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Nam Vet4
Premium
join:2001-12-03
Allentown, PA

192.168.1.255

why am i able to ping this?

thanks
--
OFFICIAL BAIL BONDSMAN TO THE NFL



linksys tek

join:2002-06-27
La Puente, CA

Where are you getting this address from?



Nam Vet4
Premium
join:2001-12-03
Allentown, PA

what difference does it make ?
i can ping that ip in my befsr41.
--
OFFICIAL BAIL BONDSMAN TO THE NFL



SYNACK
Just Firewall It
Premium,Mod
join:2001-03-05
Venice, CA

Depending on your netmask, this can be a valid IP and nothing is wrong.

If your netmask is e.g. 255.255.255.0, this is a broadcast IP and should not respond to ping requests.

Many Devices did in the past respond to ping request directed at the broadcast address, but since the introduction of smurf attacks (and friends), this should no longer happen.
--
Where in the world is LA/OC ?



GPorter
It Always Works Better When It's On

join:2001-03-21
San Antonio, TX
reply to Nam Vet4

I believe you're asking "I don't have a computer with that IP, so why can I ping-and get a response from-that address?"

My guess is that it's something like the DHCP server's reserved address, but I could be wrong. Hopefully I at least clarified your question for others.
--
Glenn-Remembering 9-11-01 "Let's Roll!"



g0alie35

@covad.net
reply to Nam Vet4

Isn't that where the router sends its logs to?



Nam Vet4
Premium
join:2001-12-03
Allentown, PA
reply to SYNACK

well that is the subnet mask (as set in the linky)
and i can ping 192.168.1.255.

i put that ip in ie's "trusted sites" but got a page can not be displayed"

ok i understand there is no web server there but still
i can ping it from the lan (just tested 2 lan puters)

what service is at that ip?
--
OFFICIAL BAIL BONDSMAN TO THE NFL


ITT_Techie

join:2002-10-20
Aliso Viejo, CA
reply to Nam Vet4

When the last set of number in an IP address are 255, that indicates to broadcast info to all PCs in that network scope



SYNACK
Just Firewall It
Premium,Mod
join:2001-03-05
Venice, CA

2 recommendations

reply to Nam Vet4

If your subnet mask is 255.255.255.0, then this is the subnet broadcast IP address. This is a special, reserved IP address. All nodes on your subnet must listen to it. ( e.g. Netbios broadcasts are used to find other netbios computers, RIP broadcasts are used to disseminate routing information.)

Broadcast addresses are an important and required feature of any IP network and used whenever yor machine needs to announce something for everybody else to hear.

Years ago, almost every device responded to pings to the broadcast address. e.g. if you pinged a full class C subnet, you got 253 answers. As you can easily see, this puts a heavy load on the network. Most newer computers listen to broadcasts, but don't ever reply to them to avoid smurf attacks.

As g0alie35 hinted, you could setup your router to send the logs to 192.168.1.255. In this case it does not matter what IP your listening logging program is, it will always receive them. You can even log with multiple computers if you want. Note that this is only possible with stateless protocols (e.g. UDP). You cannot complete a TCP threeway handshake with multiple devices.
--
Where in the world is LA/OC ?



Nam Vet4
Premium
join:2001-12-03
Allentown, PA
reply to ITT_Techie

ok but looking a synack's post
that ip should not be pingable!
--
OFFICIAL BAIL BONDSMAN TO THE NFL


ITT_Techie

join:2002-10-20
Aliso Viejo, CA
reply to Nam Vet4

What operating system are we dealing with here?



Nam Vet4
Premium
join:2001-12-03
Allentown, PA
reply to SYNACK

Click for full size
would the top line above (wallwatcher) indicate that
the linky logs are leaving the linky on 192.168.1.255?

if so why do i have to specify a destination ip for the linky log's
--
OFFICIAL BAIL BONDSMAN TO THE NFL


Nam Vet4
Premium
join:2001-12-03
Allentown, PA
reply to ITT_Techie

all 98se



LinkTech
Former Linksys Tech
VIP
join:2002-07-02
Mission Viejo, CA

Go to the router setup page, »192.168.1.1/log.htm and specify the log there



Nam Vet4
Premium
join:2001-12-03
Allentown, PA

i have it set up, iam not having problems getting logs
the question is why is 192.168.1.255 pingable?
--
OFFICIAL BAIL BONDSMAN TO THE NFL


djblack

join:2002-08-19
Troutdale, OR

2 recommendations

reply to Nam Vet4

WHOAH HORSEY!!!

Chill out, it's not the end of the world that the broadcast address of your LAN is pingable. It's not pingable from the outside world, it's not visible to the outside world, so don't worry about it. Contrary to what others have said here, it's not a security risk, for your broadcast address to be pingable...when it's on your LAN. If this broadcast address happened to be public IP space, then you might be concerned.

