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John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8

TrueCrypt Drive Not Shown

I did a full disk encryption on an external HD, and the drive would show as G: in Explorer. Data transferred...everything working good for weeks. I unmount the encrypted drive and exit TrueCrypt before turning off the laptop.

I turn on the laptop today, and run TrueCrypt. In selecting the device I see that the normal G: assignment is gone, but the disk is shown without a drive letter assignment. I tried to mount the device...it says that it needs to be formatted. Not going there...

The drive looks good...acts normally. No ugly sounds. Hmmm...

Any idea why the drive letter would not be showing, yet the drive is still indicated? Is it possible to re-assign the drive letter to the drive?

TIA
--
When money men rain from the skies and shadow coins fly across the planet, then shall the New City fall into disgrace. Fortune and power dissipated like scraps of green paper. Look out below.


GuruGuy

join:2002-12-16
Atlanta, GA
When you open True Crypt, select G or any of the available drives. then choose select file and navigate to the network location of your drive. Then choose mount and enter your password.
--
GuruGuy

Ken1943

join:2001-12-30
Denver, CO
reply to John Galt
Both esata drives I use for backups did not have a drive letter assigned. Windows 8 and used once a month before MS updates. This has been an on going problem over the years with usb and esata drives.

It's not a TrueCrypt problem.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to GuruGuy
No joy...error message saying 'not found'.

GuruGuy

join:2002-12-16
Atlanta, GA
said by John Galt:

No joy...error message saying 'not found'.

At what step in the process did you get this message?
--
GuruGuy

Frodo

join:2006-05-05
kudos:1
reply to John Galt
If you have Windows 7, maybe KB2952664 is the culprit. I installed it as a standalone update and wound up restoring to the restore point prior to installing it. I was getting device driver installing messages and wound up losing my CD drive. Device manager, Disk Drives looked like a mess. I'm glad my computer wasn't bricked. It certainly changes things disk drive wise.

Once backed out, everything returned to normal. Update KB2952664.

I hid that update, but Microsoft unhid the update, and if not given a heads up here, would have installed it again during the recent updates yesterday. Again, I believe this only applies to Windows 7.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to GuruGuy
Here is the actual screenshot...I still don't see the drive indicated in WE. When I mount it, it prombts for the password, I enter that and this is the result.




John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to Frodo
The machine in question is running XP...I did a restore to a week ago. No change.

GuruGuy

join:2002-12-16
Atlanta, GA
reply to John Galt
said by John Galt:

Here is the actual screenshot...I still don't see the drive indicated in WE. When I mount it, it prombts for the password, I enter that and this is the result.

Why doesn't you path look more like this:

\\Username\External Drive Name\Encrypted Partition

And why do you keep saying windows explorer. Your not using explorer to navigate there from this window. You wont see it in explorer...it's encrypted and invisible to windows.
--
GuruGuy

GuruGuy

join:2002-12-16
Atlanta, GA
reply to John Galt
Walk me step by step how you are getting to that point in your screenshot. Did you follow my steps.
--
GuruGuy


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to GuruGuy
Normally I see the G: drive indicating that it is available in WE. It does not mount now...nothing. I plugged in a similar drive and it shows up normally. The drive in question does NOT show up in WE now, even though it did in the past.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to GuruGuy
said by GuruGuy:

Why doesn't you path look more like this:

\\Username\External Drive Name\Encrypted Partition

I have no idea...that is the mystery.

Frodo

join:2006-05-05
kudos:1
reply to John Galt
I see in the help
quote:
PROBLEM:
A TrueCrypt volume cannot be mounted; TrueCrypt reports “Incorrect password or not a TrueCrypt volume.
POSSIBLE CAUSE:
The volume header may have been damaged by a third-party application or malfunctioning hardware component.
POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS:
· If you created your volume using TrueCrypt 6.0 or later, you can try to restore the volume header from the backup embedded in the volume by following these steps:
1) Run TrueCrypt 6.0 or later.
2) Click Select Device or Select File to select your volume.
3) Select Tools > Restore Volume Header.
I don't know what you should do, since I don't do disk encryption. But that is what the help says. Might want to take a look at the help file included with Truecrypt.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
That was one of the first things that I tried...

I'm beginning to think that what Ken1943 See Profile said is the cause...that there is some issue with the USB controller on the drive. All of my other USB gear seems to work (some of the other drives are the same type/style, but different capacities) so in that respect it isn't like there is a dead USB controller on the MB.

I don't think the data is corrupted or the drive itself is damaged. It just sits on the desk and is not banged around or subjected to over-temp conditions.

