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kmac1
Off in new directions
Premium
join:2001-06-07
Port Neches, TX

Office Install With Pictures!!!

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I know that most of the folks doing their own installs are residential, whether in a single or multi-unit dwelling. However ther are a some of you that have small businesses that you're puttint DSL into and don't have a residential telco setup. So this series of posts is for you.

This is a typical business setup. There is a Telco DMARC next to the customer's RJ21X connection blocks. These are also called punch-down blocks. The tool used to make the connection is called an impact tool or punch-down tool. It uses a "66" style blade. These can be obtained at most electronics stores and aren't usually that expensive.

As dialtone is fed into the DMARC it is routed over to the PBX block. As dialtone is brought out of the PBX on the other side of the block it is routed over to the IW block where it then goes to the respective jacks. If there is a line that doesn't need to go into the PBX, such as dedicated faxes or modem lines, then these go straight from the DMARC to the IW connection block.
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DSL- It's not just a job, it's an Adventure!!!


kmac1
Off in new directions
Premium
join:2001-06-07
Port Neches, TX

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In the close-up you can see where the pairs are terminated. The silver tabs are called "bridge clips" This type of block is split, meaning on each row pin 1 & 2 are connected as are pins 3 & 4. The bridge clips are used to make the connection across pins 2 & 3. This is done so that there is a test point, as well as a point to isolate the premis wiring.

In this setup I place an external filter box. It's used to house the filter(LPF-200) as well as provide connection posts for the wiring. This really isn't needed if you're doing your own wiring. The filter can be wired up, then hidden behind the blocks. However having a nice clean setup doesn't hurt either.
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DSL- It's not just a job, it's an Adventure!!!


kmac1
Off in new directions
Premium
join:2001-06-07
Port Neches, TX
reply to kmac1

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After installing the filterbox on the backboard, I ran a jumper(violet/blue) from the telco side of the DMARC to the connection posts in the box. From there I continued on to the IW block and left plenty os slack for my connection. Connect the leads from the filter and the n tighten the posts down. Remember, don't tighten too hard or you'll damage the wires and they'll break. Snug is plenty.

Next came finding the pair for my jack. In this setup it was easy because whoever had installed the wiring originally had labeled all the jacks and their corresponding locations on the block. If this hadn't have been done I would have toned out a pair using a tone & amplifier. If all else fails you could run a new IW if needed.

Using the punch-down tool I made my connections, first at the Telco DMARC side and then at the pair I was going to use for My DSL run. I didn't put the bridge clips back into their original spots, instead I just put them over the 1st two pins. This canceled the bridge but kept the clips safe for use later if the DSL line was disconnected.

Next I placed a jumper from the filter back to the customer side of the DMARC. I used a different color wire than my unfiltered DSL to distinguish the difference, but if you only have one color of wire then by all means use it, just keep what's filtered and what's not straight. Again snug is fine on the filter posts. Punch down the wire on the DMARC and the wiring is finished here.
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DSL- It's not just a job, it's an Adventure!!!


kmac1
Off in new directions
Premium
join:2001-06-07
Port Neches, TX
reply to kmac1

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As you can see from the finished DMARC I have "killed" the bridge to accomplish isolating the IW I wanted to use for my DSL. Instead of dialtone coming across the bridge, it's fed from the filter. Like I said before, move the clips over pins 1 & 2. This will keep them safe for later use and not be in bridge mode.

After punching down the DSL wire on the IW block, the only thing left to do is wire up the dedicated jack.

If your situation is one where you have a LAN and it's in the same location you can just run the wire(unfiltered) straight from the filter box over to the jack. Mount it somewhere close to the router(if you have one) or mode. I usually mount the jack on the backboard at a close edge.

Hope this helps and let me know if I can help with any questions you might have or need any advice.
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DSL- It's not just a job, it's an Adventure!!!


MikeIsMe

join:2000-09-22
Fort Worth, TX
reply to kmac1

Wow ADSL....that is some good work there. I know from experience that an installer is worth his/her weight in gold.

I have one who does work for me from time to time and I have no problem paying his asking price. All I have to do is say "Just make it work"....and he does. Wish I could learn how to do it.

Keep posting your pics....I enjoy the configurations you come up with.

Mike



ohmygod

@tnt8.chattanooga.tn.
reply to kmac1

You ARE the MAN!!!

thank you infinately for your post.



proton666
Padawan For Hire

join:2000-12-05
FBI

reply to kmac1

Re: Office Install With Pictures!!!

I just want to know if Telecommuncations backboard is the technical name for plywood? And if so, is it FCC licensed?
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The truth is out there! Join the DSLR SETI@Home club.

[text was edited by author 2001-08-16 16:27:07]



kmac1
Off in new directions
Premium
join:2001-06-07
Port Neches, TX

YES!!! And for a short time only I've got some hard to get, 4x8 Telecom Backboards for sale cheap! Only $199.95 (sorry at this low price shipping is not included) till supplies run out. Don't be left out, get yours today!!!!!
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DSL- It's not just a job, it's an Adventure!!!