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nitemare

join:2000-05-11
Klamath Falls, OR

Outdoor washer and dryer?

I currently have washer and dryer hookups on the outside of my home along my house wall. But, there is no shelter for it. Has anyone had any experience with weatherproofing their outdoor laundry area? So far, the options that I'm thinking about are...

1. Buy some small shed from Costco.com and use extensions to hookup the gas (tubing?), electrical (extension cord), and water (garden hose) to the shed through a shed window.

2. Hire a building contractor to build a shelter attached to my home.

I like the second option. But, I feel that it may be worth too much for little benefit. Any advice? Thanks



CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County

To be legal and up to code I would think it would have to be built and not a small plastic shed or the like.



Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
reply to nitemare

My own opinion would be that you would not want to use an extension cord, a garden hose, and tubing to run utilities to your washer and dryer, not to mention a drain. If you're not "handy" enough to deal with adding the feeds properly, hire someone who is. You're not talking about building a 20x20' garage... just a simple laundry enclosure. Get it done right... you won't be sorry in the long run!
--
I was born at night... but not last night!



CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
reply to nitemare

Is there no way to get the washer/dryer inside? might be cheaper to get a plumber to run lines inside than create a room outside and have plumbing run to that.
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain


WVBill

join:2008-07-04
Summit Point, WV
reply to nitemare

You could buy the shed from Costco and set it up so that one gable end is right up against the outside wall of your house where the washer and dryer hookups are. Don't actually connect it to the house. Cut a hole in that gable end big enough to access the hookups.
It wouldn't be totally weather proof but being in SoCal you don't have that much weather anyway.

WVBill



nitemare

join:2000-05-11
Klamath Falls, OR

1 edit
reply to nitemare

Ok, I guess I'll see how much various contractors will charge to do a small enclosure.

I hope it won't be something like double the price of a pre-made shed. Otherwise, I'll just use WVBill's idea . I guess I'm just a cheap guy. But, the idea of paying double or more for something that can be gotten pre-manufactured seems like too much for an enclosure that has nothing to do with living space.

Is there no way to get the washer/dryer inside? might be cheaper to get a plumber to run lines inside than create a room outside and have plumbing run to that.
Actually, all the fixtures are there (gas, water, electricity, drainage). They are just located outside the house along the wall. So, there shouldn't be any need for additional plumbing. I just need a standard hose segment to get from the fixture to the washer.


TODarling
U.S. Army Retired
Premium
join:2004-11-27
Fort Smith, AR
reply to nitemare

Before this thread runs amuck the OP lives in California. I Have also seen this in the Part of Arkansas where I live. I am from Michigan and would have never thought of people doing this. But it seems to be a common practice where winter temps don't get that low. There is probably nothing the OP needs to do code wise. The only issue is convience.
--
Fighting for peace is like screwing for virginity.



jayco437
Premium
join:2001-08-11
Lincoln, NE

1 recommendation

said by TODarling:

The only issue is convience.
Sounds like it might be pretty convenient for some bums to come use the OP's washer and dryer while he's off at work


mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3

said by jayco437:

Sounds like it might be pretty convenient for some bums to come use the OP's washer and dryer while he's off at work
As long as the bums fluff and fold the stuff in the dryer, I'd be OK with it!!



beck
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-29
On The Road
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Stablehost.com

1 recommendation

reply to nitemare

My Mom and Dad had their washer and dryer outside. They had plastic covers they slid over each one when not in use. They didn't have them under a shelter. Just on the side of the house. Over the years, they replaced the covers several times. I think they got the covers at a regular hardware store. Only replaced the washer and dryer once. They lived in San Diego.
--
Some people are like slinkies - not really good for much.
But they bring a smile to your face when pushed down the stairs.



joako
Premium
join:2000-09-07
/dev/null
kudos:6
reply to nitemare

If you are really handy, just build 3 walls (one with a door, of course!) and a flat shingle roof over it. Probably costs the same as the shed, and will be more durable.
--
PRescott7-2097



mr_slick

join:2003-05-22
Lynnwood, WA
reply to nitemare

outside? really??

