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floydb1982

join:2004-08-25
Kent, WA
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Clearwire Wireless

Why does my LED LCD do a better job at upconverting DVD

When watching a DVD movie my Philips Blu-ray disc player it will send the DVD 480p resolution to my Insignia LED LCD as 1080p. it's looks udder complete crap doing it that way. So I set the Philips Blu-ray to output the DVD 480p resolution and send it to my Insignia LED LCD in 480p resolution and let the LED LCD up-convert the DVD itself. My Insignia LED LCD does a way better job at up-converting the DVD 480p to 1080p than my Philips Blu-ray player does. Why is my Philips Blu-ray disc player not able to up-covert a DVD as good of a job as my Insignia LED LCD can???


darcilicious
Cyber Librarian
Premium
join:2001-01-02
Forest Grove, OR
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Frontier FiOS
said by floydb1982:

Why is my Philips Blu-ray disc player not able to up-covert a DVD as good of a job as my Insignia LED LCD can???

Based on your observations it would appear that the up-converter included with your TV (what brand/ model exactly??) is better than the up-converter in the Phillips Blu-ray player (which model?)

Without knowing more about your TV and player, there's not much more to say.
--
♬ Dragon of good fortune struggles with the trickster Fox ♬


Dogg
Premium
join:2003-06-11
Belleville, IL
reply to floydb1982
That pretty much sums it up. Prime example why everyone should test various outputs and inputs to see which hardware performs best.
--
Google is your Friend

floydb1982

join:2004-08-25
Kent, WA
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Clearwire Wireless
reply to darcilicious


Dogg
Premium
join:2003-06-11
Belleville, IL
Reviews:
·Charter

1 recommendation

reply to floydb1982
I didn't research your hardware, but it's going to boil down to the hardware (ie: chipsets) used in each device. As with anything else, some are better than others. And it's usually obvious by the Brand name of the device and the price.

You could spend the time researching each chipset and reading the reviews/testing, but it's pretty much meaningless. You have already found out first hand with a little testing which device (ie: chipset) performs best in your situation.
--
Google is your Friend

knarf829

join:2007-06-02
kudos:1
reply to floydb1982
Your $900 TV has better electronics than your $150 Blu-Ray player.

floydb1982

join:2004-08-25
Kent, WA
Were did you come up with those prices??? I paid $700 for the TV from Best Buys and $128 on the Blu-ray player from Walmart.

knarf829

join:2007-06-02
kudos:1

2 edits
said by floydb1982:

Were did you come up with those prices??? I paid $700 for the TV from Best Buys and $128 on the Blu-ray player from Walmart.

Suggested retail prices on the two reviews I read that came up in Google searches. How on earth would I know where you bought them or what you paid for them?

The point is the same regardless of the specific numbers. When you pay 5X as much for one thing as you did another, you generally get higher quality electronics.

Blu-Ray players used to cost 700, 800, 1000 dollars. They didn't get cheaper on their own. Once new technology makes a splash about how great it looks / sounds / works, the manufacturers slowly begin to use cheaper parts therein, bringing the cost down to where Joe Sixpack is comfortable making a purchase but causing them to look / sound / work worse. People are willing to spend more on TVs than players, so they don't need to bend the cost curve down as much.