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TheSMJ

join:2009-08-19
Farmington, MI

Priming fresh drywall - leave the dust?

Last week I had some freshly installed drywall mudded and sanded professionally. Sinec I didn't feel like spending an extra grand on the painting and priming, I decided to do that part myself.

One thing that struck me as odd, is the guy who did the work recommended I leave the dust on the wall, and use a 3/4" nap roller to apply the primer. He said the dust will mix in with the primer as it's rolled on, and leave a better finish which the paint will adhere to. Then, he said I should lightly sand the walls and put on a couple coats of premium paint (I bought SW Superpaint).

This is the first time I'd heard of leaving the dust on the wall, and using such a large nap roller for applying primer. However, I'd done the ceiling this way, and so far it looks pretty good. I'm not sold on the idea of needing to sand the primer since it's already flat and designed for paint to be applied, but if it's really necessary then I guess that's what I'll do.

Has anyone else heard of doing this?
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TheSMJ

join:2009-08-19
Farmington, MI

1 recommendation

Re: Priming fresh drywall - leave the dust?

No need to be a dick. I've read lots of opinions on Google. I'm just wondering about people's experiences here on the forum.

I hope that's alright with you.


Camelot One
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-21
Greenwood, IN
kudos:2
reply to TheSMJ
I've heard of using a thicker nap roller to give a little bit of texture, which is often better than a completely flat finish. As far as the dust, the only thing I've heard is that unless there are just large clumps, you don't HAVE to remove it. I have not heard that leaving it improves anything though.

Use a PVA primer, that is the most important thing.


davidg
Good Bye My Friend
Premium,MVM
join:2002-06-15
none
reply to TheSMJ
I've always used a damp cloth to wipe the dust down. sure some stays on there, but if you leave too much the paint sticks to it and not the wall.
--
Lack of Preparation on YOUR Part does NOT Constitute an Emergency on Mine!


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to TheSMJ
I've never dusted prior to painting and haven't had any problems. I'm not sure if it's any better than not dusting but it's easier and doesn't cause any problems.
--
Written using Dragon NaturallySpeaking


InigoMontoya

join:2014-04-28
kudos:1
reply to TheSMJ
I had about 100 sheets of drywall installed last year. All I did was toss on a thick coat of PVA primer. I'd have laughed if someone said to wipe it all down first. LOL

TheSMJ

join:2009-08-19
Farmington, MI
In that case I guess I don't have to worry about the dust.

What about sanding the primer?

guppy_fish
Premium
join:2003-12-09
Lakeland, FL
kudos:3
reply to TheSMJ
Never removed dust before, this includes new construction, remodel and rehabs over the years.


InigoMontoya

join:2014-04-28
kudos:1
reply to TheSMJ
said by TheSMJ:

In that case I guess I don't have to worry about the dust.

What about sanding the primer?

I didn't find any reason to sand after the PVA but I know some people do a light sanding then do a second coat of PVA. I just did 1 coat of PVA then 2 coats of paint.

TheSMJ

join:2009-08-19
Farmington, MI
I have Sherwin Williams "Latex primer". Is that the same thing as PVA?


InigoMontoya

join:2014-04-28
kudos:1
said by TheSMJ:

I have Sherwin Williams "Latex primer". Is that the same thing as PVA?

Nope PVA is a type like Latex. It should be like half the price too.
»www.sherwin-williams.com/propert···primers/

TheSMJ

join:2009-08-19
Farmington, MI
Hmm. Would the latex stuff I have now work? If I were to return the latex stuff (which I believe I can do), should I redo the ceiling which I already completed?


InigoMontoya

join:2014-04-28
kudos:1
said by TheSMJ:

Hmm. Would the latex stuff I have now work? If I were to return the latex stuff (which I believe I can do), should I redo the ceiling which I already completed?

I'm sure you can use the latex stuff but it's just super expensive compared to PVA. A 5 gallon bucket of PVA was the price of 1 gallon of paint like $35-40. I'd guess that latex primer is far more then $9 a gallon.

The PVA primer is for new drywall only so if you already did the ceiling it should be fine.

