dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
1189
share rss forum feed


jlivingood
Premium,VIP
join:2007-10-28
Philadelphia, PA
kudos:3

4 recommendations

[Connectivity] IPv6 Milestone Reached



graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2

1 recommendation

"duel stack"

Would that be pistols at twenty paces?

AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL
... there can only be one...


graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2
......And I am immortal.

Bink
Villains... knock off all that evil

join:2006-05-14
Castle Rock, CO
kudos:4
Reviews:
·VOIPO

1 recommendation

reply to jlivingood
Way to go Comcast—you clearly take the lead here. While you might be one of the most hated companies in America, your technical prowess with IPv6 is outstanding. That said, the article is quite confusing:
quote:
…100 percent of Comcast’s broadband network has been fully deployed to support IPv6 duel stack…

…deployment continues to expand with penetration expected to reach nearly 50 percent by the end of 2014.

So I guess it’s really almost 50 percent by the end of the year, not 100 percent. Still commendable though.


camper
Premium
join:2010-03-21
Bethel, CT
kudos:1

1 recommendation

 
Possibly it means that 100% of the network supports IPv6, but only 50 percent of the customers are using IPv6 dual stack?

{shrug}

In any case, kudos to Comcast's Engineering team for reaching the milestone.


Chris 313
Come get some
Premium
join:2004-07-18
Houma, LA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
·Vonage
·Comcast
·Comcast Digital ..

1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to jlivingood
Support is good, I'll also be cheering when 100% of Comcast customers will be using IPv6.

biomesh
Premium
join:2006-07-08
Tomball, TX

1 recommendation

reply to camper
I am guessing it means that the backend infrastructure is 100% complete and 30% of the modems / CPE support IPv6.


catchingup

@72.39.85.x
There shouldn't be any guessing. The page was pretty clear what it says.


train_wreck

join:2013-10-04
Antioch, TN

1 recommendation

reply to jlivingood
cool stuff. now just waiting for static BCI IPv6 addresses


EG
The wings of love
Premium
join:2006-11-18
Union, NJ
kudos:10
reply to jlivingood
Congrats to the team on the milestone !!


whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to jlivingood
That's a huge milestone for the Internet. Great job Comcast's engineering group.

I have a few questions that maybe one of the Comcast folks could answer.

1) I don't know much about the ISOC stats but I assume they are collected in a similar fashion to Geoff Huston's APNIC stats (»labs.apnic.net/ipv6-measurement/). That is, by adding elements in web pages (eg. ads) and detecting the requests by ASN(s).

As the xfinitywifi and BCI rollouts are not completed, do the stats ISOC is reporting differ much from what you are measuring internally?

2) Xfinitywifi, any idea when we might see IPv6 there? I recall you mentioning the software (captive portal/IPAM?) was IPv6 not ready.

3) Several years ago that there were limited DS-Lite trials with custom openwrt firmware. I don't use DHCPv6 for the 505 tier so I can't participate, but will we see a public DS-Lite trial by 2016?

RightHere2
Premium
join:2003-02-02
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to Chris 313
said by Chris 313:

Support is good, I'll also be cheering when 100% of Comcast customers will be using IPv6.

That will not happen anytime soon.

One reason:
»[IPv6] Netgear retail router IPv6 issues..

Netgear surely isn't alone here. It'll take a long time for the consumer infrastructure to get fixed & deployed.


YukonHawk

join:2001-01-07
Patterson, NY

1 recommendation

reply to jlivingood
Nice work guys! Keep it moving forward!


Chris 313
Come get some
Premium
join:2004-07-18
Houma, LA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
·Vonage
·Comcast
·Comcast Digital ..

1 recommendation

reply to RightHere2
said by RightHere2:

said by Chris 313:

Support is good, I'll also be cheering when 100% of Comcast customers will be using IPv6.

That will not happen anytime soon.

One reason:
»[IPv6] Netgear retail router IPv6 issues..

Netgear surely isn't alone here. It'll take a long time for the consumer infrastructure to get fixed & deployed.

No kidding, but I do suppose that getting 100% network support going and getting all users on a DS config where you have access to both, and then getting whatever equipment, services and users onto a IPv6 only config that you can, is a major step in the right direction.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

1 recommendation

reply to jlivingood
An article about this on the MCN site now:

Comcast: Our Broadband Network Is IPv6-Ready
Says 100% Of Network Supports IPv6 Dual Stack Connectivity

By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - July 23, 2014
»www.multichannel.com/news/techno···y/382684

madbavarian

join:2013-03-05
Fremont, CA

1 recommendation

reply to jlivingood
A big thank-you for putting in the effort to make this happen! I've been using IPv6 between two Comcast accounts to connect to machines on one lan from the other for the last year. It works great. Sure I could have set up a vpn, but this is the general purpose solution. This way I can connect up from any IPv6 network and check up on things.

