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laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
reply to berkshireman

Re: [Masonry] Fence Posts, Postcrete and water

Wow do I ever need you guys!

I have an existing split rail fence, and the two cedar wood posts at the swinging gate itself are in concrete, but the concrete is well below the surface of the soil i.e. about 8 or 10 inches (I dug the soil out from around these posts--did so because they were starting to wiggle and I want to install an automatic operator on them). The posts suffered some 1 or 2 inch diameter damage, but otherwise are still strong/sturdy maybe 8" posts and I want to keep them. I'd thought I would wrap the damaged area that I exposed with that heavy black material that is used for roof edging--I forget what it's called but it looks like tar paper. And then I wanted to "postcrete" and slope-away where before there was just soil with accompanying moisture retention thus rotting problem. Does this seem a good approach? I really do NOT want to take these posts out--I expect they can last another 10 years easy if not 20...

I also have a game fence (8' tall) with heavy 3" steel 10' posts sunk 2' into the ground, and one of them has pushed-up badly (heavy clay, rock, and caliche "soil" here) and I want to try to get it back down again. I'm thinking about sledge-hammering the inverted bell of concrete at the base, so I might get down under the post and dig out whatever is pushing-up and get the post back down again. This without disconnecting or loosening the high-tension deer fencing it supports.

Any thoughts about these issues are indeed welcome! And apologies to the OP if I've taken this too far OT!


berkshireman

@46.235.152.x
Thank you all of you for your valuable replies. With mixed replies, at least I am not confused anymore, I understand how these things work. You guys are great.


mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX
reply to laserfan
said by laserfan:

I also have a game fence (8' tall) with heavy 3" steel 10' posts sunk 2' into the ground, and one of them has pushed-up badly (heavy clay, rock, and caliche "soil" here) and I want to try to get it back down again. I'm thinking about sledge-hammering the inverted bell of concrete at the base, so I might get down under the post and dig out whatever is pushing-up and get the post back down again. This without disconnecting or loosening the high-tension deer fencing it supports.

Any thoughts about these issues are indeed welcome! And apologies to the OP if I've taken this too far OT!

Your going to have to dig that up and resink it to have success.

laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
said by mityfowl:

Your going to have to dig that up and resink it to have success.

Yeah that's what I meant by digging underneath it. As it stands it is actually being pulled-down by the fence it "supports" so I'm thinking if I can dig under it I can get it to drop into place. Must be popped-up at least 5 inches, breaking the weld on a cross-support!


slaker

@50.138.50.x
for laserfan,
first question, just pour the additional concrete around the damaged area. if you want you can treat that bad area first with anything water sealant, like tar or varnish or roof cement.
second question,

with a little kludging, the easiest way to excavate under the concrete is hydraulic drilling.
just get a length of 1/2" pvc pipe, to which you have glued a female hose fitting, and a shorter length of say 1" pipe, that the 1/2" pipe will slide into easily. attach a garden hose to the 1/2" pipe, run the water. push them both into the soil near the post. the water will loosen the underground soil, and the water with the soil will come up and out through the gap between the two pipes. when the excavation is big enough, the post with concrete will settle by itself.

laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
Thanks a lot slaker for your replies. I'd have never thought of "hydraulic drilling". I may have some trouble getting water to the site, and I expect the rockiness may cause it not to work, but it's worth a try for sure.

We certainly have had a very extended period of drought here (several years now) and while I'd hoped for heavy rains to get the posts to "settle" (I have two that are popped actually, tho one is worse than the other) the idea to inject water under pressure and flushing soil/clay out has merit. Thanks.


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
reply to berkshireman
said by berkshireman :

With mixed replies, at least I am not confused anymore...

If it's any consolation, flip a coin and do it one way or the other and you should be okay. Whatever route you take, no need to tell anyone here lest those who said to do it the "other" way will give you grief.