dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
3564
share rss forum feed


rawgerz
The hell was that?
Premium
join:2004-10-03
Grove City, PA

1 recommendation

bad idea..

I'm pretty sure I read in a few TOS from different cable CO's that if you do this, you will be permanently disconnected.

Or worse, they take you to court?



en102
Canadian, eh?

join:2001-01-26
Valencia, CA

1 edit

or worse... FBI showing up at your door with a warrant due to tampering, end up being hauled away with your possessions seized, and possibly spending some time in prison.



justin
..needs sleep
Australian
join:1999-05-28
kudos:15

1 recommendation

reply to rawgerz

yes if you read my review I mention that more than once. Nevertheless, the book exists and it is not illegal to purchase it, or read it.



FFH
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
reply to rawgerz

said by rawgerz:

I'm pretty sure I read in a few TOS from different cable CO's that if you do this, you will be permanently disconnected.

Or worse, they take you to court?
Yes, you can find in the Comcast forum a number of posts of those who got caught and then come whine about how the big bad cable company permanently disconnected them from all cable services - including TV.
»/nsearch?q=unc···t7951755
»/nsearch?q=unc···82158759
--
--
Join Red Room Forum
BLOG tkjunkmail.blogspot.com
My Web Page


FFH
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
reply to justin

said by justin:

yes if you read my review I mention that more than once. Nevertheless, the book exists and it is not illegal to purchase it, or read it.
Yes, it is legal and it very similar in ethics to those books on how to make homemade bombs. Perfectly legal and upheld in court numerous times on free speech grounds. But I would hope legitimate companies would refuse to carry and sell these books.
--
--
Join Red Room Forum
BLOG tkjunkmail.blogspot.com
My Web Page


pb5k
Can't Triforce
Premium
join:2005-11-16
Glendale, AZ
Reviews:
·CenturyLink

1 recommendation

reply to rawgerz

I believe in some jurisdictions, yes, it could be considered "theft of service" and you could be taken to court for it, though most likely they will simply disconnect someone who uncaps. And as I understand it, the docsis protocol is pretty draconian and uncappers aren't hard to find.

Aside from that, it is the epitome of greed and selfishness. If there were uncappers on every block, service could degrade to less-than-dialup speeds.
--
"When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer 'Present' or 'Not guilty.'" --
Theodore Roosevelt


Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1
reply to rawgerz

doing what the book says can be illegal under theft of service(atleast the uncapping), the Author writing it and us owning and reading the book is thankfully still protected as a freedom of the press.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports



Bill
Premium,VIP
join:2001-12-09
reply to rawgerz

»Nailed to the Wall



tiger72
SexaT duorP
Premium
join:2001-03-28
Saint Louis, MO
kudos:1
reply to FFH

Why? let the kiddies get permbanned by their ISP. Their parents will definitely appreciate it.



Nerdtalker
Working Hard, Or Hardly Working?
Premium,MVM
join:2003-02-18
Tucson, AZ
reply to Bill

I still remember that.

The good days of cable modem uncapping are over. Now, pretty much all bandwidth management is done through QoS policies instated at the headend itself, fewer and fewer cable ISPs are using the cable modems to enforce the bandwidth caps because of this specific vulnerability.

As long as the customer has access to the thing, it's vulnerable. QoS policies and headend-based management take those out of the user's hands, completely. Those two essentially render all the old serial-based SurfBoard hacks obsolete. There still are some neat things you can do, but not legally, or without getting caught.
--
"Some people never see the light till it shines thru bullet holes." -Bruce Cockburn

I'm testing Gmail's spam filters: Broadbandreports1@gmail.com
Spam: 12900+ messages currently using 406 MB.


bmn
? ? ?
Premium,ExMod 2003-06
join:2001-03-15
hiatus
reply to FFH

said by FFH:

But I would hope legitimate companies would refuse to carry and sell these books.
Based on that logic, if something CAN be used for bad, then companies shouldn't carry it or sell it ?

Just about everything in your home would suddenly be gone from the shelves of every store.

Bleach, gone (because it can be used to make chlorine bombs more easily that you can hack your cable modem)... Guns, gone... Cars, all gone. Computes, poof! Phones, yep, them too. Children's Tylenol, done for...

No, that doesn't work. Instead of preventing this type of information from getting out, perhaps a consorted effort to show its value and explain its legitimate uses should be made ?

And of course, keeping the book from stores doesn't prevent someone with the slightest clue from firing up the internet and using Google.
--
Ann Coulter doesn't know jack about science...
"Extremes to the right and left of any political dispute are always wrong." —Dwight Eisenhower


dvd536
as Mr. Pink as they come
Premium
join:2001-04-27
Phoenix, AZ
kudos:4
reply to rawgerz

said by rawgerz:

I'm pretty sure I read in a few TOS from different cable CO's that if you do this, you will be permanently disconnected.

