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rrando

join:2005-11-30
Northridge, CA

switching to dslextreme - question on setup

My service starts soon, I am switching from SBC.
I have a speedstream 5100b (purchased from SBC)-
I know its straitforward set it up as a bridge -
but besides setting up my router, and reconfiguring TCPIP
on my computer(s), is that all I have to do to the modem
to switch over? I want to cancel SBC and start
DSLExtreme on the same day ...


sded
Premium
join:2002-11-04
San Diego, CA

1 edit
What kind of router? I am using a 5100b on a DHCP connection with a Linksys wrt54g. A few minor complications because of the 5100b fixed IP. Set the 5100b to bridge mode. Plug the 5100b into a LAN port on your router. Jumper an ethernet cable between another LAN port and the WAN port. Use a fixed IP on your NIC so you can access both the router and the modem statistics. 5100b IP is 192.168.0.1. Linksys wrt54g default IP is 192.168.1.1. Set your NIC to something like 192.168.1.2, (important to get everything on the same subnet) mask to 255.255.0.0 and gateway to 192.168.1.1. If you let the NIC get an IP automatically you won't be able to see the modem. Your router should have a mode for DHCP to select. A bit different from the PPPOE setup, but pretty straightforward.

rrando

join:2005-11-30
Northridge, CA
Hi, thank you for the fast response.

Its a 5100b (5 lights) currently connected to SBC-Yahoo DSL, so I am able to access the modem at 192.168.0.1 through my wireless router (at 192.168.1.1). Router is secure: MAC address filtering, WEP AES/TKIP, hidden SSID, etc. (and firewalls on each computer). I can setup the router again, but I'm hoping that maybe I won't have to since its a minor hassle. (and I'd like to do everything wirelessly without a physical ethernet connection)...

As I understand it, I have to do the following:
1) change my modem to bridge mode -- the instructions are straitforward.
2) Use DHCP rather than PPPoe on the modem (does this happen automatically when configured as a bridge?) no account or password, its just "ON" -- the modem should now connect to the internet.
3) set up the wireless router to talk to the modem -- which is already the case, but -- The speedstream setup page on this site says:
"Plug the WAN or internet port of the router or firewall to the Ethernet port on the modem and set up a static IP, subnet mask, default gateway and DNS addresses on the WAN side of the router or firewall"

OK, I sort of understand this, but I'm still paranoid:
on the wireless router WAN setup menu:
static IP 192.168.0.1 - this is my modem's IP
or is it
static IP 192.168.1.1 - this is my wireless routers IP
subnet mask 255.255.0.0
default gateway -- run ipconfig to get the default gateway
Primary DNS: 66.51.205.100 - from DSLExtreme
Secondary DNS: 66.51.206.100

4) set up computers to talk to the router which is currently the case, but I need to remove the SBC DNS addresses from TCP/IP (make sure that TCP/IP in the local area connection is on “obtain an ip address automatically") and perhaps also remove or change the default gateway on the computer.

Comments/corrections much appreciated.


sded
Premium
join:2002-11-04
San Diego, CA

1 edit
1) OK
2) DHCP is done by the router. A bridge just sends all the data from the link to the router. What kind of wireless router do you have? Most have a DHCP setting, usually with a comment about cable modems.
3) The patching I suggested above will allow you to access both the DSL stream and the modem statistics at the same time-otherwise you need to move the cable from WAN to LAN to look at the modem. If you don't care, just plug into WAN port. Don't understand the quote unless you have a static IP-with DHCP you don't know the WAN IP and gateway. And don't need to. Do you have a static IP instead of dynamic (DHCP for DSLX)? If you do, DSLX will email you with numbers to fill in for your WAN settings, and you select "static IP" on your router setup.

The numbers you describe are all part of the LAN setup, not the WAN. If you have a DHCP mode on your router the WAN addresses should be filled in when you interrogate the DHCP server automatically. On a d-link or linksys there is nothing to fill in if you select dynamic ip on the WAN menu.

rrando

join:2005-11-30
Northridge, CA
OK, I think I understand better now. I have an airlink router (very similar to d-link) using the atheros chip. I will have DSLextreme dynamic IP - the least expensive option. I'm pretty sure there is a DHCP mode on the router - I'll go home tonight and check it out. It sounds even simpler than I imagined. Thanks for all your answers.

rrando

join:2005-11-30
Northridge, CA
reply to rrando
Thank You sded.
I followed your instructions, and after less than 10 minutes, here I am... I did not have to connect to my router by ethernet cable. for others with the same setup,
(windows xp, speedstream 5100b, airlink wireless router, formerly with SBC-Yahoo DSL) I did the following:

1 set up my 5100b modem to bridge mode (per instructions on this site)
2 set airlink wireless AR410W router to DHCP server enabled
confirmed router WAN page set as DHCP client
3 windows XP -> control panel -> network connections -> wireless network -> properties -> TC/PIP -> properties -> advanced -> configured as recommended on this site.

Bingo! I'm connected. No restart was needed.

I don't need to do this, but is there a way (besides direct connection with a cable) to access the modem wirelessly (192.168.0.1 doesn't seem to do it anymore) ?

