch replace all of them. That was one frustrating wasted hour later. And this is the same company which wrote previous versions of Excel??!! What happened to the notion of backwards compatibility?

Googling for help with 8.1 has been disappointing and I attribute this to not many using it yet and finding solutions to the problems the new OS raises. Most search hits are guys who love Win8 and don't see the problems I see. A typical response to my Excel hyperlink problem was simply to edit the hyperlink, ignoring the fact that there are hundreds of them to be edited and in other cases I read about, thousands of them. And this answer was from an MVP! Their responses are so often trivial, not having read or understood the question, probably never having worked with a large spreadsheet.

The trend towards pretty pictures in for instance the ribbon makes for slowing me down. I have to take my hands away from the keyboard, grab the mouse, look for the relevant icon, aim, click and get back to the keyboard. So slow. I learned to read when I was young, so can read a menu at a glance. Words are far more specific than an interpretable icon is. The ribbon text is now scattered higgedy-piggedly amongst the silly icons.

I acknowledge that I need to put more effort into understanding sharing, security, etc but why should I have to? I was working efficiently in the previous OS/app. I understand that new features will be developed over time and that actions need to be taken to adapt the app/OS to threats, but why change the interface or - if it is necessary to provide an interface to others who are happier with a mouse - why take away the previous interface? Both interfaces should be able to co-exist. I believe that the changes are commercially motivated, at the expense of computing excellence.

I get this feeling in the Microsoft environment that MS considers that they are the computer experts and that us users of their sw need to be told how to do things and what to do. A response I have had from MS is "Why would you want to do that?" "Because it works for me" is my answer and there is no reason why it can't be done/allowed.

By the way, re my specific problems in the original post - I took ownership of the Windows directory as a superuser, put my trusty, efficient fast app there so that it was in the path, logged out as superuser and reverted to my personal account where although still having administrator privileges, the Windows and other directories were restricted. My app worked!
Re the PATH variable - I can edit it and even though it is still there when check it or try to edit it again, it does not take effect. Type PATH at a command prompt and the folder I added is not there.

Hope this post gives you a better background to where I am coming from and an understanding of my much needed rant. Any constructive help or suggestions are welcomed.



plencnerb
Premium
join:2000-09-25
Carpentersville, IL
kudos:3
I do have a question after reading everything you have to say. Some (not all) of the issues that you point out seem to me to be non Windows 8.1 related. As an example, you mention the issues and pain that you went through to modify your scripts due to the change in the default file name (from xls to xlsx). Another example which could be office related (if you are using Outlook) is the change in the number of keystrokes needed to add a signature to an e-mail.

As far as I know, no one said you had to upgrade office versions when you moved to Windows 8.1. If you were running an older version of office, why not just install that on Windows 8.1? It should work just like it did before. Unless you were running Office 2000 or maybe Office 98, I don't see why Office 2003 or Office 2007 would not install on Windows 8.1.

--Brian
--
============================
--Brian Plencner

E-Mail: CoasterBrian72Cancer@gmail.com
Note: Kill Cancer to Reply via e-mail

dave
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not in ohio
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Reviews:
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reply to nevyoung
said by nevyoung :

Type PATH at a command prompt and the folder I added is not there.

You know that a command prompt gets given its PATH at process startup, right? So if you change PATH, existing cmd processes won't see the change; only new processes do.


nwrickert
sand groper
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join:2004-09-04
Geneva, IL
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Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
reply to nevyoung
said by nevyoung :

Re the PATH variable - I can edit it and even though it is still there when check it or try to edit it again, it does not take effect. Type PATH at a command prompt and the folder I added is not there.

You might have to reboot before it takes effect.
--
AT&T Uverse; Buffalo WHR-300HP router (behind the 2wire gateway); openSuSE 13.1; KDE 4.11.5; firefox 28.0

dave
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
Unlikely, unless Win8 process creation differs in this regard from all prior versions of NT. I just tried the experiment on Win7: no reboot.


nevyoung

@196.2.126.x
reply to plencnerb
Brian - thanks for the response. Upgrading in the MS environment generally is the pain. That includes Office. I might well go back to 2003, but the upgrade was again to comply with compatibility issues.

Another reason to hate MS and their prescriptive attitude is the colour schemes. I have fiddled around a lot with the schemes and end up with a mess. I try to save over a previous scheme and I end up with 2 schemes with the same name!!! There is no distinction between the white background in a window and the inactive title bar. It appears that there is no way to change that inactive title bar except by using high contrast, but that scheme renders many windows unreadable. I changed the colour in the registry but that change is ignored.

Yes - I do have reason to hate Microsoft.


nevyoung

@196.2.126.x
Ok - trying to differentiate between light-coloured titlebars and window backgrounds:

went back to High Contrast scheme where I have some more control over the various colours. BUT - a big BUT - Excel no longer shows up any colours. Googled but no answers - that is just how it is. That is how MS decided it should be! The same company writing the OS and the Office app and they overlook this?!!

