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BigNTallOne

join:2011-01-25
Mentor, OH

Best Range Extender for Uverse?

My router is down in my basement. The tech ran an Ethernet connection up to my main tv but my computers are wireless. The signal is great on the first floor, but up in my bedroom Netflix and other streaming can get choppy. Is there a best choice of extenders? Where would I place it? I was kinda thinking up in the hallway of the second floor which is right outside the bedroom, or do you think on the first floor would be best?
I just returned my wireless tv receiver. I probably should have sent back the WAP for it. I take it that its best to disconnect it as only receivers can use it anyway?

nitin00

join:2010-01-17
Stockton, CA
To be honest with you, range extenders are not great for throughput and it reduces speed as it has to repeat the signal and send it back, which reduces the bandwidth in half or even worse. What I would recommend is getting a really good router, like the netgear nighthawk R7000 and plug it in to the RG, it will automatically go in to Access point mode. The router is a pure beast I know a few people that use it and it has the best range of any router and I am talking straight up covering 5-6000 sqft house and backyard to go along with it.


Darknessfall
Premium
join:2012-08-17
kudos:6
Reviews:
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·AT&T U-Verse

2 edits
said by nitin00:

To be honest with you, range extenders are not great for throughput and it reduces speed as it has to repeat the signal and send it back, which reduces the bandwidth in half or even worse. What I would recommend is getting a really good router, like the netgear nighthawk R7000 and plug it in to the RG, it will automatically go in to Access point mode. The router is a pure beast I know a few people that use it and it has the best range of any router and I am talking straight up covering 5-6000 sqft house and backyard to go along with it.

Just as a note:

If you do decide to get a router, make sure you turn off your gateway's wireless and are using channels 1,6, or 11 whenever possible along with 20 MHz.

TexZenFool

join:2005-05-28
Austin, TX
reply to BigNTallOne
And you don't have to put the router in the basement either. If your main TV is more centrally located in your house, put the router there. Just connect it to the RG using the cable that now connects your TV to the RG. Then connect the TV to the router and everything else wireless.


Darknessfall
Premium
join:2012-08-17
kudos:6
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Frontier Communi..
·AT&T U-Verse
said by TexZenFool:

And you don't have to put the router in the basement either. If your main TV is more centrally located in your house, put the router there. Just connect it to the RG using the cable that now connects your TV to the RG. Then connect the TV to the router and everything else wireless.

You shouldn't connect the receiver into a separate router.

gapmn

join:2013-11-10
Saint Paul, MN

1 recommendation

reply to BigNTallOne
I would go for the ASUS RT-N66U router. Go to Amazon and read the reviews.

nitin00

join:2010-01-17
Stockton, CA
Nice router but ease of use and automatically going in to AP mode is the best thing with netgears. Range is absolutely the best with the nighthawk r7000. I used to have the RT-N66U, it still lacked in 5ghz range but now days if your gonna spend on that might as well get the AC router and new highend ones use alot powerful amplifiers. Only reason i recommend the netgear is because you don't have to mess with it since it has auto AP mode.

BigNTallOne

join:2011-01-25
Mentor, OH
reply to BigNTallOne
Ummm, really liking the reviews on the Nighthawk but have questions. You recommended plugging it into the RG, but I was thinking of placing it up on the first floor as I have a ethernet cable that runs there. (Not sure why Darknessfall discourages putting the receiver into a seperate router. I have done it for over a year without the slightest problem). I was thinking the central location would improve range. Am I missing something? 5 Ghz mode is especially susceptible to walls and distance from what I've read.
So, I take it a 5 ghz only network isn't practical? Many cell phones can't use it? Would I want to force the upstairs laptop to use 5 ghz for best streaming?
Thanks for your comments.


Darknessfall
Premium
join:2012-08-17
kudos:6
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Frontier Communi..
·AT&T U-Verse

1 edit
said by BigNTallOne:

Ummm, really liking the reviews on the Nighthawk but have questions. You recommended plugging it into the RG, but I was thinking of placing it up on the first floor as I have a ethernet cable that runs there. (Not sure why Darknessfall discourages putting the receiver into a seperate router. I have done it for over a year without the slightest problem). I was thinking the central location would improve range. Am I missing something? 5 Ghz mode is especially susceptible to walls and distance from what I've read.
So, I take it a 5 ghz only network isn't practical? Many cell phones can't use it? Would I want to force the upstairs laptop to use 5 ghz for best streaming?
Thanks for your comments.

