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fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside

I don't want to play nice...

Is there any wireless router for the greedy Scrooge in all of us? I want it to prioritize MY traffic over other peoples' traffic. Preferably wireless N or even the new AC. My current router keeps falling back because of all the wireless traffic in my neighborhood since it likes being a neighborly wireless router.


billaustin
they call me Mr. Bill
Premium,MVM
join:2001-10-13
North Las Vegas, NV
kudos:5

1 recommendation

It's part of the wireless protocol, it listens before transmitting. You will get the same behavior on any wireless router. The only thing you can do is get a dual-band router and move your gear to the 5ghz range, or switch to wired connections.


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
I thought I read that when 802.11n came out that there were some routers that would obliterate traffic around them since they weren't following protocol on how the device should work?


billaustin
they call me Mr. Bill
Premium,MVM
join:2001-10-13
North Las Vegas, NV
kudos:5

1 recommendation

I have not heard of any that do that. Some have adjustable power output, but they still follow protocol. The FCC rules governing use of the frequency ranges stipulate that you cannot intentionally create interference for others, and you must accept any interference that exists for you. Your only legal options are to switch frequency bands or go wired. You could also look into other options, like signal-blocking paint or metal siding.

PrntRhd
Premium
join:2004-11-03
Fairfield, CA
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to fartness
Maybe you should try changing the channel of your router.
Default channels are 1, 6 and 11.
More:
»supportforums.cisco.com/document···-network

Were you thinking about "channel bonding"?
»compnetworking.about.com/od/wire···mbps.htm


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside

1 edit
I've done a site survey and it doesn't make a difference on what channel is used since I pickup probably 40 different APs. I'll have to do some digging but what I read a while back was the channel bonding basically wasn't acting how it should and it would use all channels and almost DoS all neighborhood traffic. Also another example would be the router senses other networks but doesn't fall back to lower speeds as it should and it still uses more than one channel instead of only using one when traffic is detected.


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside

1 edit
Read:
»www.zdnet.com/blog/ou/how-to-jam···ally/247

This is likely what I read years ago and is what I'm referring to. Do new n or ac routers play nice compared to the ones mentioned in the article?


CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
reply to fartness
If they were not following protocol then they weren't n routers.


mozerd
Light Will Pierce The Darkness
Premium,MVM
join:2004-04-23
Nepean, ON

1 edit
reply to fartness
said by fartness:

Read:
»www.zdnet.com/blog/ou/how-to-jam···ally/247

This is likely what I read years ago and is what I'm referring to. Do new n or ac routers play nice compared to the ones mentioned in the article?

With the Netgear R6300 or the R7000 you can lock in 40 Mhz which in effect will freeze your neighbor's out however if your neighbors also acquire the same Netgear Routers and learn to lock in 40 Mhz then you'd be in the same boat. Not sure how much longer Netgear will allow this kind of locking since coexistence is what it is

The major problem however is that the "industry" has embraced Beamforming MIMO [versus Spatial Multiplexing MIMO OFDM Technology] because Beamforming MIMO is much cheaper to implement and profit margins are much fatter for everyone in the selling chain. With Spatial Multiplexing MIMO OFDM Technology interference mitigation is far superior pus a host of other positives to numerous for me to mention but due to costs [licensing Airgo signal processing technology] most have dropped out of the Spatial Multiplexing builds. Airgo is now owned by QUALCOMM and Qualcomm have determined that Airgo tech [True MIMO] is too difficult to sell to the masses.
--
David Mozer
IT-Expert on Call
Information Technology for Home and Business


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
I've been considering the R7000. Most neighbors are likely using $30 Walmart routers so I doubt there's too many $180 routers out there for me to compete with. Do any home wireless routers use the latter technology that you mentioned?


mozerd
Light Will Pierce The Darkness
Premium,MVM
join:2004-04-23
Nepean, ON

1 edit
Unfortunately not. If you go with the R7000 make sure to get the latest firmware from Netgear - Firmware Version 1.0.3.24 (802.11ac Wi-Fi CERTIFIED)


CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
reply to fartness
Price has nothing to do with with how well they will fight with each other.


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
The $180 R7000 will fight much better if it can lock 40mhz. My point was that a $30 router will not have that feature.