Surely all these issues I raise deserve a rant. The jury was still out, but I am getting very little feedback to disprove the issues or to solve them.

YES - I have no reason yet to stop hating Microsoft.


plencnerb
Premium
join:2000-09-25
Carpentersville, IL
kudos:3
Color and font options inside of Windows 8.x are very limited, if you are someone who does a lot of customizations to those areas of your system. If you do a search on these forums for Mele20 See Profile and changing colors and fonts in Windows 8.0, you will see that she has the same issues. She had XP before going to Windows 8, and did a lot of color / font customizations.

To solve that problem, I am going to recommend the program that she uses, which is Windows Blinds. I've never used it, but from what she has said, it almost gives her the color / font change options that were present in Windows XP.

My opinion on why Microsoft took away most of these options comes from (in their mind) the "default" hardware that Windows 8 was built for, which is a tablet or smartphone. On those devices, you are limited on color options, fonts, and sizes due to limited screen size and hardware. So, why give users the choice if its going to mess up or not look good on those devices? Well, the simple answer of course is that there are LOTS of people who would be running Windows 8.x on what I consider normal hardware (Desktops and Laptops) with large screens, tons of memory, and high-end video cards. Yet somehow, in Microsoft's infinite wisdom, they failed to see that, and that's why we are where we are now.

Yes, Microsoft is working on fixing some of these issues with Windows 8.0, which is why they released 8.1, and the latest update that came out a few weeks back (8.1 Update 1). But, the ability to change specific fonts, colors, and so on that one could do in XP (and I believe Vista and 7) is still absent from Windows 8.1 Update 1.

--Brian
--
============================
--Brian Plencner

E-Mail: CoasterBrian72Cancer@gmail.com
Note: Kill Cancer to Reply via e-mail


nevyoung

@196.2.126.x
Thanks for that advice Brian.

I cannot decide if you are defending MS or also annoyed and exasperated by it. ??

This ISP forum is not entirely the forum that I was looking for, but I needed reaction to my rant from any hit relating to my 'I hate Microsoft' theme. I would like to find a forum of reasonably power users who all come up against Win8.1 issues and collectively come up with real solutions, not trivial MVP responses.

If I had the time to search I might find such a forum, but this Win8.1 and Office 2010 'upgrade' has wasted so very much working time that I need to get my head down, my mind right and focus on what I still can do in this new new working environment.

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5
reply to nevyoung
The only way to get what you want font wise and color wise on Windows 8 Pro is to buy WindowBlinds. You cannot even change the Windows 8 default font except via WindowBlinds! With WindowBlinds you can either use a premade skin or build your own. You can also get Aero back if you enjoyed that on Windows 7 (or I had it on XP Pro via nView nVidia program).

I used to have programs like Word, Office, etc. but I now use Open Office so I don't know if WindowBlinds will fix Excel but it should.

I also highly recommend Start8 to go with WindowBlinds. Do a trial of both of them.

»www.stardock.com/products/skinning/
»www.stardock.com/products/start8/

I also found the contrast for any font on Windows 8 on a very nice new Dell Ultrasharp 24" widescreen monitor was poor. Black simply wasn't really black and I found several very long threads in Microsoft's Answer forum and Technet forum about this problem. Microsoft abandoned Cleartype in Windows 8 (although they did so in a very deceptive manner as the cleartype tool is still there and appears to work but doesn't actually). After I used WindowBlinds to change the Windows default font to Verdana I then had to made Verdana Bold the default. My eyes are fine. The problem with a washed out font was Microsoft killing Cleartype in Windows 8 because it doesn't work on tablets and not caring one whit how that decision might affect Desktop users.

I would have downgraded to Windows 7 Pro with the USB key Dell sent me with this Windows 8 computer if I had not gotten Start 8, WindowBlinds and set Verdana Bold as the Windows font.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


nevyoung

@196.2.126.x
Thanks Mele20. Am downloading WindowBlinds and will try it out. I do already have an app to customise my taskbar and start menu.

All of a sudden I have bright orange active tabs - no idea where they came from!!! Lets hope WB fixes that.

I have been trying to use OO for the past 10 years but it has never been compatible with the level of complexity in the spreadsheets I create nor compatible with many manuals and a book I have written. The functionality I use is where OO or Libre or the old StarOffice always fall short in terms of compatibility. If not for those very important issues, I would have gone Linux a long time ago.


nevyoung

@196.2.126.x
Am I able to edit of the purchaseable skins?

I have tried the basic skins and am not able to see any change when choosing colours for the various parts of a window. Should I be in High Contrast?

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5
Click for full size
Click for full size
Here's some screen shots.