I'll probably just buy another similar drive and swap the controllers. I do need the data, so it is worth that expense.

Mister_E

join:2004-04-02
Etobicoke, ON
Reviews:
·Bell Sympatico
reply to John Galt
Have you tried re-assigning a drive letter (G:) to the drive through Disk Management?

Disk Management Info for XP

How to change drive letter assignments in Windows XP

bkjohnson
Premium
join:2002-05-22
Birmingham, AL
reply to John Galt
Have you tried the drive on another computer?


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to Mister_E
Yes...it shows as "unallocated", then I "allocate" the drive, but cannot assign a drive letter to it. On right-click there is no option to assign a drive letter, and no other way to do so in the interface.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to bkjohnson
Same result as the laptop. Moved the other USB drives over to the other computer and tested, they all show up fine.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to John Galt
I think if I do an encrypted drive again, I'll just do an encrypted folder rather than encrypting the entire drive. That -might- be easier to deal with...

Mister_E

join:2004-04-02
Etobicoke, ON
reply to John Galt
When you right click the drive in Disk Management, the option "Change Drive Letter and Paths" isn't available or greyed out? If so, are you logged in as an administrator?

bkjohnson
Premium
join:2002-05-22
Birmingham, AL
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to John Galt
I have recently had a situation where a USB drive converted to Truecrypt (whole drive) would not show up in "my computer" and could not be found in "select device" by Truecrypt after a cold boot, but then would show up after following the cold boot with a restart, with the drive still connected. Don't know why but it seems to have happened after a Windows update. Op system on the machine is Vista Business. Seems to be different from your situation, but I thought I would pass it along.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to Mister_E
Not available...

Logged in as Admin.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to bkjohnson
Tried that too...no luck.

GuruGuy

join:2002-12-16
Atlanta, GA
reply to John Galt
said by John Galt:

I think if I do an encrypted drive again, I'll just do an encrypted folder rather than encrypting the entire drive. That -might- be easier to deal with...

That's exactly what I usually do. Create a large encrypted partition on a drive, then mount that partition when I need to access it. I have several terabyte drives that are 90% encrypted, the other 10% left as a normal formatted drive.
--
GuruGuy


OldCableGuy3

@207.191.193.x
reply to John Galt
>it shows as "unallocated", then I "allocate" the drive, but cannot assign a drive letter to it.

When you selected allocate on the drive you overwrote part of Truecrypt header on the drive which contains the key. You're never going to be able to access that drive again.

You need to start over, format it FAT32 or NTFS and create a truecrypt file container that is 99% of the size of the drive. Use that from now on. Name it ENCRYPTED.TC Although TrueCrypt can do FDE like you have done, it is extremely tempermental and even plugging the drive in to a computer and letting Windows try to auto mount it has been known to overwrite the sectors at the beginning of the drive.

For future reference, never ever ever touch an encrypted drive with Computer Management.

dantz

join:2005-05-09
Honolulu, HI
reply to John Galt
said by John Galt:

I turn on the laptop today, and run TrueCrypt.

How do you normally do this? Do you click on AutoMount Devices? Or do you click on Select Device and then manually select the desired device?

Your screenshot shows that you are attempting to mount \Device\Harddisk2\Partition0 to available drive letter "G" and that your password is not being accepted, and thus you are unable to mount the volume.

You seem to expect your encrypted volume's drive letter to automatically appear in Windows Explorer even before it has been mounted, but that's not how it works. You have to open the TrueCrypt interface and successfully mount the volume to a free drive letter before it will show up in Explorer. (It doesn't have to be G, it can be any drive letter that you choose. And this will normally be a different drive letter than the one that Windows automatically assigns to the physical device.)

said by John Galt:

Yes...it shows as "unallocated", then I "allocate" the drive,

Don't do that! Never initialize, partition or format a disk that contains a TrueCrypt device-hosted volume or you will risk causing serious damage to the volume. Many volumes are lost this way. Fortunately the embedded backup header might still be good.

This could very well be a software issue and not a hardware problem. Maybe we can figure out what's gone wrong. The first step is to figure out what it was that you encrypted, as the recovery procedures will be quite different based upon the type of volume that has been lost. Did you encrypt an entire raw disk, or did you encrypt an existing partition on the disk? Another way to ask the same question: Before you set up the encrypted volume, did you begin with a raw, unallocated disk? Or did you start out with an initialized, partitioned disk?