Bill_MI
Bill In Michigan
Premium,MVM
join:2001-01-03
Royal Oak, MI
kudos:2
Have you looked/surveyed 5GHz? You might be surprised. If you have, ignore this.


former qwest

join:2014-01-04
out there
Reviews:
·CenturyLink
if saturation is a concern, you could also try a powerline router (many companies make them, not fronting Netgear, just the first link i found) »www.netgear.com/home/products/ne···werline/


Semaphore
Premium
join:2003-11-18
101010
kudos:1
reply to fartness
What are you going to do about the OTHER half of the relationship ? Replace all your *end devices* with the same spectrum hogging chipset ?


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
reply to Bill_MI
Yes I currently have a 802.11a/g wireless router. Very few of my devices use .11a anymore and most are .11n so it's been time for me to upgrade for awhile. I've always used and preferred .11a for the past 9 years.


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
reply to Semaphore
said by Semaphore:

What are you going to do about the OTHER half of the relationship ? Replace all your *end devices* with the same spectrum hogging chipset ?

Yes, to some extent. See above post. Right now I only have one end device that supports AC, but at least I will get the N capability for my other devices with a new router.


Anonymous_
Anonymous
Premium
join:2004-06-21
127.0.0.1
kudos:2
reply to fartness
Get a HIgh powered Wifi router

normally these tend to over write other routers.


Semaphore
Premium
join:2003-11-18
101010
kudos:1
reply to fartness
What you are asking for - a device that does not observe FCC regulations for public bands; interference caused and accepted - or as you put it one that prioritizes YOUR traffic over ALL other traffic - will not be found in any legally available chipset. .b/g/n/ac, or otherwise. So no off the shelf router is not going to suite your criteria.


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
What about from that article I linked?


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
reply to Anonymous_
said by Anonymous_:

Get a HIgh powered Wifi router

normally these tend to over write other routers.

I thought FCC limits the maximum power?


Anonymous_
Anonymous
Premium
join:2004-06-21
127.0.0.1
kudos:2
27dbi is the recommend since each additional dbi has a significant increase of power

»Wireless ISP FAQ »How does one convert Watts to dBm?

27dbi = 500mw

30dbi = 1watt


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
What were you implying with your OP? Consumer or enterprise?


Anonymous_
Anonymous
Premium
join:2004-06-21
127.0.0.1
kudos:2
Most limit it to 400mw +3dbi gain antennas. this is the higher end stuff

low end consumer stuff limits to 21dbi + antenna gain

so 21dbi +7dbi high gain would put you at 28dbi
--
Live Free or Die Hard...


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
What is the R7000? I also see Linksys WRT1900AC is either released or going to be released soon. Not sure how that will compare with the R7000.


mozerd
Light Will Pierce The Darkness
Premium,MVM
join:2004-04-23
Nepean, ON
MIMO systems especially 3x3 and upcoming 4x4 have very specialized antennas that are TUNED so I suggest not to get too caught up in "gain" game as the rules for MIMO change how the game is played dramatically. Some Vendors play the mental game where external antennas are offered to appeal to people who want to believe that they get an EDGE when in fact they do NOT where MIMO is concerned. For the OUTDOORS external antennas do play an important role but MIMO acts very differently outdoors than it does indoors due to MULTIPATH. Indoors multipath has a role to play in the MIMO world whereas outdoors multipath has very different characteristics. MIMO exploits multipath. Multipath used to be the enemy until "they" found a way to exploit it.

The Linksys WRT1900AC looks nice to the geeks but its not a good performer from my perspective whereas the Netgear R7000 is a screamer. And if you like the mind games vendors are playing the R7000 does have external antennas.
--
David Mozer
IT-Expert on Call
Information Technology for Home and Business


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to fartness
Describe your general conditions in your house (walls, construction type, etc), location of your router, your local neighborhood (single-story, multi-story, apts, etc), and what devices you are using.


Semaphore
Premium
join:2003-11-18
101010
kudos:1
reply to fartness
said by fartness:

What about from that article I linked?

lol, it's from 2006 dood.


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
said by Semaphore:

said by fartness:

What about from that article I linked?

lol, it's from 2006 dood.

The concept still applies.