dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
9925
share rss forum feed


WaxPhoto
I AM SAM
Premium
join:2004-04-08
Salt Lake City, UT

5 recommendations

Punch Up Those Photos (Gimp Style)

Click for full size
Canon EOS 10D
17mm 1/180th F8 ISO100


ET's original
Click for full size
GIMP LAB Overlay Method
Click for full size
Canon EOS 10D
17mm 1/180th F8 ISO100


ET's apllication of Photoshop LAB Overlay Method
Translation/Derivative of the LAB Overlay Technique Edit This See Profile posted here: »Punch up those photos.......fast and easy.

A note before we begin: Its important to keep in mind Gimp treats the LAB colorspace very differently from Photoshop. For one, any changes you make will not be be visible until you do the final step. Gimp decomposes an image to the LAB colorspace using Grayscale layers, as opposed to PS's use of channels. In practice, this is more convenient for some operations, but less convenient overall. For this method... it is a bit more of a pain in the ass, with more steps. Here are those steps:

1)Open Image
2)Go to Image>Mode>Decompose
3)Check LAB, Check Decompose to Layers, hit OK
4)Open Layers dialog. Make only the B layer visible.
5)Duplicate B layer, set "B Copy" to overlay (Opacity is 100%).
6)Merge both B layers (Image>Merge Visible Layers/CTRL-M) Choose Expand as necessary (though other options don't make a difference in this case) Hit Ok.
7)Repeat steps #4 through #6 for the "A" layer.
8)Select "L" layer, apply a slight S curve, mostly adjusted towards the dark end of the curve. (GIMP's overlay is calculated a bit differently)
9)Image>Mode>Recompose and Make sure you select LAB with the correct layer order.

Thats it, the output will still be slightly more even of an exposure compared with PS... not quite as dark. (This may be a 8/16 bit side effect)
--
*Formerly known as LitteredMind* To see what is in front of one's nose needs a constant struggle. -George Orwell


Edit This
Premium
join:2001-05-08
kudos:6
Absolutely phenomenal work WaxPhoto See Profile. The Gimp image looks the best to my eyes.


WaxPhoto
I AM SAM
Premium
join:2004-04-08
Salt Lake City, UT
Thanks... Did you do anything other than what you posted to 3b.jpg? Maybe blurring A&B channels a little?


Edit This
Premium
join:2001-05-08
kudos:6

1 recommendation

said by WaxPhoto:

Thanks... Did you do anything other than what you posted to 3b.jpg? Maybe blurring A&B channels a little?
As far as the original image....No. I used just the steps I posted. I used two separate layers to create this one....but....I did use the original LAB technique although each layer was processed differently and then combined into the final image. »Re: Punch up those photos.......fast and easy.
--
I post therefore I am.


WaxPhoto
I AM SAM
Premium
join:2004-04-08
Salt Lake City, UT
Ok. One last question... In CS2, does this method work in 16 bit mode, and if so, was your output in 16 bit? (for the Image from your first post in that thread)
--
*Formerly known as LitteredMind* To see what is in front of one's nose needs a constant struggle. -George Orwell


34140721
Small Block Chevys Never Die..
Premium
join:2003-03-25
reply to Edit This
said by Edit This:

Absolutely phenomenal work WaxPhoto See Profile. The Gimp image looks the best to my eyes.
I concur...the Gimp photo is much better... Many thanks for sharing this and for your outstanding work...


Andrew J
Premium
join:2001-11-09
Lancaster, PA
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to WaxPhoto
You seem to be doing a slight variation of this adjustment that takes 3 seconds in Elements and 16 bit:
»www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutori···ment.htm
--
Best Team.


WaxPhoto
I AM SAM
Premium
join:2004-04-08
Salt Lake City, UT
This does so much more than local contrast enhancement, though. Disregarding the color change, it may have a somewhat similar effect, but this method is for more than "stretching out" the color DR, which is all LCE really does. This method actually differentiates between hues. Read through some of ET's past LAB links.
--
*Formerly known as LitteredMind* To see what is in front of one's nose needs a constant struggle. -George Orwell


Edit This
Premium
join:2001-05-08
kudos:6

1 edit
reply to Andrew J
said by Andrew J:

You seem to be doing a slight variation of this adjustment that takes 3 seconds in Elements and 16 bit:
»www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutori···ment.htm
From the link you provided Andrew J See Profile:

"Local contrast enhancement, as with sharpening, can also create unwanted color changes if performed on all three color channels. In addition, Local contrast enhancement can increase color saturation significantly. You can eliminate these unwanted effects by either performing local contrast enhancement in the lightness channel of the LAB color space, or in a separate layer (while still in an RGB working space) and blending using "luminosity" in the layers window.

Local contrast enhancement can also clip highlights in regions which are both very bright and adjacent to a darker region. For this reason, it should be performed before adjusting levels (if levels are used bring tones to the extreme highlights within the image histogram). This allows for a "buffer zone" when local contrast enhancement extends the lightest and darkest tones to full white or black, respectively.

Care should also be taken when using this technique because it can detract from the "smoothness" of tones within your image-- thereby changing its mood. Portrait photography is one area where one should be particularly cautious with this technique".


Nice link Andrew J See Profile.


Edit This
Premium
join:2001-05-08
kudos:6
reply to WaxPhoto
said by WaxPhoto:

Ok. One last question... In CS2, does this method work in 16 bit mode, and if so, was your output in 16 bit? (for the Image from your first post in that thread)
Yes it works in 16 bit mode.......No my posted output was 8 bit not 16.
--
I post therefore I am.


WaxPhoto
I AM SAM
Premium
join:2004-04-08
Salt Lake City, UT
said by Edit This:

said by WaxPhoto:

Ok. One last question... In CS2, does this method work in 16 bit mode, and if so, was your output in 16 bit? (for the Image from your first post in that thread)
Yes it works in 16 bit mode.......No my posted output was 8 bit not 16.
Ok. So now all I have to determine is if GIMP uses a different algorithm for overlay blending mode, compared to PS. If it doesn't, then it must be the LAB process that is different.
--
*Formerly known as LitteredMind* To see what is in front of one's nose needs a constant struggle. -George Orwell


timcuth
Braves Fan
Premium
join:2000-09-18
Pelham, AL
Reviews:
·Charter
·AT&T Southeast

1 edit
reply to WaxPhoto
Click for full size
Canon PowerShot A60
13.4mm 1/640th F4.5

Click for full size
Click for full size
I have been trying all day to get a handle on this technique. I have read several tutorials and, instead of them helping, I have only become more confused.

Here are three samples. Unedited is the shot straight from the camera. lab_no_contrast is only doing the overlay technique on the decomposed B and A layers. lab_contrast adds the s-curve to the L-layer. Does it appear that I am doing things, correctly?

I have more questions, but I will save them for a while.

Tim
--
I'm up on a tightrope. One side's fear and one is hope. - Leon Russell


timcuth
Braves Fan
Premium
join:2000-09-18
Pelham, AL
Reviews:
·Charter
·AT&T Southeast

1 edit
reply to WaxPhoto
PS - Sorry, I should have done something to make the files smaller. I was so focused on the technique I neglected to do so.

PPS - Never mind. I figured out how to fix it.

Tim
--
I'm up on a tightrope. One side's fear and one is hope. - Leon Russell

bobny1

join:2004-09-10
Bronx, NY
Click for full size
Click for full size
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XT
ISOARRAY(0xb666f60)

This is a Picture i took from my window today.