In the Select Device screen, I see in your screenshot that you recently selected "Harddisk 2". This represents a fully-encrypted raw disk which contains no partitions. (If you attempted to view the disk in Disk Management, Windows would offer to initialize the drive. Don't do this, by the way.)

But the question is, have you always selected your volume as "Harddisk 2", or (back when it was working) did you used to select a partition under Harddisk 2, a partition that is no longer listed? For example: "\Device\Harddisk2\Partition1". Is that what you used to select?

Or perhaps you merely clicked on AutoMount and let TrueCrypt figure it out. In that case you would see either Partition0 or Partition1 listed in the selected volume screen. Do you recall whether or not that selection has recently changed from P1 to P0?

If so, then this would explain your current situation. You lost or damaged the partition table, and TrueCrypt can no longer find the encrypted volume because the partition boundaries are no longer defined. If this is the case then the volume might still be recoverable.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
I have numerous USB drives attached to the laptop. The 1TB drive I wanted to use was assigned G: by XP.

I prepared the drive in question by doing a full format on the drive. I ran TC and encrypted the entire single partition on the drive.

When I want to use that drive, I start TC, select drive T: (an arbitrary assignment) and select "Select Device". The window opens and I see (saw) drive G: listed with the size indicated as 931 GB, and (as you mentioned) also saw \Device\Harddisk2\Partition1 (or whatever it was, but in this format).

I selected that, and clicked "Mount". I was prompted for the password, entered that and then TC mounted and indicated that the drive was ready to access.

After use and when ready to shut down, click "Dismount All" and then exited TC, finished my normal routine for the system cleanup, then then laptop is shut down.

This process had been working fine for months. Until it did not...

As I mentioned, the drive in question showed as drive G: in My Computer every time I opened WE. It shows no drive connected other than C: (main HD) and D: (DVD) now, despite the drive being plugged in. All of the other drives are disconnected for now, so they don't show up. The drive in question powers up normally, the activity light works, and it doesn't make any noises that are unusual.

When I looked at it in Drive Management, it said 'unallocated'. So I 'allocated' it and immediately got a prompt that it was "unformatted...would I like to format it now?" I clicked No. There was no drive activity light during this, so as to whether or not it has been buggered up (further) remains to be seen.
--
A is A



OldCableGuy3

@207.191.193.x

1 recommendation

It has been. When you selected to Allocate it overwrote what it believed was the partition table. There is a 2nd key stored in the middle of the drive, but recovery of this is very advanced.

In the future don't encrypt full partitions, create an encrypted file container.

dantz

join:2005-05-09
Honolulu, HI
reply to John Galt
It doesn't matter what the drive letters are. The drive letters can change anytime. What matters is what you select in TrueCrypt's "Select Device" screen.

You said that you encrypted a partition, so that's what you should be selecting in the Select Device screen. However, your screenshot shows that you have been selecting a raw, unpartitioned drive (which is what "Partition0" indicates). That's the problem. You've apparently lost your partition definition, so the lost partition is no longer showing up in the Select Device screen.

This happens to a lot of users. Windows has a nasty habit of altering or deleting partitions that it doesn't understand. There are a lot of ways that this can happen. Sometimes you will be prompted first, but under certain conditions it can happen without prompting.

Anyway, if you intend to mount an encrypted partition, but you select the entire disk instead, then TrueCrypt will not be able to find the desired volume and it will display the "incorrect password or not a TrueCrypt volume" message. That's normal behavior.

Your volume might still be recoverable. Try this:

Download the evaluation copy of WinHex (or any other hex editor if you prefer a different one, but I will describe how to do this in WinHex).

Tools: Open Disk: Physical Media: [select your external drive from the list]

Are there any partitions listed in the Directory Browser screen? (Probably not, is my guess)

Make sure your offsets are displaying in Decimal mode, not Hexadecimal mode, otherwise the offset numbers will be different. If desired you can click in the offset column to toggle back and forth. If you do so then please end up in Decimal mode. (The top row should all be numbers such as 0-15, not 0-F).

If the lost partition was formatted using Windows XP then it probably used to begin at offset 32256 (decimal). Go to that offset and see if you can spot a transition between plaintext data (probably a large block of zeros) and a gigantic block of totally random data. That's what the beginning of encrypted partition sometimes looks like.

If you can't find the beginning then we might be able to find the end instead, but it won't be as easy.

Sorry to throw you into the "deep end" by going right into hex editing, but if you can learn how to use it then this will probably be the simplest way to recover your volume.


sivran
Vive Vivaldi
Premium
join:2003-09-15
Irving, TX
kudos:1
reply to John Galt
OldCableGuy is right.