Or worse, they take you to court?
Remember the buckeye cable incident?
speeds are now up there where uncapping is not worth the hassle.
--
You can never be too rich, too thin or have too much Bandwidth


rawgerz
The hell was that?
Premium
join:2004-10-03
Grove City, PA
reply to justin

I would try it just to see what it and if, it did anything. But I fear being cut off too much to ever attempt it.
I couldn't read it just too tempting



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:6
reply to FFH

said by FFH:

Yes, it is legal and it very similar in ethics to those books on how to make homemade bombs. Perfectly legal and upheld in court numerous times on free speech grounds. But I would hope legitimate companies would refuse to carry and sell these books.
Hmmmm....

On one hand you say that the book is perfectly legal, then on the other hand admonish legitimate companies that might carry a legal product.
--
A is A


Michieru2
zzz zzz zzz
Premium
join:2005-01-28
Miami, FL

1 recommendation

reply to FFH

Then it's best said to ban computer books which allow programmers to code applications. I like companies who carry books like these whether it be legitimate or not. Or do you think we should start burning these books simply because of there content?

Just like we should ban all guns to be given to citizens and only allow the army to have them. Or you think you are ok with them showing a burning flag but not of these muslims with a head shaped as a bomb because "it offends" them.

If you are going to be moral police on books you better apply it to everything and anything not just books and then you will see how unethical it really sounds.



phattieg

join:2001-04-29
Winter Park, FL

1 edit
reply to FFH

said by FFH:

Yes, you can find in the Comcast forum a number of posts of those who got caught and then come whine about how the big bad cable company permanently disconnected them from all cable services - including TV.
»/nsearch?q=unc···t7951755
»/nsearch?q=unc···82158759
Yes, I will say that the CMTS is capable of running scripts under certain conditions. One condition, exceeding bandwidth allowance, auto-generates a ticket to one of the national ticket centers, and they review the log. Once they find the culprit, they determine the node they are on, and if you are persistent enough (keep hacking with spoofed MAC's) then they simply send a maintainence guy out to the neighborhood, and will disconnect you at the tap. Don't ask me how they locate people, but I think it has something to do with which return channel and amplifier you talk to the node with. Not sure about other companies, but about 3 years ago, I offered to "explore" the ability of undetectable hacking. Lets just say I wasn't able to get permission, but discovered a co-worker's roommate did it, and he was caught within 24 hours, woke up to no internet, came to work with supervisors waiting to talk to him about "why he hacked his modem". Luckly, he DOES have a roommate, and explained the situation. They took his internet away for about 3 years, and it took lots of occasional begging to get it back. He ended up having to prove his roommate wasn't living there anymore. This was 6 years ago, and I'm sure it's gotten much better. Although it would be neat to try, I definately wouldn't do it from my house, or modem.
--
SIPPhone/Gizmo # 17476200648 / PIMPNET Chatline / Ran by Asterisk & Slackware 10.1.


91439306
15,000 Watts of Bass Power

join:2002-10-16
New Milford, CT

1 recommendation

reply to bmn

Not so. The government won't take away things that are required to earn a TAXABLE INCOME. So cars definately stay, even though auto accidents kill more people in a year than the Viet Nam war.



cwy1980
Premium
join:2004-08-10
Monmouth Junction, NJ
reply to Michieru2

Should books discussing computer security/exploits be banned? How about all those books about rootkits that populate the shelves at Barnes and Nobles or Borders? What about the books talking about defeating WEP/WAP-enabled encryption on wireless routers?

Under your logic TKjunkmail, these are just as bad.

However they serve a helluva good purpose...they provide the information necessary for system administrators to ensure that as many vulnerabilities are assessed and addressed for their networks as is possible.

Don't bash a book because it contains information that can be used as an exploit. Anything can be used in a negative manner in life...
--
Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy



HarryTorres
Harry Torres
Premium
join:2001-11-21
Allentown, PA
Reviews:
·RCN CABLE
reply to rawgerz

said by rawgerz:

I'm pretty sure I read in a few TOS from different cable CO's that if you do this, you will be permanently disconnected.

Or worse, they take you to court?
Exactly...why would anyone hack a cable network? Bandwidth is dirt cheap now a days...I'm paying for 15/2
--
Harry M. Torres Jr.


Michieru2
zzz zzz zzz
Premium
join:2005-01-28
Miami, FL
reply to cwy1980

These books also inform the reader of the actual fact of things. If a company was lying to you saying that the service is secure yet there was a high rate of identity theft. Nobody would really know it's the encryption of the wireless routers which is failing. These books exploit facts of these wireless technologies that inform the reader and then everybody will know where the problem is occuring and avoid such products.



rachelsfx

join:2004-09-27
Pensacola, FL
reply to rawgerz

Funny, this guy is probably just asking for the FBI to visit.