thought this was a joke thread, but apparently not...

i would put them inside (assuming there is an area on the other side of the wall that would work out-- then just change the fittings and plugs to terminate inside)

otherwise build (or have built) an enclosure [addition] attached to the house.

don't even think about the shed, extension cord, garden hose idea



eberglar
Thanks for the memories
Premium
join:2001-03-04
Henderson, NV
reply to nitemare

Where will the hot water come from if you use a garden hose?



nitemare

join:2000-05-11
Klamath Falls, OR
reply to nitemare

My Mom and Dad had their washer and dryer outside. They had plastic covers they slid over each one when not in use. They didn't have them under a shelter. Just on the side of the house. Over the years, they replaced the covers several times. I think they got the covers at a regular hardware store. Only replaced the washer and dryer once. They lived in San Diego.
Hmm... I guess covers would work fine. Maybe get a small platform in case rainwater rises a bit too high. Were the covers designed for the washer and dryer? Or was it something makeshift?

Where will the hot water come from if you use a garden hose?
It would be 2 garden hoses since I have 2 water fixtures: 1 for hot and 1 for cold water.

And yes, living in Southern California gives me some benefit of not having to worry about extreme weather conditions.


yock
TFTC
Premium
join:2000-11-21
Miamisburg, OH
kudos:3

Simple garden hoses wouldn't work. You might be safe from the elements in Southern California, but the hot water line wouldn't be kind to a garden hose. You'd definitely want something vulcanized. You can get vulcanized garden hoses.

That being said, I agree with others that something more permanent would be better. Nice weather or not, outdoor W/D hookups just seems to be an incredibly stupid architect's attempt at saving interior space.



Idjk

@embarqhsd.net
reply to nitemare

Until my mother died and my dad sold house we always had washer outside (Florida), dad did built a hinged roof with window sash weights for counter balance to keep some weather off . It was that way for maybe 30 years on patio off garage in back yard, it did have a drain hook up for city sewer- mom used clothes line I don't recall that she had a dryer but that was 30yrs ago.


itguy05

join:2005-06-17
Carlisle, PA
reply to eberglar

said by eberglar:

Where will the hot water come from if you use a garden hose?
The new "save the Earth from Global Warming" nuts say cold wash all the time. It's true - many new washers are omiting the hot cycle or making hot the equivalent of the old warm.....


yock
TFTC
Premium
join:2000-11-21
Miamisburg, OH
kudos:3

1 recommendation

said by itguy05:

said by eberglar:

Where will the hot water come from if you use a garden hose?
The new "save the Earth from Global Warming" nuts say cold wash all the time. It's true - many new washers are omiting the hot cycle or making hot the equivalent of the old warm.....
Those are the same people who don't understand that it isn't the soap that kills germs, but rather the hot water. Soap is for de-emulsifying dirt and oils on surfaces so that they can be rinsed with water.


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT

1 edit

said by yock:

[...] it isn't the soap that kills germs, but rather the hot water.
QFT. But again, if you wash with cold water you leave the germs, have better chances of getting allergies and require meds, doctors make some money, pharmaceutical companies make some money, insurance companies increase premiums and profit - everyone wins (except you, but who gives a sh1t )
My washer gets hot water at 150-155F

lhamp
Premium
join:2000-02-20
Stone Mountain, GA
reply to nitemare

LOL!
When I first met my current wife some 20 years ago, she was living in a 500 sq. foot cabin in Sun Valley Calif. She didn't have a washer/dryer. Went to the laundrymat once a week. She was on well fare living with 2 very young kids and her Brother.
Then I came along. Moved in with the clan. She thought I was "rich". LOL.
Anyway I did go out and buy a used washer/dryer, but there was no place to put it inside the shack. So I put them outside under the kitchen window. I built an enclosure around them with a lid to keep them from the weather.
Only problem was there was no hookups for water or electricity. To solve that we would just open the kitchen window, plug the line for juice inside at an outlet. For water we connected the lines to the kitchen sink. For the water discharge I ran a line to the outside acre and let it drain there.
Looking back, that was something I didn't think anyone would ever have to deal with.My wife and I laugh about it now. But there you go.
It's funny how things pop up here.