The second screenshot is from Skin Studio which you need to download if you want to build a skin from scratch but you can use a basic skin and change colors like in the first screen shot. Skin Studio is part of WindowBlinds but it doesn't (or didn't for me) download with Windowblinds. I had to download it separately and it can be irritating in that you can't open it if you don't have the latest version (which I didn't just now when I wanted to make a screenshot) and sometimes it will lose part of your skin when you download and install the latest version. But you have full control of a skin (not just colors) if you do make your own.

It's very late here so I am signing off for now. Hope you can get it to work for you.

There is also an excellent forum for all your questions but I am too tired now to look for the link ( a quick perusal of my Fx bookmarks doesn't see it).
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


plencnerb
Premium
join:2000-09-25
Carpentersville, IL
kudos:3
reply to nevyoung
said by nevyoung :

Thanks for that advice Brian.

Not a problem. Always glad to help out a fellow user of the site.

On a site note, you may want to consider registering with the site. It only takes a few minutes, and it will allow you access to a few features as well, including private IM's between users.

said by nevyoung :

I cannot decide if you are defending MS or also annoyed and exasperated by it. ??

To be honest, I'm not defending MS at all. However, I'm also not annoyed either by what they did with Windows 8.0. Personally, I feel that Microsoft wanted to try to get a piece of the mobile (Tablet, Smartphone, etc) market, which, prior to Windows 8, they really did not have a part of. Instead of creating Windows 8.0 for Smartphones and Tablets, and Windows 8.0 for Laptops and Desktops, they created Windows 8.0 for all devices, yet "pushed" the tablet side of things to try to be like apple.

As we now know, that did not work out as well as they had hoped, and a lot of enterprise users, as well as home users on Desktops and Laptops were very annoyed with the changes that Microsoft brought with Windows 8.0.

I really feel that the changes that Microsoft made were needed to help get them into the mobile marketplace. However, to do that at the sacrifice of the desktop, laptop, and enterprise users may not have been the right choice. I've always said that if Microsoft would have allowed the choice of things from the start, things could have turned out a lot better for Microsoft then they did. By choice, I mean things like allowing the end user the ability to select either the new Windows 8.0 interface (start screen) or allow users to select the well known Start Menu from Windows 7 and prior. Most of the items that Microsoft has put in Windows 8.1 as well as Windows 8.1 Update 1 should have been there from the beginning of Windows 8.0.

With all that being said, I'm also someone who is willing to work with a new OS, and take the time needed to research it, figure it out, and see what changes are there, and how to get around and do the tasks I need. I may take things to an extreme level for a home user, but I actually have a text document that contains the steps that I do when I install Windows 7, and now Windows 8.1 Update 1. Here is a small sample of that document for the install of Windows 8.1 Update 1

4) Modify the Time Zone to be (UTC-06:00) Central Time (US & Canada)
 
5) Unpin all items from the taskbar
 
6) Modify the Taskbar Properties
Taskbar Tab
Taskbar buttons: Never Combine
Notification Area: Always show all icons and notifications on the taskbar
 
Jump Lists Tab
Uncheck "Store and display recently opened items in Jump Lists"
 
7) Open Windows Explorer, and rename "This PC" to "Computer"
 
8) Modify Windows Explorer (View / Options / Change folder and search options)
General Tab
Show favorites (uncheck)
View Tab
Display the full path in the title bar (check)
Show hidden files, folder, and drives (check)
Hide empty drives in the Computer folder (uncheck)
Hide extensions for known types (uncheck)
Use Sharing Wizard (uncheck)
 
9) Disable Hibernation by going to a command prompt, and typing powercfg.exe /hibernate off
 
 

That one contains 82 steps that I do.

So, when I was installing Windows 8.0 for the first time, I used my Windows 7 document as a guide to see what changes I made. I then took the time to see if the change was still something I wanted to do, or if it no longer applied, as well as if there was any new changes to the OS that I would like to make. I probably installed Windows 8.0 a dozen times or more before I had the configuration that I wanted.

said by nevyoung :

This ISP forum is not entirely the forum that I was looking for, but I needed reaction to my rant from any hit relating to my 'I hate Microsoft' theme. I would like to find a forum of reasonably power users who all come up against Win8.1 issues and collectively come up with real solutions, not trivial MVP responses.

If I had the time to search I might find such a forum, but this Win8.1 and Office 2010 'upgrade' has wasted so very much working time that I need to get my head down, my mind right and focus on what I still can do in this new new working environment.

Actually, you are posting this in the Microsoft Forum of the site. This is by far the best place to post questions like this. You can also search this forum for other issues and questions in regards to Windows 8.x. I know there is a lot of posts out there regarding this version of Windows, as well as a lot of real solutions to issues that other members of the site have run into.

Again, I would encourage you to become a member of the site, so that you can take advantage of everything that is offered here. Membership is free, and only takes a few minutes.