In any subnet, there's always a broadcast, and a network address. In the Linksys' case, by default they have 24-bit subnets on the LAN interface (255.255.255.0), which leaves you with a network address of 192.168.1.0(not pingable, for identification purpose only), and a broadcast address of 192.168.1.255, which is pingable.

This really isn't a big deal, you can go back to normal sleep habits now.



PA23

join:2001-12-12
East Hanover, NJ
reply to Nam Vet4

Synack and Djblack have hit the nail right on the head, assuming the mask is 255.255.255.0, the 192.168.1.255 is a broadcast and everybody on the subnet listens to it.

its normal, its correct and its expected



Nam Vet4
Premium
join:2001-12-03
Allentown, PA

thank you



bky
moof moof
Premium
join:2002-07-05
San Francisco, CA
reply to Nam Vet4

I have a befsr41v2 as well:

Pinging 192.168.1.255 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time1ms TTL=150
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time1ms TTL=150
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time1ms TTL=150
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time1ms TTL=150

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.255:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

Notice that the router is the device sending the ping replies, not the broadcast address.
--
I think, therefore I am confused.



Vampirefo
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-11
Huntington, WV
kudos:1
reply to Nam Vet4

Everyone is over analyzing this, The address is pingable, simply because this is where the logs are kept, if it weren't pingable then no logs could be kept there.
--
TrojanHunter Stands For Privacy!!!!!!!



PA23

join:2001-12-12
East Hanover, NJ
reply to bky

said by bky:

Notice that the router is the device sending the ping replies, not the broadcast address.

as it should. All devices will respond solely with their own IP address.

again, normal, correct yadda yadda yadda....

This isn't a bug, this isn't a problem.


GPorter
It Always Works Better When It's On

join:2001-03-21
San Antonio, TX
reply to Nam Vet4

Here's what mine says:

C:\Documents and Settings\User>ping 192.168.1.255

Pinging 192.168.1.255 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time1ms TTL=150
Reply from 192.168.1.251: bytes=32 time1ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.1.251: bytes=32 time1ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.1.251: bytes=32 time1ms TTL=64

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.255:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% l
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

I'm curious why the replies come from 192.168.1.251, but as has been said previously, this is all internal and not a problem.

By the way, I tried disabling logs, and the ping still worked.
--
Glenn-Remembering 9-11-01 "Let's Roll!"



robofalcon
On The Line Between Genius And Insanity
Premium
join:2002-09-06
Hayward, CA

I get the same thing on my linksys router. If i ping the broadcast IP my router replys, and that is it. Maybe it is a linksys thing.

Pinging 192.168.1.255 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=4ms TTL=150
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=3ms TTL=150
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=3ms TTL=150
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=3ms TTL=150

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.255:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 3ms, Maximum = 4ms, Average = 3ms
--
"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former." -Albert Einstein


BoostFrenzy

join:2002-02-12
Grand Rapids, MI
reply to Nam Vet4

so what piece of software is good to grab the logs from the broadcast?



robofalcon
On The Line Between Genius And Insanity
Premium
join:2002-09-06
Hayward, CA

said by BoostFrenzy:
so what piece of software is good to grab the logs from the broadcast?
Wallwatcher is free, linklogger is not. Both work. I use Wallwatcher and its fine.
--
"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former." -Albert Einstein


jazzman916
Life on the Upbeat
Premium,MVM,ExMod 2004-10
join:2001-09-01
Birdland
reply to BoostFrenzy

said by BoostFrenzy:
so what piece of software is good to grab the logs from the broadcast?
I use Log Viewer, but here are some more: »/faq/2613


Nam Vet4
Premium
join:2001-12-03
Allentown, PA
reply to PA23

Click for full size
well if rep's ping returns are normal
(coming from 192.168.1.1)
then what about mine?
--
OFFICIAL BAIL BONDSMAN TO THE NFL


robofalcon
On The Line Between Genius And Insanity
Premium
join:2002-09-06
Hayward, CA

weird- what is your subnet mask? A computer cannot have a broadcast IP for its IP address.
[text was edited by author 2002-12-23 21:10:53]



bbarrera
Premium,MVM
join:2000-10-23
Sacramento, CA
kudos:1

reply to Nam Vet4

Don't believe everything Windows tells you...

Hire A Vet... Windows is screwed up. Nothing wrong with your computer.

My returns are not coming from 192.168.1.255, and yet that is exactly what Win2k says (incorrectly):

C:\>ping 192.168.1.255

Pinging 192.168.1.255 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.1.255: bytes=32 time=10ms TTL=60
Reply from 192.168.1.255: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=60
Reply from 192.168.1.255: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=60
Reply from 192.168.1.255: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=60

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.255:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 10ms, Average = 2ms

I fired up a packet sniffer and confirmed that traffic was not coming from .255.

Moral of the story: don't believe everything Windows tells you.

[text was edited by author 2002-12-23 21:21:31]


Nam Vet4
Premium
join:2001-12-03
Allentown, PA
reply to robofalcon

Re: 192.168.1.255

Click for full size
here it is