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utahluge

join:2004-10-14
Draper, UT

Super Glue - Heat Ok?

I was doing some reading from some searches saying that it is bad to heat superglue before it dries... can it be slightly heated after it dries? I superglued a small fan to a small project I am working on (experimental) but as soon as I powered it up it blew a extremely strong superglue smell out. Is it ok to turn it back on after everything dries or should I scrap the superglue idea?


Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:10

1 edit
Super glue is not good with constant heat. The smell will go away, but that's not the problem. In time, the super glue can be compromised due to heat. You need to use epoxy, not super glue.
--
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Sweet Witch
Be the flame, not the moth.
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-15
Gallifrey
reply to utahluge
Let's think about this - do you remember in Beverly Hills Cop where Axle used super glue to get fingerprints off a matchbook? It's an actual process police use because heating superglue causes it to turn in to a gas that adhere's to EVERYTHING and when it cools it turns into a 'solid', like spraying varnish on everything. It puts a thin layer, or shell, over each ridge of a fingerprint to preserve it.

Do you really want that all over where the fan is??
--
I'm a woman by the way .


Heterman
Premium
join:2004-02-28
Fayetteville, AR
reply to utahluge
I would think once it dried completly, there would be no smell.

kornphlake

join:2005-04-20
Portland, OR
reply to utahluge
super glue is kind of a weird glue, it actually cures with moisture rather than a solvent evaporating out of it like white school glue (water being the solvent in this case.) If you get super glue on your skin it cures almost instantly as it draws the ample moisture out of your skin, however if you put a drop on a piece of metal it may take several minutes for it to absorb enough moisture from the atmosphere to harden. The fingerprint trick works because the super glue will evaporate and deposit itself wherever moisture is present, such as in a fingerprint left on a matchbook.

As far as I know cured super glue is about as resistant to heat as acrylic is, I'd expect it to start softening at around 200F and melt at around 400F.


Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:10
It's not the melting point of the glue that effects the bond. It's the expanding and contracting of the part you have glued when exposed to heat.
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koolman2
Premium
join:2002-10-01
Anchorage, AK
reply to utahluge
All I know is that I rubbed some off of my fingers on an old piece of cloth, and it started smoking. That smoke stuff really burns when it gets in your eyes...
--
"I wonder if other dogs think poodles are members of a weird religious cult." -Rita Rudner

Eris2
Premium
join:2005-09-14
What was on the cloth?


seqrets
Premium
join:2001-05-03
Nederland, TX
reply to Johkal
said by Johkal:

It's not the melting point of the glue that effects the bond. It's the expanding and contracting of the part you have glued when exposed to heat.
As heating/cooling will cause the parts to expand/contract, you just contradicted yourself.

Unless the bonded parts are the same, they will also expand and contract at different rates which could cause the bond to prematurely fail. And Yes, heat can cause the bond to fail. At what temperature, I don't know?


koolman2
Premium
join:2002-10-01
Anchorage, AK
reply to Eris2
It was just an old piece of jeans that was laying around.


Johkal
Cool Cat
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join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:10

2 edits
reply to seqrets
said by seqrets:

said by Johkal:

It's not the melting point of the glue that effects the bond. It's the expanding and contracting of the part you have glued when exposed to heat.
As heating/cooling will cause the parts to expand/contract, you just contradicted yourself.

Unless the bonded parts are the same, they will also expand and contract at different rates which could cause the bond to prematurely fail. And Yes, heat can cause the bond to fail. At what temperature, I don't know?
I fail to see the contradiction! The melting point of the glue isn't the issue. The heat causes the part to expand & when it cools, it contracts. This expanding/contracting puts stress on the bond.
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seqrets
Premium
join:2001-05-03
Nederland, TX
My bad then!


EliteData
EliteData
Premium
join:2003-07-06
Long Island,
kudos:7
reply to utahluge
if youre looking to poison yourself and possibly die, burn the contents of cyanoacrylate and inhale it.
i find curing "crazy-glue" faster by using a can of air-duster on it, and no, not using it upside down either.
seems there is some type of chemical reaction between the chemical components of the air duster gases and the crazy glue that causes the glue to cure fast.
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koolman2
Premium
join:2002-10-01
Anchorage, AK
It's just compressed difluoroethane.

kornphlake

join:2005-04-20
Portland, OR
reply to EliteData
the cool air from a can of compressed air would cause moisture to condense on the parts being glued and accelerate the curing time.


superglue advice

@comcast.net
reply to utahluge
It's the moisture in the air that causes superglue to harden. Wait until it's all dry, then do what you want to it.


2kmaro
Think
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join:2000-07-11
ColossalCave
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to utahluge
Keep in mind that superglue isn't a one-stop-solution. It is superb where things glued together may be pulled on later (as in lifting a man with just a drop) or gets little or no force applied to it - as putting a broken cup back together.

BUT it has little shear strength - that is, it has poor resistance to twisting forces or side-to-side forces. So if the man being lifted by the single drop had twisted from side to side, he probably would have broken the bond.

Also, it is poor in dealing with being compressed/uncompressed over and over. It was actually considered for use in bonding 'caps' on teeth at one time, but tests showed that chewing (compressing and uncompressing) caused it to fail sooner than whatever it is they really use.


Cho Baka
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-23
there
kudos:2
2K, that was the best Cliff Claven answer in ages.
Good job, a thumb to you!
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The preceeding post may contain dry humor.


61999674
Gotta Do What Ya Gotta Do
Premium
join:2000-09-02
Here
kudos:1
reply to 2kmaro
Good job 2k - I have found "superglue" to be about worthless in most cases. An epoxy adhesive works MUCH better.
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Follow the Money


Johkal
Cool Cat
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join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:10
Yep, they haven't made a good super glue since the Eastman 911.


2kmaro
Think
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join:2000-07-11
ColossalCave
kudos:1

1 edit
reply to Cho Baka
said by Cho Baka:

2K, that was the best Cliff Claven answer in ages.
Good job, a thumb to you!
Things everyone should memorize (expect Geocities popups/cookies at the site).

Example - "'Stewardesses' is the longest word that is typed with only the left hand. "
--
...then THINK! again!!


Johkal
Cool Cat
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join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:10
Now I know where the term "Dork" comes from. Even funnier thinking about all the kids I called dorks.


Paulg
Displaced Yooper
Premium
join:2004-03-15
Neenah, WI
kudos:1
reply to EliteData
there are also accelerators for CA that basically wet the CA and force it to cure rapidly, but this seems to make a significantly weaker bond in my use.

Arctic