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martinh

join:2010-03-24

[NV] Theoretically, is there anything you can do about bad routing?

For example to LA servers, cox hands it off to PEER1 and I get routed to dallas first and all over the place which increases my ping. Theoretically, is there anything I can do? Will moving to another part of vegas have any effect or is everybody in the city being routed in the same manner?


CoxVegas

join:2011-07-25
Las Vegas, NV
kudos:10
Everyone in a metro area will /usually/ get routed in the same manner, barring fiber cuts or outages. There may be exceptions here or there, though, and it's not a hard and fast rule.

Generally speaking, if it's after we hand off to PEER1, we do it at the location PEER1 requests or is otherwise shortest network wise.

PM me the IP you're trying to get to and I can have our routing guys take a look but in a huge percentage of cases, the route that's chosen is best (or at least no better than alternate routes).


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
reply to martinh
Probably not. Much depends on peering agreement between ISPs and transit providers. Although Level 3 peers in three, or four west coast cities, SBC Global only met with Level 3 in San José, California. SBC Global customers in San Diego trying to connect with servers in Florida, were routed on the SBC network up the coast to San José, transferred to Level 3 transit, then back down the west coast, again, to Los Angeles, California before heading east through Dallas, Texas and Atlanta, Georgia. A cousin's father-in-law lives just 20 miles from my old, west San José residence. Charter took his traffic 90 miles south to San Louis Obispo, California before putting it on AT&T transit only to come back to San José to hand off to Level 3.

And things still can change. After SBC bought AT&T, they began moving routing from the Level 3 backbone to the AT&T backbone.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum

martinh

join:2010-03-24
Damn wish we had a different ISP here, other places get a bunch of isps to choose from


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
I think it is less about your choices of ISP and more about your proximity to major data peering points. Folks on Charter Cable in southern Oregon get routed to Portland first, before getting on a major backbone. Comcast subs in northeast California get routed down to San José. So, despite what looks like a reasonably simple 200 mile separation between Gants Pass and Eureka, the actual path between them shoots 200 miles south to San José, 600 miles north to Portland, than 250 miles south to Grants Pass; a loopy 1,150 mile path between two points only separated by 200 miles of terrain.

Good choices to live:

• Seattle, Washington
• Portland, Oregon
• San Francisco, California
• Los Angeles, California
• Denver, Colorado
• Dallas-Ft. Worth, Texas
• St. Louis, Missouri (probably)
• Chicago, Illinois
• New York, New York.
• Baltimore, Maryland/Washington, D.C.
• Atlanta, Georgia

And a few others I don't know about. Everywhere else connects to, and between these cities. If you live at the perimeter of one region, and try to connect with the perimeter of another, you first go in to the center, then between the centers, then out to the other perimeter.

Remember the real estate adage: "Location, location, location". Living away from urban centers is nice, if you can do it; but don't expect urban amenities in the exurbs (almost rural edges of urban centers).
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


CoxVegas

join:2011-07-25
Las Vegas, NV
kudos:10
reply to martinh
said by martinh:

For example to LA servers, cox hands it off to PEER1 and I get routed to dallas first and all over the place which increases my ping. Theoretically, is there anything I can do? Will moving to another part of vegas have any effect or is everybody in the city being routed in the same manner?

I took a look at the IP you sent me, and unfortunately the route it is on is the best one being advertised to us. You're still in the low 50s of ping time between your home and there. Having to go through Dallas to get to LA is about 15ms of that. All of Vegas would be routed the same way.

I'll go ahead and ping some of our peering folks just to take a second look but if it does get improved it won't be in the really short term.


Hard Harry

join:2010-10-19
Narragansett, RI
kudos:2
reply to martinh
Is it just latency your concerned of or throughput. Could a VPN force the traffic around what ever Cox bottleneck your experiencing? Not sure if the VPN itself would add more latency then it would save, but just a thought.

martinh

join:2010-03-24
Latency is not too high at all (50's ms as cox vegas stated) however it feels much laggier than that, I don't know why.

martinh

join:2010-03-24
actually I think I fixed the problem causing everything to feel laggier than it should be. It was the ethernet cable, mixing cat5e and 6 seemed to lag stuff

whiteazn

join:2005-02-10
Henderson, NV
reply to martinh
said by martinh:

Damn wish we had a different ISP here, other places get a bunch of isps to choose from

wat? most places in the US have 1-2 choice for broadband (usually 1), 1 choice for DSL, and satellite. I don't consider that a bunch of ISPs to choose from