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Adstein

join:2014-08-01
Dalton, MA

Mile long driveway, best fiber approach

Hi,
We are putting in a mile long driveway and burying utilities at the same time. We have TWC at the street so I am thinking of using a media converter at the street and laying fiber to the building site.
I am looking for guidance as to the best solution to get high speed internet to the house site.
Thanks.



F100

join:2013-01-15
Durham, NC

You could try an Ethernet media converter like the TP Link MC210CS that is good over 9 miles on Single mode fiber.

If you have an enclosure with power at the street, you could put the modem and plug in the WAN port to the converter and send it to your house on fiber. Have the same converter on the other end at your house and convert it back to Ethernet for your router.

Would only work with internet. There might be something similar for cable but it would probably be more than $70 per converter. TP Link also has a multi-mode converter but it tops out at 550 meters (.34 miles) so you would need single mode. Single mode fiber is more expensive than multi-mode but these converters are similarly priced.

»www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a···-Product

»www.tp-link.us/products/details/···=MC210CS

TP link is a Chinese company making cheap networking gear. I have a managed switch and it has been pretty good for the price.


Adstein

join:2014-08-01
Dalton, MA

Thanks for the suggestions. Any recommendations on direct burial fiber vs conduit and regular fiber?



F100

join:2013-01-15
Durham, NC

I'll have to defer to others as I don't have experience running fiber like that. At nearly 1600 meters of fiber, it would probably depend on cost of the fiber vs fiber + conduit. Direct burial that is flooded with out armor would probably be cheaper then armored. That's also a lot of PVC conduit so that may add up pretty quickly.

Others have suggested on DSLR that if you run conduit, you want breakout junction boxes every so often, say every 100ft, so you can get at the run if you have problems or need to make changes later.

I've not used these converters but have them in mind a project like this.

Maybe some of the guys that run WISP setup can chime in.


AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL
reply to Adstein

You might want to also check the Home Improvement forum here, similar questions come up frequently and I believe that forum gets more exposure.


Adstein

join:2014-08-01
Dalton, MA
reply to F100

Thanks but at every 100' I would have over 50 breakout boxes. Is that normal? Seems like it would add huge expense.
Any recommendations for direct burial fiber?



ilikeme
I live in a van down by the river.
Premium
join:2002-08-27
Sugar Land, TX
kudos:1

100' would probably be a little excessive. More like every 500-1000 would be more reasonable.



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to Adstein

The number of pull-boxes or hand wells would depend on the layout of the duct...

Straight and basically level? 2-3 evenly spaced would be fine. Twisty and up and down? More; possibly way more.

Every 3-500 feel isn't unreasonable.

I'd suggest duct - 1.5" or bigger, strung with rope. Then you can pull in whatever you need later; fibre, co-ax, etc...


Adstein

join:2014-08-01
Dalton, MA

It will have curves and rises 700 feet so sounds like I need the break out boxes. Should I just buy pre-terminated lengths of say 300' each? What goes in a pull box anyway?


Smokeshow
Premium
join:2009-02-26
Cold Lake, AB
reply to Adstein

I'd go direct buried singlemode cable. Something like corning 012EUC-T4101D20 which I can get for less than $.50/ft right now. Likely to be one of your cheapest options, and is extremely resilient in direct bury applications.


Adstein

join:2014-08-01
Dalton, MA

Thanks. Would you do 1 5,000' length or still break it up with access boxes? If the latter, can this cable be bought pre-terminated?


Smokeshow
Premium
join:2009-02-26
Cold Lake, AB

I would go with one full length. It can be bought pre-terminated. Corning will sell you whatever it is you require.



tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting
reply to Adstein

I would contact TWC, they may not be willing to run fiber to a residence, in that case you are looking at hardline coax if you want both Internet and TV.

If you use your own media converter at the street will need to provide power. Also note as F100 See Profile posted that will only work for Internet, not Cable TV.

Are you interested in POTS telephone, if so call the Telco they will probably drop off some direct burial cable for free. The did for us, but that was many years ago.

I'd strongly recommend using conduit, perhaps even more then one so if you need to replace it or pull more cable you don't need to retrench. PVC conduit is cheap compared to backhoe work. Even if you decide to use direct burial fiber it is still a good idea to install empty conduit. Never know what will happen in the future.

Our house is 600 feet off the road. The first 400 feet are aerial the last 200 underground. When we built it 30ish years ago dropped a flexible 1" polyethylene pipe in the trench just in case. Just this year decided to install a LED yard light and that conduit came in very handy.

/tom


Adstein

join:2014-08-01
Dalton, MA

Thanks Tom.



Edrick
I aspire to tell the story of a lifetime
Premium
join:2004-09-11
Woburn, MA

I sent you a PM about this did you get it?


Adstein

join:2014-08-01
Dalton, MA

Just responded. Had not seen your PM.



plk
Premium
join:2002-04-20
united state
reply to Adstein

You can throw in a few HD homeruns at the road along with the modem, media converter, and a small switch. Personally I would run a smart UPS at that location to keep it powered in a blackout.
Are you going to have the power meter a mile away from the house? I assume not!
In this case you would need a meter at the road to power your equipment. I would look into solar to power your equipment. Because a meter would probably run 20 bucks a month plus the install could be 500 to 1000 bucks unless you can do that too.



voipguy

join:2006-05-31
Forest Hills, NY
reply to Adstein

This "RF2F" product may help:
»www.4cable.tv/

A bit pricey for you to purchase, but the cable operator may be willing to try it, especially if you put the fiber in. (CHECK BEFORE DOING IT!)

It basically puts the fiber headend equipment out on the cable plant, and feeds your home as an RFOG (RF over Glass) home. Your home gets an RFOG node, which converts the light back to RF (and RF to light for the return path). Way less money than extending coaxial plant for a mile.


Adstein

join:2014-08-01
Dalton, MA

Great ideas guys. Thanks. We close next week and then I will be in a position to move forward. I'll report back what I find.



tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting

said by Adstein:

I'll report back what I find.

Be interesting to see what you find out.

Good luck on the purchase.

/tom