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« So all those teens....WTH!? »
This is a sub-selection from Not apples here.


maartena
Elmo
Premium
join:2002-05-10
Orange, CA
kudos:3
reply to CycloneGT2

Re: Not apples here.

said by CycloneGT2:

I like how they compare the US internationally to a lot of smaller countries. Its a lot easier for a small country to get 100% wired up for fiber than it is for a nation as vast as the USA. If they were to compare South Korea or Holland to say just New Jersey, how would that compare?
On the other hand, if you would compare the entire EU to the United States, I'm afraid that the EU would still beat us in connectivity.

Granted, the EU has been expanded with some countries that aren't connected as well (Romania, Bulgaria, etc) but if you leave the post-2007 expansion out of it, the "old" EU still has well over 350 million residents, and overall is better connected for a cheaper price.

I think the biggest difference is that ISP's in the EU are heavily regulated, whereas in the US they are not.


kamm

join:2001-02-14
Brooklyn, NY

2 edits

1 recommendation

said by maartena:

said by CycloneGT2:

I like how they compare the US internationally to a lot of smaller countries. Its a lot easier for a small country to get 100% wired up for fiber than it is for a nation as vast as the USA. If they were to compare South Korea or Holland to say just New Jersey, how would that compare?
On the other hand, if you would compare the entire EU to the United States, I'm afraid that the EU would still beat us in connectivity.

Granted, the EU has been expanded with some countries that aren't connected as well (Romania, Bulgaria, etc) but if you leave the post-2007 expansion out of it, the "old" EU still has well over 350 million residents, and overall is better connected for a cheaper price.
Actually you'd be foolish to leave the new countries out of it or at least some of them: Hungary's or Czech's infrastructure is top-notch when it comes to broadband, especially mobile broadband (for example HSDPA, which is still only exists in printed AT&T marketing crap, is long available in every city in Hungary, with multi-megabit speeds.)
It's not an accident that latest 4G LTE tests were conducted by Verizon were mostly held in Budapest, Madrid and Düsseldorf.
My bro back in Budapest upgraded his DSL to an open ended (15Mb/s was guaranteed, up to 20Mbit depending on his distance) ADSL2+ connection in 2006 and that's when it was launched across the entire market, not some early deployment.

Ironically these countries' advantage was their former disadvantage: with the large influx of Western capital in the early 90s their archaic 80s infrastructure (phone and data networks) were quickly replaced with the latest technologies in the 90s so they are reaping their rewards of their long 'tech-starved' decades now...

BTW by today the Hungarian telecom giant - owned by Deutsche Telekom, of course, who else? - pretty much swallowed most of the surrounding countries' telecoms (much like MOL, the Hungarian oil company did with surrounding oil/gas companies and refineries etc.)

I think the biggest difference is that ISP's in the EU are heavily regulated, whereas in the US they are not.
Correct. However apparently they work better than our corrupt, crooked, quasi-monopoly-based "market" which these rotten monopolies dare to call "free market" with straight face...
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said by bicker:

Waaaa waaaa waaaa. You just want what you want and don't care to factor in what is right or true. Your perspectives are un-American, and deserve far more ridicule than I'm prepared to pile on them.