TheSMJ

join:2009-08-19
Farmington, MI
Alright great! I still have the receipts so I just might return the unopened cans I have to the store and exchange them for the cheaper option.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to TheSMJ
I would use the PVA for a primer. It will penetrate better than latex. I would prefer some penetration for the primer instead of just being on the surface.


Camelot One
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-21
Greenwood, IN
kudos:2

1 edit
Edit

MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to TheSMJ
US Gypsum recommends removing the dust and using a proper primer first before applying the finish coats. The drywall mud and the drywall itself absorb paint differently.

psiu

join:2004-01-20
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Comcast
·AT&T U-Verse
reply to TheSMJ
Certainly working in lots of construction I never saw those guys removing the dust.

There are also different grades of a drywall/paint finish. I would think that the light sanding after priming is part of getting the smoothest finish you can.

But this is late night speculation on my part


The E
Please allow me to retort
Premium
join:2002-05-26
Burnaby, BC
Reviews:
·Shaw

1 edit
reply to TheSMJ
I'd say everyone is right so far!
In my previous career, I was a paint contractor. What we did was dependent on the desired finish level.

If we were shooting for a high-end, super smooth finish (yes, even on walls), then we'd lightly dust and definitely sand between coats, just to knock off any debris and texture that may have remained.

You don't need to be overly thorough or too concerned, unless you're doing fine- finish work such as trim, casing, cabinetry, etc.

--
"All opinions stated by me are solely my views and do not reflect the views of my employer, this site, or even myself depending on my level of sanity at the moment"


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to psiu
said by psiu:

Certainly working in lots of construction I never saw those guys removing the dust.

There are also different grades of a drywall/paint finish. I would think that the light sanding after priming is part of getting the smoothest finish you can.

There may be some instances when you want a really smooth finish and sand the primer. (never seen anyone do that unless there was something major issue underneath)

Personally I prefer some texture, and I actually use rollers that make a slightly textured finish.
--
.sig


mk_416

@108.168.55.x
reply to TheSMJ
It really depends on the primer you are using and the finish of the paint.

Eggshell and good primer, no need to clean it. Flat/pearl paint or not so great primer and a once over with a soft nylon broom is enough.

TheSMJ

join:2009-08-19
Farmington, MI
reply to aurgathor
I'm going for a flat finish on everything, so there would have to be a whole lot of texture for it to be noticeable. The primer I had applied is dry now, and I can't feel much of anything on it.

I looked into trading my latex primer for PVA primer, and found that since I bought them during SW's 40% off sale, I paid less than $10 more than their PVA stuff.

Even though the store is only a couple miles from my house, it doesn't seem to be worth the hassle getting it replaced.


what the

join:2014-06-28
usa
reply to TheSMJ
I worked in construction and I never seen the sheetrock workers or the painters clean dust off the walls.


what the

join:2014-06-28
usa
reply to TheSMJ
said by TheSMJ:

What about sanding the primer?

Puts you right back where you started, dust flying around and settling on the walls except now it's on your primed walls.

dbamber

join:2003-02-07
Bandon, OR
reply to TheSMJ
My late daddy used to say to me that painting is 90% preparation, and 10% application. I always would use a air hose to blow off the dust, along with a soft textured broom. Daddy also would ask: are you a painter, or paint applicator?


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to what the
said by what the:

I worked in construction and I never seen the sheetrock workers or the painters clean dust off the walls.

Was it their own home they were building?


InigoMontoya

join:2014-04-28
kudos:1
said by cowboyro:

said by what the:

I worked in construction and I never seen the sheetrock workers or the painters clean dust off the walls.

Was it their own home they were building?

They don't do it for themselves either. PVA works perfectly to make a solid foundation for wall coverings. The old saying, "Work smarter not harder", applies here.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
Yes, but even with PVA I remove the dust with a brush or air before priming.


InigoMontoya

join:2014-04-28
kudos:1
said by robbin:

Yes, but even with PVA I remove the dust with a brush or air before priming.

From what I can gather it's pointless unless you need a super smooth wall. The high solid content in PVA just absorbs the dust without any issues and works the same with or without dust on the drywall.