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Ole Juul

join:2013-04-27
Coalmont, BC

6to4 or 6in4 - which do you use?

I've just enabled IPv6 in my router. I couldn't get tunnelling to work so I ended up just using 6to4. For my own practical purposes, that seems just fine.

What do people here use?



graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:1

Native IPv6 via DHCP-PD.



janderso1
Jim
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-15
Saint Petersburg, FL
reply to Ole Juul

What router do you have? For a Hurricane Electric tunnel you need a router that supports 6rd or 6in4 tunnels. The Linksys E series (E900, E1200…) support 6rd tunnels.
--
Jim Anderson


Ole Juul

join:2013-04-27
Coalmont, BC
Reviews:
·Callcentric

1 recommendation

I'm running Tomato Shibby 105 AIO on a WNR3500Lv2. It supports a number of IPv6 arrangements. I got a tunnel from HE, but the router wouldn't save settings for "6in4 static tunnel". So I chose "6to4 Anycast Relay". At this point it serves my purposes and I'm happy with that. I'm more just curious about what other people are doing and why.

One of the reasons I'm interested is that after looking around, I find that it is almost universally unsupported and it is not just my ISP. I set up a server in another country with only IPv6 access so I could experiment and explore a little before I get left behind. However, at this point it is looking like old folks like me will be long dead before it will become an issue.

Edit: Yes my router also supports 6rd, but I haven't figured out what that means. (there seems to be a lot of reading involved in this)



rchandra
Stargate Universe fan
Premium
join:2000-11-09
14225-2105

1 recommendation

reply to Ole Juul

"Enabling IPv6 in your router" could mean anything/a lot of things. It doesn't necessarily mean things won't work, it just means what you tried so far for 6in4 doesn't work.

6to4 to me is a kludge. To where does 192.88.99.1 go (or come from)? You have no idea, and it may change...from time to time or minute to minute. It all depends on the whim of whoever decides to take that traffic or makes the right routing advertisements to where you're connected, or where your ISP decides it should go. If it works, or even works seemingly well for you now, I wouldn't count on it to work well all the time.

6to4 is tunnelling, so you DID get tunnelling to work.

I use a low-end PC with Linux on it for a router, although there are many Linux-based appliances which would do just fine. I have a tunnel with Hurricane Electric, and I'm very, very pleased with it. The advantage is that you get to choose the tunnel broker server, you have a specific IP address as your peer, and if you want to change, no sweat, you can just create another tunnel (up to 5 I think). Yes, it means you have to renumber your network, but the same would be true if you were able to get a PD directly from your ISP, and they decide to change prefixes on you, just like they change DHCP leases.

I also have the option of native PD with TWC, but there are a number of issues which make this less attractive, primary of them is TWC doesn't seem to know what the hell they're doing w/r/t DNS for the ip6.arpa zone, because the address range they're delegated is answered with an error as soon as the query hits their nameservers. With HE, they specifically allow you to delegate the zone corresponding to the address space they allocate to your tunnel to whatever nameservers you want...and here's the kicker: They also have free DNS hosting for up to 50 zones, with easy provisions for reverse zones.

So if you've exhausted all the options with your current router's settings, assuming you have one of the nearly ubiquitous appliances, you may wish to see if any of the open source alternatives might be compatible with your router and to your liking, and flash that firmware to your router. I hear tell many of them have great 6in4 support and work quite well with HE, although I've never tried them personally.
--
English is a difficult enough language to interpret correctly when its rules are followed, let alone when a writer chooses not to follow those rules.

Jeopardy! replies and randomcaps REALLY suck!


Ole Juul

join:2013-04-27
Coalmont, BC
Reviews:
·Callcentric

1 recommendation

said by rchandra:

"Enabling IPv6 in your router" could mean anything/a lot of things. It doesn't necessarily mean things won't work, it just means what you tried so far for 6in4 doesn't work.

Yes, it's just 6in4 which doesn't work with the ways I've tried it. I could easily be making a simple/stupid mistake somewhere. I'm very green at IPv6. As it is "enabled" at the moment I can use "ping6" and ssh into my IPv6 server just fine. Also access IPv6 only web sites. So, my fundamental issue of being able to access IPv6 sites is at least temporarily solved. (BTW: my ISP gives me a fixed v4 IP)

said by rchandra:

6to4 is tunnelling, so you DID get tunnelling to work.

OK, so there's a misconception on my part right there.

I was interested in the Hurricane Electric solution and using 6in4 mostly because it seemed like the more correct way to go and was recommended by »test-ipv6.com/ . Perhaps I should go back and try the 6in4 again and get some help if I still can't get it to work.


leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET

1 recommendation

6to4 tunnels are not very reliable and therefore you are correct to try for a 6in4 tunnel with Hurricane Electric instead.
However if your ISP offers 6rd (which is a much improved version of 6to4 and doesn't have the reliability issues) then that might be an even better IPv6 option for you.

