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Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to scross

Re: [Electrical] USB charger outlet failed

said by scross:

I expect these type of things to become pretty much standard equipment in new homes before too long, if they aren't already. I also expect - giving the growth of LED lighting - that low-voltage, DC lighting circuits will become standard equipment. This would simply such lighting considerably, leading to further cost reductions. General low-voltage, DC outlets might also become quite common, given that much of our electronic equipment also runs on such voltage; this would eliminate a lot of wall warts and other power adapters and such.

I think you may be right about the charging ports but I don't think you'll see low-voltage DC lighting circuits. What everybody wants for lighting is so varied that restricting them to one type of system wouldn't fly in most cases. There isn't a significant amount of the lighting fixtures available that operate on low-voltage DC.
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tschmidt
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join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
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said by Msradell:

I don't think you'll see low-voltage DC lighting circuits.

Interesting, I agree.

Having said that I'm redoing our outdoor floodlights and motion sensors to operate from 12V DC so I don't have to run mains cable outside and to our shed.

/tom

scross

join:2002-09-13
Cordova, TN
reply to Msradell
said by Msradell:

I think you may be right about the charging ports but I don't think you'll see low-voltage DC lighting circuits. What everybody wants for lighting is so varied that restricting them to one type of system wouldn't fly in most cases. There isn't a significant amount of the lighting fixtures available that operate on low-voltage DC.

Well, I didn't necessarily mean INSTEAD OF existing wiring, but rather IN ADDITION TO - in the sense that it's easy enough to run some additional low-voltage DC wiring at the same time you're putting in everything else. Then you would have the flexibility to do whatever you wanted to here. As far as something like that just never happening, emerging standards, government regulations, and basic economics might eventually lead the situation in the other direction. Expansion of solar installations might also play a role here, since these provide DC by default and have to be converted to AC otherwise, which is expensive (for the conversion equipment) and wasteful.