I say not to put a receiver onto a router because you'll be flooding your network since most routers don't filter out the multicast packets. You'll be sending random STB packets to any other device connected to it. It destroys anything that's not very powerful since it won't be able to easily keep throwing them all away.

If you're say, connecting a laptop to a router with a receiver running HD on it, you'll be losing 7 Mbps or so of maximum bandwidth since your laptop will have to keep responding to those random packets. You'll also pretty much destroy the battery life of anything connected to it since it'll have to constantly have wireless running.

5 GHz is only good if your current 2.4 GHz network has a high signal, but low throughput. If your 2.4 GHz is already a low signal, your 5 GHz is probably going to be even lower. Most higher end phones support 5 GHz, but many others do not.

TexZenFool

join:2005-05-28
Austin, TX
Darknessfall - that makes sense though I don't know enough to completely understand it.

Question for you - I'm currently using an old Buffalo Airstation WZR-HP-G300-NH2 to extend Wifi from my RG and connect and a few wired devices. My only TV is connected wired to the Buffalo, but it's in AP mode so not routing - effectively working as just a switch I believe.

Does this still cause the same problem with random STB packets?


Darknessfall
Premium
join:2012-08-17
kudos:6
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Frontier Communi..
·AT&T U-Verse
said by TexZenFool:

Darknessfall - that makes sense though I don't know enough to completely understand it.

Question for you - I'm currently using an old Buffalo Airstation WZR-HP-G300-NH2 to extend Wifi from my RG and connect and a few wired devices. My only TV is connected wired to the Buffalo, but it's in AP mode so not routing - effectively working as just a switch I believe.

Does this still cause the same problem with random STB packets?

Yes, unless the switch on the router is capable of IGMP snooping and such.


brookeKrige

join:2012-11-05
San Jose, CA
kudos:3
reply to BigNTallOne
said by BigNTallOne:

placing it up on the first floor as I have a ethernet cable that runs there

Just one, same one tech ran for the main TV? Whenever you have opportunity to run one ethernet, always run 2 or 3.

If your own 1st floor router wasn't itself uverse multicast suitable, you can still interpose a suitable switch there on 1st floor, just before your router. So one LAN port of switch goes to TV, another to your router (i.e. your router mounted on the 1st floor ceiling, right?); and neither router nor its clients ever see the TV traffic.

»Inexpensive 4/8 port switch with IGMP snooping v1/v2/v3 and IGMP querier?

On my Asus's status LEDs I can confirm (via flickering) when there's significant traffic on the WAN, on each wifi radio freq., or any LAN port. If I had uverse TV, that would trivially tell me if wifi or LAN ports were being flooded or not with unwanted traffic.

nitin00

join:2010-01-17
Stockton, CA
reply to BigNTallOne
said by BigNTallOne:

Ummm, really liking the reviews on the Nighthawk but have questions. You recommended plugging it into the RG, but I was thinking of placing it up on the first floor as I have a ethernet cable that runs there. (Not sure why Darknessfall discourages putting the receiver into a seperate router. I have done it for over a year without the slightest problem). I was thinking the central location would improve range. Am I missing something? 5 Ghz mode is especially susceptible to walls and distance from what I've read.
So, I take it a 5 ghz only network isn't practical? Many cell phones can't use it? Would I want to force the upstairs laptop to use 5 ghz for best streaming?
Thanks for your comments.

As long as the cable is running from rg it's good. 5ghz range used to suck on the routers when they first came out. But now on the new ones they are one fine. Especially the Nighthawk is designed using the new amplifiers and it matches the 2.4ghz range in some instances they place more focus on it. The range shouldn't be an issue on the 5ghz with the Nighthawk.


joako
Premium
join:2000-09-07
/dev/null
kudos:6
reply to BigNTallOne
Quickest/simplest solution is get something like this at both ends of the DVR cable:




And then plug in a wireless access point or a router with the router functions disabled next to the DVR. You probably can disable the RG Wifi if you don't use Wifi in the basement.