Thank you again for the easy to understand answers.


sded
Premium
join:2002-11-04
San Diego, CA

1 edit
Easiest way is as suggested above. In bridge mode you are plugged into the WAN port on your router and can't see the LAN, where the modem firmware (IP) is. Try this:
1) Move the modem cable from the WAN port to a LAN port
2) Take another ethernet cable and jumper it from another LAN port to the WAN port
At your NIC (wired or wireless), make sure the netmask is set to 255.255.0.0 as warned by the message from the 5100b when you put it in bridge mode.
Most routers will let you do this and have access to both the modem and the DSL data simultaneously. If not, you will need to move the existing cable from the WAN port to a LAN port temporarily to see the modem, whether wired or wireless. Or use a separate switch between the modem and the router. There is nothing special about wireless-it is just another ethernet connection to your router.

rrando

join:2005-11-30
Northridge, CA
Thanks. I would only need to access the modem set-up if I wanted to change the modem from bridge mode back to PPPoE so I won't try to look at it now (nothing to see here, move along).

I mistakenly set all my NICs to get IP address automatically (per my own instructions). My router is configured only to connect to LAN IPs in a specific range. On Windows XP, there is an "alternate configuration" in TCP/IP properties which I had previously set to an allowed IP so one computer used that and worked fine. Another computer was trying to get (was assigned?) an address outside of the range and could not connect. I now have my computers with IPs specified using the "alternate configuration" tab. It could just be my imagination but perhaps that is the reason it seems to take a bit longer to connect after I turn on power.

My final few questions:

1) Should the NIC IP address be hardwired to the specific IPs I want? This also means setting the default gateway and primary/secondary DNS servers correctly 192.168.1.1 and 66.51.205.100 etc...

2) What is the purpose of the 5 IP addresses included in my account from DSLExtreme? It seems I only need one. my modem only has one LAN connector.


sded
Premium
join:2002-11-04
San Diego, CA
1) I hardwire my NICs and DNS servers so that if there is a problem I can always tell easily which computer. Also, if you use standby, will usually wake up faster. Minor convenience usually.
2) If you want separate WAN IP addresses on your computers (gamers, servers, ...) may be useful. Also helps if you need to swap modems; don't need to wait for your old DHCP connection lease to time out. Most people only use 1 and distribute DSL via the LAN, but there are a few who find them useful. Not me, so can't really expound on the virtues.


djrobx
Premium
join:2000-05-31
Valencia, CA
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·VOIPO
reply to rrando
quote:
1) Move the modem cable from the WAN port to a LAN port
2) Take another ethernet cable and jumper it from another LAN port to the WAN port
At your NIC (wired or wireless), make sure the netmask is set to 255.255.0.0 as warned by the message from the 5100b when you put it in bridge mode.
The only problem with that is the router will be able to see its own DHCP server. It will create a conflict with DSLX's DHCP server. That works if you are using PPPoE or static IP.

I've also had some strange experiences when doing that in the past. Connections that work for a day or two then packet loss, then connection death. It's as if the "loop" causes slow, progressive problems with the conection. Seemed to be the case with every router I tried, too.

Not for the faint of heart, but the cleaner way, with a WRT54G, is to get a linux prompt going, log into it and configure the WAN port for multiple IPs. I think Linux even lets you assign a static IP alongside a DHCP configured one. I now have all 8 of my static IPs plus 192.168.0.2 assigned to the WAN port, so I can utilize everything behind the WRT.

-- Rob
--
\\ROB - a part of the SCB local network


sded
Premium
join:2002-11-04
San Diego, CA

1 edit
Click for full size
wt54g setup
No problems with the dslx dhcp server on a single dhcp connection. The wrt54g is a wan dhcp client, lan dhcp server, so no conflict. Had it that way for quite some time with no issues. You can also use a switch between the modem and the router, run 1 cable each to the wan port and a lan port. Currently I am using a linux command in the firewall script to allow access to the modem on 192.168.0.1 on the WAN port, no LAN connection at all-but using third party firmware (Tofu11, dd-wrt) to make it work. Haven't set it up with multiple simultaneous WAN IP addresses, though.


djrobx
Premium
join:2000-05-31
Valencia, CA
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·VOIPO

3 edits
quote:
The wrt54g is a wan dhcp client, lan dhcp server,
DHCP is a broadcast protocol. So, if you bridge the LAN and WAN sides together with a patch cable as you have described, there is certainly a potential for conflict.

I don't doubt that it's working for you. I used to do the same thing with my MediaOne cable connection. It seemed to work because the router would request an IP before initializing its own DHCP server, and the renew requests seemed to go the right place. I'd just hesitate to recommend it to other people, especially without knowing what sort of router they're running. The results vary widely. As I mentioned, some routers absolutely cannot handle having their LAN and WAN sides bridged.

--
\\ROB - a part of the SCB local network


sded
Premium
join:2002-11-04
San Diego, CA

1 edit
Right, I only have done it with Linksys. If it doesn't work with the built in switch of the router, then either swapping cables from WAN to LAN or using an external switch to go to both the WAN and a LAN works. Since all the data is there and properly addressed, up to firmware on router to sort it out properly. If it doesn't, time for plan B as mentioned above. Least intrusive if router supports it is the single Linux command I use now.

rrando

join:2005-11-30
Northridge, CA
said by sded:

I hardwire my NICs and DNS servers ...
my NIC IPs are hardwired now -- seems to be more robust too

I don't have a WRT54G, so linux is out.

Thanks again to you all.