The only problem is one small nit. I can't seem to get a /60 PD at the second location. I only get a /64 so I have to bridge the lan, 2ghz wifi and 5ghz wifi. It would be nice to route so that external connections to laptops could use the routing tables to select the ethernet when available. (I add a 1-hop penalty for both wifi-2 and wifi-5.)


Selenia
Gentoo Convert
Premium
join:2006-09-22
Fort Smith, AR
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to Chris 313
said by Chris 313:

Support is good, I'll also be cheering when 100% of Comcast customers will be using IPv6.

That's lots of old ladies whose grandson bought them a router that you will have to be tearing from their cold dead hands lol. The progress is commendable but IPv6 support in these consumer level devices has not been so commendable. Been a bit since I looked at them but even at the end of last year the shelves were stocked with product with no IPv6 support My router is ready. Just waiting for TWC to flip the switch then I will flip the switch off on my network Teredo tunnel(yes I am using dual stack in my network despite TWC) and on for the native support. I check here and there by wiring a PC to the modem to see if it pulls an address but no joy yet.


whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

said by Selenia:

The progress is commendable but IPv6 support in these consumer level devices has not been so commendable. Been a bit since I looked at them but even at the end of last year the shelves were stocked with product with no IPv6 support

Almost every router I have seen released in the last 6 months supports DHCPv6. Of course retailers often sell older hardware so you might not see that reflected in the store shelves.

Almost all of the newer 802.11ac routers support IPv6. I'm hoping we see a lot of consumers deciding to upgrade their wireless.

In any case, eventually this older hardware will die or the user will want connectivity without going through a CGN.

What would be interesting is if larger ISPs like Comcast sent notifications to customers who don't have a DHCPv6 lease when they deployed CGN in a couple of years. I think a lot of people just don't know they need to upgrade their routers.

RightHere2
Premium
join:2003-02-02
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

said by whfsdude:

Almost every router I have seen released in the last 6 months supports DHCPv6. Of course retailers often sell older hardware so you might not see that reflected in the store shelves.

So how many millions of routers do you think were sold before that?

This is a piece of infrastructure that most people never bother to update at home (partly because it's so complicated to set up).

What direct benefits to end users are there by upgrading their router?


train_wreck

join:2013-10-04
Antioch, TN
Reviews:
·Comcast

3 recommendations

said by RightHere2:

What direct benefits to end users are there by upgrading their router?

yeah, that's a tough one. as far as most end users are concerned, they will notice no qualitative difference in their internet experience, and of the few users that have (maybe without their knowledge) already "experimented" with having an IPv6-"capable" router, some have seen problems due to bad firmware implementations (see the Netgear thread, et al).

that said, it's important for the net's future, and congrats on Comcast for rolling this out.


camper
Premium
join:2010-03-21
Bethel, CT
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit

1 recommendation

said by train_wreck:

it's important for the net's future, and congrats on Comcast for rolling this out.

 
Yup.

Getting widespread IPv6 adoption to extend beyond the early adopters and the technically curious customers is going to require a "must have" application that is IPv6-only, or somehow provides a much better experience for those who are IPv6 enabled.

Until then, IPv6 will be more of a "why should I bother" type of experience for most.

It reminds me of the time I introduced email into a company I worked for. Until then, all communication, meeting notices, etc, was done via paper-based memos that were typed up, copied and placed in your mail inbox.

I couldn't get anyone outside of a few early adopters and a couple managers to start using email (~why should I bother, no one else is using email~). The big breakthrough occurred when a VP sent out invites to a meeting only via email. He then went on to chastise the no-shows who said that they don't check email. From that meeting onwards, email usage grew quickly until everyone was using it.

In this instance, the critical application was the VP letting everyone know that email was the new communication vehicle in the company.

Unfortunately, currently in the Internet world it would be suicidal for a company to say that people can access their site only via IPv6.

So then, what is going to be that all-important usage that is IPv6 only. so important that people will go through the IPv6 transition (e.g., buy new router?) in order gain access to it?


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

1 recommendation

reply to telcodad
Karl finally has a news item up about this achievement now: »Comcast Reaches 100% Residential IPv6 Deployment