Another option is keep the Uverse 5ghz AP and connect a dual mode router/AP configured as a client to the 5Ghz AP and broadcast on the 2.4ghz. This is the only way to reliably configure any Wifi repeater.

Of course the best solution would be to run a cable to the second floor and setup an access point there. In any case if you are running multiple access points make sure you set them on opposite channels with the same SSID and WPA2 AES settings (TKIP and/or mixed mode is insecure -- don't use it.) and disable the routing and DHCP functions.
--
PRescott7-2097


dbeatson
Premium
join:2001-02-22
Clover, SC
reply to BigNTallOne
I have tried several and I now just use a wireless set-top box the Ethernet port on the back is active, you can hook a switch to it and run multiple devices off of it, I have my XBOX one plugged in this way and I get 42Mbps download and 5.60Mbps upload on the XBOX One Speed Test, almost the same as on an Ethernet connection.

So if you have a wireless receiver I would try that.
--
»www.w4lny.com

BigNTallOne

join:2011-01-25
Mentor, OH
reply to BigNTallOne
dbeatson, I used to do plug into my wired DVR through the Ethernet and thought the results were fantastic.

BigNTallOne

join:2011-01-25
Mentor, OH

1 edit
reply to BigNTallOne
Option D: Ethernet lines are bi-directional, so if there's a line running up to the first floor, I can relocate the gateway there. I can replace the configuration in the basement with a router or switch (and I already have a switch I'm not using). I think I will give that a shot and see if I can save the cost of a new router.

BigNTallOne

join:2011-01-25
Mentor, OH
reply to BigNTallOne
Nah, that's a brain fart. The Uverse line doesn't enter the house as an ethernet line so I can't just shuffle everything. It seems to enter as a DSL line so the switch would have have that type of input (and not get rejected by Uverse's security) to work.
I have no idea why they had a line connected to the Phone lines 1 & 2 jack. I don't have their phone service. I'm leaving that disconnected.
I guess I do have to buy a wireless router unless someone can think of a way to make that idea work.
Currently, my Magic Jack, a line that runs to our Xbox, and a line that runs to the first floor connect on the yellow ethernet ports. (p.s. I currently don't have tv service. The ethernet line to the first floor is just being used for internet)


brookeKrige

join:2012-11-05
San Jose, CA
kudos:3
Ideally ATT would run a new home run cat5e from NID to a dedicated 1st floor jack for you, and you would have specified/requested that at initial install time. At this point, suspect they would charge you if they make the change.

Consider also today's gateways lack as I recall: 5GHz wifi, uPnP, user configurable QoS... How long before you purchase your own router because of such limitations?

In bad old days, DSL & POTS on same phone lines went to regular phone internal wiring, and you could simply put the modem/gateway anywhere there's a phone jack in the house (and isolate real phones with a DSL filter). Today due to speed demands, the house wiring should be kept totally isolated from DSL "data", or in case of POTS, isolated by a whole-house filter in the NID.

What speed tier do you have? Do you have pair-bonding? Post your gateway's broadband/status info (minus publicIP). If your stats have enough headroom (enough noise margin, and max sync rate) then no sweat to "hack" that ethernet to 1st floor, to "extend" your DSL line from basement to the 1st floor, to relocate gateway to the 1st floor. Yet a chance you're on the edge, where the extra length and connectors would necessitate dropping down a speed tier, for example; or those extras might disqualify you from future speed upgrades...

But for best quality DSL signal, one prefers to minimize DSL line length between VRAD and NID, and between NID and RG, and regardless of length also have as close as possible to one continuous cat5e from NID to RG, else minimizing the number of jacks or connectors.

BigNTallOne

join:2011-01-25
Mentor, OH
reply to BigNTallOne
K, I'm about to go to work. I will try and figure out how to post all that after work. Basically, you're looking to see everything on the Broadband - Status tab?