--Brian

--
============================
--Brian Plencner

E-Mail: CoasterBrian72Cancer@gmail.com
Note: Kill Cancer to Reply via e-mail


dbmaven
There's no shortage
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Reviews:
·VOIPO
·Optimum Online
said by plencnerb:

Actually, you are posting this in the Microsoft Forum of the site.

The post was originally made in »Rants, Raves, and Praise - and moved here to the Microsoft Forum because of the last word in the Original Post:

Help!

--
Ad astra per alas porci!!

nevyoung

join:2014-04-30
South Africa
dbmaven - that change of forum did confuse me.

Brain - pleasant to find someone else who documents and presumably plans an OS change. I currently have 17 A4 pages of handwritten notes on this conversion to 8.1. I have found few people who can appreciate that, probably because they do not spend at least 12 hours a day at the keyboard, they don't have as many applications, and they either don't need to streamline for productivity or don't know how to. The amount of time I have had to spend on setting up the new PC, encountering bugs and inexplicable changes, googling for answers (and finding many others in the same sad boat) does not make business sense. But what can I do? I am unwillingly a captive of the MS enslaved corporate world.

I would love to know how many settings I make in an OS over a two year period - which is about as long as I can ever run a Win OS without it starting to wobble. I would not be surprised if the number is in many hundreds, perhaps touching a thousand.
What astounds me about MS is that the basic operation of an OS changes so much each time. I wonder if it is the same programming team or company which wrote the previous OS, whether they are writing completely new code. This conversion to 8.1 and to Off2010 (from XP and Off2003) has felt to me as I have felt when trying to become familiar with linux (which I never have done completely due to being forced back to the MS environment).

Now - I have another reason to hate MS. OUtlook 2010 folder arrangement is erratic. The order is not always the same. I am not given an option to change them. I am regularly having to look up and down the list to find a folder. I have 3 accounts and the order of the common folders is not the same. Explanations?

The responses to queries about this are that this is simply how it is! There is no appreciation of the annoyance it creates, nor that this was not the case in previous versions. Does this not show either incompetence, a care less attitude, a lack of attention to detail, insufficient beta testing and plain arrogance?

The PATH problem - besides finding out that the only way to change the PATH was via an administrator command prompt, the annoyances I have described in this thread have not been answered. If I were being a complete idiot and had an obvious solution pointed out to me in each case - well that would make me the broken cog. No - MS is the broken cog and Yes I do hate Microsoft.

Thanks for all your help.


Razzy12345

@69.204.156.x
Every OS has its own oddity. There are things in OS X that baffles the hell out of me.

Also for outlook go to File then Account settings and you can change the order in that Email tab. Is that what you're looking for?

dave, you still on 7? Get with the time.. 8 > 7

nevyoung

join:2014-04-30
South Africa
reply to Mele20
Thanks Mele20. Have downloaded the software but will need to find the time to try them out. Will let you know.
PS: I like the Thomas Jefferson quote: Applies frighteningly to us here in South Africa.

dave
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
reply to Razzy12345
I have real work to do.


plencnerb
Premium
join:2000-09-25
Carpentersville, IL
kudos:3
reply to nevyoung
The reason I document the install process like I do comes from the job that I used to have. I worked in IT, and our group was responsible for the creation of the corporate image.

Back then (probably 2005), we were using Norton Ghost to drop the image onto a system. So, when we would create that ghost image, we had to do it by hand (we had not found an automated solution yet, like Image Ultra). In order to make sure that each time we did the install and configuration exactly the same, I was tasked with the job to document each and every step of the install process, complete with pictures for Windows XP. I don't have the word document anymore, but it was something like 200 pages long when it was all said and done. To make matters worse, we actually had 2 documents: One for a desktop install, and one for a laptop install, as there were differences in drivers and software. The idea was that if there was an issue with Ghost, the deployment team (the people who would actually run the ghost process) could use the manual steps and end up with the exact same install.

My boss always said that if I was ever hit by a bus, someone else should be able to pick up the document, and be able to install (at the time) Windows XP the exact same way that I was doing it. How does one do that? Short of doing a video of the install, we did the next best thing. Document each and every install step so there would be no confusion on the order, setting changes, etc.

The other good thing with this is that if later on issues arose due to an in-house application (as far as it not installing), we could go back and show the development team what we changed from a default install of the OS. It helped troubleshoot things as far as permissions, settings, missing dependencies, and so on.

As I said, Sysprep and the like was available, we just did not know about them at the time.

Because of that work, I took it upon myself to document my own install process. This way, if I was ever working on my systems, or friends and family, I could do the install of a given OS the same way. That allowed me to remember what I did, so if said person came back 6 months later, and said something was broke, I knew how I set up their system to begin with!

--Brian
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--Brian Plencner

E-Mail: CoasterBrian72Cancer@gmail.com
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