In order of preference, the best ways to get IPv6 connectivity are:
1.) dual-stack native IPv4/IPv6 from your ISP
2.) IPv6 tunnel from your ISP (both 6rd and 6in4 are fine)
3.) 6in4 IPv6 tunnel from 3rd party provider such as Hurricane Electric
4.) as a last resort try 6to4 or teredo
--
Got some spare cpu cycles ? Join Team Helix or Team Starfire!


mikev
Premium
join:2002-05-04
Leesburg, VA

1 recommendation

reply to Ole Juul

Using 6in4 static tunnel from Hurricane Electric, since FiOS doesn't yet support IPv6. I'm using Tomato Shibby 119 AIO on an Asus RT-N66U. Been up and running for over a year with no problems.



NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

1 recommendation

reply to Ole Juul

I had been using Hurricane Electric 6in4. I returned a Netgear WNDR3500 within hours of purchase because the stock firmware did not support either 6in4 or 6rd.

I now have an ASUS RT-AC66U, which supports both 6in4 and 6rd. Last January, my ISP turned up 6rd, and I've been using them ever since.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


Ole Juul

join:2013-04-27
Coalmont, BC
Reviews:
·Callcentric

1 recommendation

said by NormanS:

I returned a Netgear WNDR3500 within hours of purchase because the stock firmware did not support either 6in4 or 6rd.

Good move. I didn't even look at the stock firmware except what I saw of it when installing Shibby. The current installation does support 6to4 nicely, but your post gives me a heads up that there could be some problem.

said by mikev:

Using 6in4 static tunnel from Hurricane Electric, since FiOS doesn't yet support IPv6. I'm using Tomato Shibby 119 AIO on an Asus RT-N66U. Been up and running for over a year with no problems.

Well that's at least a hint the Shibby 119 will actually do it, perhaps I should upgrade. My current version works well though, and I have an unfounded dislike of rebooting anything.

I didn't get any answers on the Tomato forum, but perhaps IPv6 isn't that popular there. I also sent an e-mail to my ISP asking if they could offer v6 addresses or a tunnel. They didn't get back to me. I'm sure they know what I'm talking about but were probably stunned by me asking the question since in this area no one would ask that in a million years. lol


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

said by Ole Juul:

I didn't even look at the stock firmware except what I saw of it when installing Shibby. The current installation does support 6to4 ...

The WNDR3500 stock firmware does support 6to4; just not 6in4 or 6rd.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum

Ole Juul

join:2013-04-27
Coalmont, BC
Reviews:
·Callcentric

I probably wouldn't have used it anyway because I need realtime readout of throughput per IP connected as well as the ability to put my hosts file there. Anyway, Shibby has 7 choices including 6in4 and 6rd. I just can't get it to work. So either I'm missing something (other than a brick) or this particular hardware and firmware combination is missing something. I've followed several howtos and think I've got it figured out. Still no luck.


mikev
Premium
join:2002-05-04
Leesburg, VA
Reviews:
·Callcentric

said by Ole Juul:

...I need realtime readout of throughput per IP connected...

Just a note that Tomato's IP throughput graphs are only IPv4 and don't show anything IPv6-related on them. Don't know if that's a limitation of the system used or what, but I've never seen an IPv6 address displayed on the graphs.

quesix

join:2005-12-19
Cary, IL

1 recommendation

reply to Ole Juul

Used to use HE.NET tunnel with Microsoft (XPsp2 Box as DMZ host) endpoint behind Cisco Router (2621XM) then Firewall (Cisco ASA5505).

Then moved to private 6in4 using office Native static IPv6 addresses terminated in the Cisco 2621XM at home.

Today Using Cisco 2851 with native now (DHCPv6 + DHCP-PD). Took some tweaking to stop dropping of connection on DHCP-PD renew (Firewall blocking), and then /64 later /60 changing on me (missing expire on SLAAC by default), that would not have been possible on Stock firmware from linksys/netgear/etc....but it's been running smooth for last 6 months.

I've had success with Linksys E1200's with PPPoE+DHCP-PD on DSL (modem in bridge mode).

I prefer native addressing (Native Static/DHCP-PD, 6in4 static like HE.NET, or 6rd) with local ISP Teredo (2001:0::/32) and 6to4 ANYCAST (2002::/16 using 192.88.99.1) relay for maximum connectivity. Too bad Comcast doesn't have a Teredo Relay, made my own at office.



NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

1 recommendation

reply to Ole Juul

6to4 uses an IPv4 "Anycast" relay at 192.88.99.1. This is automatically routed to the nearest (in terms of BGP "nearness") IPv6 relay to you. This IP address is preconfigured in my ASUS RT AC66U.

Both 6in4 and 6rd use a specific IPv4 IP address for the specific tunnel provider. You also need to know your assigned IPv6 prefix.

In setting up my tunnels, I have to enter:

• IPv6 prefix
• IPv6 prefix length
• Tunnel provider's IPv4 Border Router IPv4 address.

There is also a "Tunnel MTU" to consider; though my router appears to handle that automatically when I leave that field blank.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum