dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
810
share rss forum feed


Grolff

@99.157.105.x

[Connection] Should I run new coax?

I am thinking of switching to Comcast. I live in a 3000 sq ft. home built in 1990. I think the coax is that old as well. Is it worth rewiring all my coax? I want a clean signal inside the home. I have 5 TVs to wire and figured I would terminate them where my cat 6 wires terminate and put the modem and cable from the outside in there. I know nothing about coax cable or splitters or anything like that. Any pointers would be appreciated. Perhaps none of it makes a difference though and I should just use the 20 year old cables? Thoughts please. Thank you.


rody_44
Premium
join:2004-02-20
Quakertown, PA

Most 20 year old cable is good and useable. Really comes down to how it was run. If they all run to one area you should be good.



Tobin

join:2003-09-21
Burlingame, CA
kudos:1
reply to Grolff

In all likelihood, they ran standard dual-shield RG6 in a home built around that time. You should have no issues unless they did a shoddy job or rats decided to chew on the cable.


andyross
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-04
Schaumburg, IL
reply to Grolff

Try looking on the side of the cable to see if there is information printed or pressed into it.



Streetlight

join:2005-11-07
Colorado Springs, CO
reply to Grolff

It's not clear from the OP's post whether he has just moved in to that house and/or wants to replace wiring or add new cabling. In any event you can have Comcast check for ingress of external radio frequency power in your current set up and if it's high or out of spec you should consider rewiring. If you've been a Comcast customer for a while the Ingress police should have made a visit and if you're system is bad you would have found out!

As andyross noted you can often find the information about the brand, part number and cable spec printed or pressed into the outside of the cable. If it was printed it may have worn off in spots exposed to the weather so you may have to look for exposed cable inside the house. It's also important to check out the status of the connectors at any junction, particularly outside, to see if there is any corrosion and if the connections are tight. Loose connections exposed to the weather can allow rain water to enter the cable and cause all kinds of problems. Such problem connectors must be replaced. Splitters can also be a problem. If you're adding cabling outlets then you need to get high quality ones. Should you subscribe to both high speed internet as well as TV, the recommended set up is to have the incoming line connected to a two-way splitter with one output going directly to the Internet router and the other output going to a multi-outlet splitter with at least as many outputs as connected TV cable boxes or DTAs. My experience is that you can get a two-way splitter at your local Comcast office without charge but they don't have mulit-outlet ones. When I rewired my house I was able to find on the Web the same brand multi-outlet splitter as the two-way Comcast gave me at their office. If you end up getting a splitter with more outlets than you need the unused outlets should be terminated with 75 Ohm terminators. You must use splitters suitable for cable TV, not satellite TV. I think the frequencies are different. If you're replacing or adding cable you should use the RG6 variety. One site I visited - Blue Jeans Cable (»www.bluejeanscable.com/) has an interesting article that shows data that some triple shielded cable is actually better than quad shield cable. In my case, I ended up using Belden 7915A RG6 cable. I was able to get a kit that included 500 feet of cable, extra high quality compression connectors, wire stripper and a connector tool for ~$150 (»www.broadbandutopia.com/be79500fosow.html). Prices have increased and I have a lot of left over cable!
--
There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.

Sherlock Holmes in
The Boscombe Valley Mystery
A. C. Doyle
Strand Magazine, October 1891



The E
Please allow me to retort
Premium
join:2002-05-26
Burnaby, BC
Reviews:
·Shaw
reply to Grolff

Just go ahead and use the existing cables.

20 year old cable should be RG-6, which is still the standard today. Don't worry about splitters, rewiring, etc.... the Comcast Tech will advise you if anything has to be changed, and should replace any older style/out-of-spec fittings, etc.

As a "Cable Guy" myself, I routinely hook up to 20+ year old cable, with no problems. Wall Plates, Fittings, Splitters and connectors should be swapped out by the Tech, as cable/internet and Phone are using higher and higher frequencies.

Rewiring your home with new cables would be an extremely labor-intensive process, unless you have open / exposed walls. It's typically something that would be done while renovating a home or portion of the home.
--
"All opinions stated by me are solely my views and do not reflect the views of my employer, this site, or even myself depending on my level of sanity at the moment"



Jan Janowski
Premium
join:2000-06-18
Skokie, IL
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to Grolff

Ask the Comcast guy to do a noise test on the cable... If it passes... You're good.