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to yock

said by yock:

Those are the same people who don't understand that it isn't the soap that kills germs, but rather the hot water. Soap is for de-emulsifying dirt and oils on surfaces so that they can be rinsed with water.
And there are others that think that washing clothes in hot water are going to kill germs too. Recommended temp usually for a hot water heater is usually around 140 degrees. Temps less then 140 degrees will just tease germs, bacteria, etc. And if your water heater is set at 140, I'll guarantee you that what's coming out of the washing machine isn't.

If you want to kill germs at cooler temperatures, use bleach.


stevek1949
We're not in Kansas anymore
Premium
join:2002-11-13
Virginia Beach, VA
reply to nitemare

A permanent shed may require a fixed floor. Code may require that. Any plumbing/electrical/gas changes would require the proper permits and licensed contractors. Sounds like it may become quite costly.



yock
TFTC
Premium
join:2000-11-21
Miamisburg, OH
kudos:3
reply to cdru

140 degrees F is the temperature at which most bacteria cease to grow. I know that's worth something.



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

said by yock:

140 degrees F is the temperature at which most bacteria cease to grow. I know that's worth something.
Cease to grow does not necessarily equate to killing the microbe. Look up water pasteurization and you'll find that 65 degrees C (149 degrees F) is required to kill the majority of microbes known to cause issues for humans. This temperature should be maintained for approximately 1 minute. Hotter temperatures can shorten this duration.

Bill03
Premium
join:2007-11-26
Richmond, VA
reply to yock

Like yock said garden hoses won't do it. Pick up a set of washer hoses at your local home improvement store. I prefer the ones with the metal braid as the outside covering. They last longer and are stronger.



ninjatutle
Premium

join:2006-01-02
San Ramon, CA

1 recommendation

reply to nitemare

  
You could use something like this for simple and cheap protection.


mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3

said by ninjatutle:

You could use something like this for simple and cheap protection.
Cheap??? Have you ever gone out and bought one of those???!!


madiany

@charter.com
reply to nitemare

I also live in monterey park and the code enforcement people here are a mother. started enclosing my patio and they came and made me take it down gave me a fine when i took out a permit to do it the same way. not only that i moved my washer and dryer into the garage and they saw that made me get a permit for that to show them that i had the proper pipe buried for the gas line. they also fined me for not pulling a permit for that. At the city hall here on Newmark st they told me i even needed to pull a permit when i change an indoor light fixture. my mom and dad have theirs covered with a steel shed with the back cut out against the wall from sears been like that for about 15 years also in MP come see it if you like.



zevin
Premium
join:2008-11-11
Texas
reply to nitemare

At my fishing getaway I have a propane water heater and needed a washer. I didn't want to spend a lot so I hooked the washer up with a garden hose to the hot water heater drain connection. Hey it's built for a hose. But after a few washes the water was so hot it made the hose balloon out and bust. Did I learn, heck no I went out and got a breaded washer hose and reconnected it all back up. Oh, the drain is a pool vacuum hose out to the grass.



Candoo3

join:2005-01-24
reply to TODarling

Friends in central Florida have the same setup, and it seems others in their area do as well. The place was built in the 50's. The laundry *shed* (about 8x8) has a cement slab floor w/wood framed walls. Been a few years, but as I recall services came in underground (very sandy soil), black flex plastic for water. Until now, I never thought about how they drain, but I would suspect that it ties into their septic bed. From a conversation, their septic is massive, and uses a very large area off to the side of the house.