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Medar

join:2002-02-28
Edmond, OK

[OK] Regular Repeated Packet Loss in N OKC

So every 1-3 minutes (enough to be highly irritating and knock you offline) I ave been experiencing major packet loss. This does not "appear" to be anything inside my household...but curious if those of you smarter than me in the networking world could comment on the below pasted data. This is typical trace info:

Target Name: www.cox.net
IP: 68.99.123.161
Date/Time: 6/12/2014 8:31:10 PM to 6/12/2014 8:31:56 PM

Hop Sent Err PL% Min Max Avg Host Name / [IP]
1 10 0 0.0 0 0 0 [192.168.1.1]
2 10 1 10.0 7 25 13 [10.7.192.1]
3 10 0 0.0 7 24 12 COX-68-12-10-166-static.coxinet.net [68.12.10.166]
4 10 1 10.0 9 15 11 [68.12.14.3]
5 10 3 30.0 10 25 13 mtc3dsrj02-ae4.0.rd.ok.cox.net [68.12.14.2]
6 10 1 10.0 34 51 40 dukedsrj01-ge-210.0.rd.at.cox.net [68.1.1.121]
7 10 0 0.0 34 51 38 [68.1.15.234]
8 10 2 20.0 35 49 37 [68.99.123.4]
9 10 3 30.0 35 44 37 ww2.cox.com [68.99.123.161]


The packet loss does not always begin at 10.7.192.1 - but that is as early in the hops as it will show up. Often I redline and am 100% packet loss from that point (or hop 3) a few times within a 10 minute period.

Any thoughts on what I am dealing with? I have another technician coming to the house...but the last one said everything was fine.

Hop 1 is my router. My modem is showing up (on my side) as 192.168.100.1 when I look at the config. Not sure what other info might be useful.

Ameth

join:2011-07-20
the 10 is your modem. While your 192.168.100.x allows you to read the modem's software, its WAN IP is the 10.


odog
Cable Centric Vendor Biased
Premium,VIP
join:2001-08-05
Atlanta, GA
kudos:17
Reviews:
·Comcast
said by Ameth:

the 10 is your modem. While your 192.168.100.x allows you to read the modem's software, its WAN IP is the 10.

Like Ameth said, check 192.168.100.1 and look at your signal. It might be just a simple signal issue.

The 10.7.192.1 IP is the inside of the CMTS.

Do these pings in separate windows, it can help isolate where the PL is happening.

ping 192.168.100.1 -t
ping 10.7.192.1 -t
ping 68.12.14.2 -t

Medar

join:2002-02-28
Edmond, OK
reply to Medar
Click for full size
OK running three windows and pinging...and seeing the following in the CMD windows:

192.168.100.1 - no issue
10.7.192.1 - timeouts occur / packet loss occurs
68.12.14.2 - timeouts occur / packet loss occurs

Ameth, odog - appreciate the help. I have a service guy coming out tomorrow and am tracing/recording all this to show him.

I also attached a cap of my Ping Plotter trace. So odog based off your comments this is out of my control since this is in the CMTS and out of my control?

Fun text from trace:

Reply from 10.7.192.1: bytes=32 time=9ms TTL=254
Reply from 10.7.192.1: bytes=32 time=8ms TTL=254
Reply from 10.7.192.1: bytes=32 time=7ms TTL=254
Reply from 10.7.192.1: bytes=32 time=7ms TTL=254
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 10.7.192.1: bytes=32 time=8ms TTL=254


Anonguy

@68.106.20.x
What are your signal levels like?

You can view them at »192.168.100.1

Medar

join:2002-02-28
Edmond, OK
reply to Medar
Click for full size
Anonguy that is the part I don't know or understand...signal levels. Here is a screen cap of my signal levels.

AmericanLoco

join:2014-02-08
United State
reply to Medar
Your upstream power levels are very high, and your downstream power is pretty low. If you have any splitters inbetween your cable and the modem, you need to try and eliminate it.

Medar

join:2002-02-28
Edmond, OK
reply to Medar
I unfortunately do not. There is a 4-way splitter in the house at the Demarc...three go to TVs, one goes to this cable modem. It was set up that way by the cable company. I can have them check the modem levels when they are here tonight since I have no control over that.


AnonPhx

@24.251.82.x
If you just have a 4 way splitter at dmarc and no other splits in the house that you are aware of then something isn't right. A 4 way splitter will increase upstream levels by 7db, if you're modem is at 54, then roughly at tap you would expect 46-47db, which is well beyond standards. This is of course assuming everything is in working order.

The high upstream readings can be a sign of cable damage, as the modem is trying to increase its power to overcome some flaw.

AmericanLoco

join:2014-02-08
United State
reply to Medar
That's also assuming it's a good high quality splitter - which it's probably not. I'd get a two-way splitter, and put the modem on one end, and the 4 way splitter off the other.

Ameth

join:2011-07-20
reply to Medar
said by Medar:

OK running three windows and pinging...and seeing the following in the CMD windows:

192.168.100.1 - no issue
10.7.192.1 - timeouts occur / packet loss occurs
68.12.14.2 - timeouts occur / packet loss occurs

So you are okay to the router but not okay to the modem, seems like something inside. I agree that 54 is not good. The service guy should be able to clean that up.

Medar

join:2002-02-28
Edmond, OK
reply to Medar
Service guy confirmed I was running a bit hot and one of my two lines in was much hotter...ie they are not synced and all sorts of stuff is going wrong. He added a filter at the demarc into the house.

He did confirm there is an issue at the pedestal (which is the primary cause of what I am seeing) - they are supposed to fix that within 48 hours.

Medar

join:2002-02-28
Edmond, OK
reply to Medar
Well I appreciate everyone's responses on this.

6 phone calls later
3 service visits to the house later
1 Lineman coming out to fix the outside

...and things are back to normal. The issue (as I always told them) was never inside the house...it was at the main termination block or the pedestal outside the house (and additional issues further into Cox's network).

Frustrating, but fixed.