I have one run under a crawl space that is in-accessible. Comcast guy was chasing an intermittent (that ended up being upstream of me), and they were suspecting every cable in the house.... When the noise test turned up nothing (with feed disconnected).. they then pointed up-stream.... and found the problem...

They did a test of this one run, disconnected from all others, and it came up clean... I would have changed the coax if I could, but just simply couldn't get it there to get at it...
--
Looking for 1939 Indian Motocycle



CHIlakefront

@207.237.82.x

said by Jan Janowski:

Ask the Comcast guy to do a noise test on the cable... If it passes... You're good.

Average installation techs especially contractors do not have the capability to the a noise test. If they plug it in and it works they leave it. Otherwise they may change a fitting or 2. Noise tests need specialized equipment that low level installation and service techs do not carry.


Jan Janowski
Premium
join:2000-06-18
Skokie, IL

Then ask for someone who can do the test...
--
Looking for 1939 Indian Motocycle



The E
Please allow me to retort
Premium
join:2002-05-26
Burnaby, BC
Reviews:
·Shaw

Although a fine idea, a noise test simply isn't required for your average installation. Noise issues are generally detected in the plant and tracked down ... It's not an indicator of your line quality, but rather, whether there's something on a line generating noise or allowing ingress.

In the case of the OP, a standard install is all that's required. The Tech (in-house or contractor alike) will determine if things need to be changed/replaced/upgraded.
--
"All opinions stated by me are solely my views and do not reflect the views of my employer, this site, or even myself depending on my level of sanity at the moment"



Streetlight

join:2005-11-07
Colorado Springs, CO

In our area Comcast apparently has folks that run around and check for ingress periodically. Most of the techs here also have sophisticated meters that can measure ingress. These "ingress police" put a notice on my door after filtering out internet several years ago. When I called, a Comcast tech came out and measured ingress upstream and inside the house and said he didn't find anything to worry about, said the folks that did the initial reading were extremely picky and local techs would spend a fair amount of time removing filters because of that. He did suggest I rewire or have Comcast do it for $50 per outlet but it wasn't necessary. I ended up doing it myself for less. And yes, all the cabling is inside the house without wires running all over the place outside and through exterior walls. The old cable was RG 59U stuff. It was a pain to be sure. If the OP finds bad connectors or rusted, splitters and feels he can't do the repair have Comcast come out. If there's a problem and he doesn't do anything, eventually it'll be found. How will he know? He'll be disconnected.
--
There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.

Sherlock Holmes in
The Boscombe Valley Mystery
A. C. Doyle
Strand Magazine, October 1891



Grolff

@99.157.105.x

Thank you. Thank you. Sorry it took me so long to reply, work has been crazy. I will have them test it and go from there then. Thank you for all the good information.



Comp Cmndo

join:2003-08-12
PB Cnty, FL
reply to Grolff

My frame house was built in 1984; all prewire was RG59U. Since all of it was stapled to outside insulated walls with vaulted ceilings, they remain with no issue. Inside walls are uninsulated & I use them for new RG6, where possible. Cable modem & "home run" is dedicated RG6. For a long time, they were on the RG59U with no issue.

Building codes changed after Hurricane Andrew (1992), new frame construction is not allowed.



The E
Please allow me to retort
Premium
join:2002-05-26
Burnaby, BC
Reviews:
·Shaw

The "drop" (or main service line from the ISP to my house) is RG-59 that was direct buried 30-40 years ago. I still have great service, with Phone, 50Mb Internet and an advanced whole home PVR system running flawlessly. I have rewired the inside to RG-6 though.
My point? In many cases RG-59 can still handle what we throw at it.
--
"All opinions stated by me are solely my views and do not reflect the views of my employer, this site, or even myself depending on my level of sanity at the moment"


andyross
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-04
Schaumburg, IL

It's all about distance, the quality of the original cable, and how well it's protected. You may be lucky in having fairly strong signals to begin with. The main issue with RG59 is at the higher frequencies. When it was put down by you, the system probably only 450-550MHz. Now, many areas are 850MHz+.