dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
4540
share rss forum feed


Camelot One
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-21
Greenwood, IN
kudos:2

[Electrical] Code question - lighting junction box and drop ceilings

I am putting a drop ceiling in my new theater room, and I will have 2 pendant lights hanging over the bar. Can I put the junction/mounting box up in the stud space, so that just the pendant wire comes through the tiles, or does the box have to be at the tile? I know boxes have to be accessible, but I don't know if removable ceiling tiles still count as accessible.

Lights similar to this: »www.homedepot.com/p/Commercial-E···03764595

My area follows IBC 2008.



nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
·surpasshosting

Code aside, it would look absolutely ridiculous.
Might I suggest an alternative that is 100% code compliant? Here: »www.erico.com/category.asp?category=R1130
--
...or the sheriff will grab ya and the boys will bring you down. The next thing you know, boy - oh you're prison bound...


Spensergig
Past my Prime
Premium,MVM
join:2000-03-26
Bradenton, FL
reply to Camelot One

And-or, you might consider the following »www.lowes.com/pd_150717-1811-CPM···169&Ntt= which is a 3-light multipendant fixture.
You add the actual pendants, sold seperately.

I just installed one, and like it. (Wife is happy )

If it has to be HD, try »www.homedepot.com/p/Eglo-Severo-···02828249


rody_44
Premium
join:2004-02-20
Quakertown, PA
reply to Camelot One

Im pretty sure the answer is yes you can hang them like that.



mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12
reply to Camelot One

If above drop ceiling boxes were not considered accessible then pretty much every commercial/office space would be fscked.

/M



nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
·surpasshosting

2 recommendations

It's not the drop ceiling that is causing the issue. It is the pendant cord running through the drop ceiling.
In order to be code compliant, the fixture must be installed as directed. I'll bet there are no provisions for the cord passing though the ceiling tile.
--
...or the sheriff will grab ya and the boys will bring you down. The next thing you know, boy - oh you're prison bound...



Boneshadow

@68.110.21.x
reply to Camelot One

120v. chords cannot penetrate wall, ceilings, ect. period. Journeyman Electrician speaking.



whizkid3
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-21
Queens, NY
kudos:9
reply to Camelot One

With the exception of IT rooms constructed as per Article 645; cords can not pass through walls, floors, ceilings, etc. This includes hung ceilings, in spite of what poor installations you may have seen.

You can get a special hangar bar that mounts to the ceiling grid and supports the box.



NS4683

join:2000-08-25
South Amboy, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Boneshadow

I would hope a journeyman electrician knows the difference between a chord and a cord.



Camelot One
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-21
Greenwood, IN
kudos:2
reply to Camelot One

I should probably be more specific. I am using the Ceiling Link system, which is a joist mounted plastic track. It isn't strong enough to support any weight other than the tiles themselves.
Link: »www.ceilinglink.com/

I'm using black track, with flat black Armstrong 2x2 tiles. I had planned on using a pendant like this, but in black:
»www.homedepot.com/p/Unbranded-1-···03009430

I have 6" can lights going in the main part of the room, but there is a sewer pipe running through the joist bay over the bar, so those are out. I could put a junction box above the pipe, and let the pendant cord hang down one side of the pipe, and end up with them perfectly centered in a tile. But the pipe runs near the bottom of the bay, so I can't put a box there.

I understand the comments about not running the cord through the tile. But I think having the top fixture mounted off center in a tile would look silly, so I guess I need to shift my tiles a bit, then maybe add some framing to get the box out away from the joist, closer to the center. Unless someone has a better idea. The end goal here is just to throw some light on the bar top, without throwing it toward the screen.

Expand your moderator at work


Boneshadow

@68.110.21.x
reply to Camelot One

Re: [Electrical] Code question - lighting junction box and drop ceilings

Mount an adjustable bar hanger and octagon above the pipe, the box can slide across the hanger to location needed, then add octagon extension rings to extend the box down to the tile.



Camelot One
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-21
Greenwood, IN
kudos:2

That might work, thanks!



Boneshadow

@68.110.21.x
reply to Camelot One

And for what it's worth, having the pendants off-centered in a tile will not be as noticable as you may think. People will notice the pendant, their focus will not be on the ceiling tile layout.



whizkid3
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-21
Queens, NY
kudos:9

I strongly suggest lining up the ceiling tiles, pendants and furniture, if at all possible. This is how its done in commercial buildings by architects, because its symmetrical and looks good.



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8


said by whizkid3:

I strongly suggest lining up the ceiling tiles, pendants and furniture, if at all possible. This is how its done in commercial buildings by architects, because its symmetrical and looks good.

Yes...this.


whizkid3
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-21
Queens, NY
kudos:9
reply to Camelot One

These types of issues are frequent in commercial buildings as well. Ducts, piping and other equipment can be in the way of proper mounting of electrical boxes for suspended fixtures. Many commercial hung ceilings can not accept any weight; or often, the architect or engineer will specify that the boxes and fixtures are to be supported independently of the ceiling. And there can be seismic support requirements as well.

I have some ideas, but will depend on how many inches between the ceiling grid and bottom of joists. If you have some space, you can place a hangar bar across two studs, centered over the fixture position. Then an octagon lighting outlet box can be suspended independently via a threaded rod or 3/8" electrical nipple through the 'center hole' in the box. This type of mount was very common in the 'old days' but is not used often any more. Then the box is suspended independently; and sits so its lip is flush with the ceiling tile. Then the canopy is placed over the box and the fixture suspended as per manufacturer's instructions. See the photo above, and picture a box and ceiling that is not directly mounted to the joists, but a little bit lower. If they have the support mounting to the same center hole via a fixture stud; then you may need some extra parts including a lighting 'hickey' and threaded support loop.

Alternatively, major lighting manufacturers make kits designed to mount pendants where there are all sorts of problems. I found this link on-line to Lightolier kits for mounting suspended fixtures:
»www.lightolier.com/MKACatpdfs/SU···TING.PDF