2kmaro
Think
Premium,ExMod 1 BC
join:2000-07-11
ColossalCave
kudos:1
reply to dvd536

Oh, someone will be tempted. How I long for the good old days of uncapped service via @Home - as much as 8-10mbps down, a couple of meg up, on an old SB-3100. Then along came capping.

But I'd rather keep my connection, spend my days in the park instead of the "yard" than to get a little more speed above the 4mbps I have now.

Good review, and I agree that understanding how things work is always helpful, especially around this particular site.
--
Travel light. Never let yesterday get in the way of tomorrow.


thefoxbox
go fox box go
Premium
join:2004-10-14
Irving, TX
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·ViaTalk
·Time Warner Cable
reply to John Galt

said by John Galt:

said by FFH:

Yes, it is legal and it very similar in ethics to those books on how to make homemade bombs. Perfectly legal and upheld in court numerous times on free speech grounds. But I would hope legitimate companies would refuse to carry and sell these books.
Hmmmm....

On one hand you say that the book is perfectly legal, then on the other hand admonish legitimate companies that might carry a legal product.
Could you clear this up for me? You said that "on the other hand you [warn] legitimate companies that might carry a legal product." Elaborate, please.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:6

said by thefoxbox:

Elaborate, please.
Definition 2: to reprove or scold

»dictionary.reference.com/browse/admonish
--
A is A


Jerm

join:2000-04-10
Richland, WA
kudos:2

1 edit
reply to en102

Not what happend to me...

Back when @Home folded and Charter had to switch me to their own broadband, I got super pissed because my bandwidth was cut from 4-6mbps actual down to 768k! Same price and everything! So...

I hacked my cable modem. I saw the very first widely published article how the guy described the config replacement hack. I was able to change my speed caps and allow my modem to pull multiple IPs from the network.

Worked great for months until my sister one day loaded up a P2P app and uploaded @ 3mbps for half a day. Oops I got caught, and thought I was in big trouble. Fortunately since it was the very beginning of the whole uncapping fad going mainstream I was able to meet with their network engineer and showed him how I did it. He was satisfied, so they let me keep my account (Charter 768kbps down 128kbps up, what a friggin joke though!)

Now the config files are much more secure, and uncapping is just not doable unless you completely hack your firmware and change your MAC. Even then its still not worth it. I'm happy to pay Charter for my 10mbps, but looking forward to Fios in my area

In no way do I cone hacking the modem. It can't be done these days anyways - at least not with hacks I used. Pay for your service, or if really deperate be happy on your leeched wireless connection


thefoxbox
go fox box go
Premium
join:2004-10-14
Irving, TX
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·ViaTalk
·Time Warner Cable
reply to John Galt

Re: bad idea..

said by John Galt:

said by thefoxbox:

Elaborate, please.
Definition 2: to reprove or scold

»dictionary.reference.com/browse/admonish
Sorry, I'm stupid. I like using smaller words that the general user community can understand. [/end common sense]

thefoxbox
go fox box go
Premium
join:2004-10-14
Irving, TX
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·ViaTalk
·Time Warner Cable
reply to Jerm

Re: Not what happend to me...

said by Jerm:

Now the config files are much more secure, and uncapping is just not doable unless you completely hack your firmware and change your MAC. Even then its still not worth it. I'm happy to pay Charter for my 10mbps, but looking forward to Fios in my area

In no way do I cone hacking the modem. It can't be done these days anyways - at least not with hacks I used. Pay for your service, or if really deperate be happy on your leeched wireless connection
Funny. I like how you say that. "Pay for your service." But, the thing that's going to force me to buy an older modem just so I can do it is because I was downgraded by 2MB and no one seems to know why, and still can't even maintain a steady speed. I get between 1-4.5 Mbps on average on a 6mb plan. Nice logic--if only the cable company would deliver on their promise.


Elcabong
Cuba SI, Castro NO

join:2000-03-09
Philadelphia, PA
reply to rawgerz

Re: bad idea..

The book goes into detail on how not to get noticed by your isp. I've been to derengel's forums and website and although I wouldn't risk it, I understand why someone who's pissed off and shortchanged by the big companies would try this method.


smcallah

join:2004-08-05
Home
reply to 91439306

I think you forgot to count the 1 - 2 million Vietnamese deaths during the Vietnam War.

I think they'd ban cars if that many people were dying per year.



91439306
15,000 Watts of Bass Power

join:2002-10-16
New Milford, CT

No, they wouldn't, because it's impossible to tax people who aren't working and earning income. Without a car, 95% of the US population wouldn't be able to earn income.