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88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

1 recommendation

reply to en102

Re: 95% can be real if... it determines what 95% coverage is.

said by en102:

quote:
Kentucky residents and local ISPs generally laugh hysterically at the 95% coverage claim, and insist that Connected Nation is simply putting on a very well-produced dog and pony show.
I suspect that they are doing the 'following':
95% (of those in cities of +100k residents),
not 95% of the land

Lies, lies, and .... statistics!
Well if an area is totally unihhabited is it REALLY necessary to have broadband there? Kentucky is very rual outside the "big" cities. In areas where there aren't any people I don't think ISPs should have to put in broadband to make a map look fuller.

Sammer

join:2005-12-22
Canonsburg, PA
said by 88615298:

Well if an area is totally unihhabited is it REALLY necessary to have broadband there? Kentucky is very rual outside the "big" cities. In areas where there aren't any people I don't think ISPs should have to put in broadband to make a map look fuller.
Any broadband mapping would have to include a reasonable definition of minimum population density such as XX/square mile.


88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness
said by Sammer:

said by 88615298:

Well if an area is totally unihhabited is it REALLY necessary to have broadband there? Kentucky is very rual outside the "big" cities. In areas where there aren't any people I don't think ISPs should have to put in broadband to make a map look fuller.
Any broadband mapping would have to include a reasonable definition of minimum population density such as XX/square mile.
Is this detailed enough for you?

»ftp://ftp.connectedtn.org/CTPublic/Con···sity.jpg

iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
reply to 88615298
Easy solution: WiMAX. Before you tune me out, it'll cover long distances with the right antennas, and it'll fill all those peksy coverage holes. If a WiMAX tower gets overloaded due to lots of subscribers, you've found a place that might be economical to wire. Simple as that


88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness
said by iansltx:

Easy solution: WiMAX. Before you tune me out, it'll cover long distances with the right antennas, and it'll fill all those peksy coverage holes. If a WiMAX tower gets overloaded due to lots of subscribers, you've found a place that might be economical to wire. Simple as that
I'm not against WiMax it's just like BPL all I heard for year is how it's the next big thing then nothing ever happens. I remember reading in 2000 how by 2010 BPL was going to be a major player in broadband and how you were going to be able to get super cheap and fast interent from your electric company even if you lived in the boonies

Sammer

join:2005-12-22
Canonsburg, PA
reply to iansltx
said by iansltx:

Easy solution: WiMAX.
It's a solution but it's not necessarily easy. There seems to be the mistaken belief that WiMAX was developed for rural areas. It was originally developed (just like LTE) for metro areas. It has been found that it (Revision E) works reasonably well in some rural areas but those towers, equipment and radio spectrum are not inexpensive. Once those towers are both in place and paid for it becomes a relatively inexpensive "last mile" solution.


Anon 51

@rr.com
reply to 88615298
Or you could put up another radio. This would create a self-healing mesh, with overlapping coverage. No overload..
It would just roll over to the next available, less busy radio. They have built a system like this in Palm Desert, California. Works VERY well.!

iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
What tehcnology are they using? How big of an area are they covering? Most rural wireless has to have antennas pointed at subscribers and vice versa, to the nondirectional nature of a mesh doesnt make as much sense.

iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
reply to 88615298
Key difference: BPL causes lots of interference. WiMAX has its own spectrum.

Also, BPL *does* work, provided you can get cheap bandwidh to the substation etc. Which probably isn't doable out in the sticks anyway. Though if you look through the DSLR forums you'll see a few successful BPL customers through DirecTV...or was it Dish...speeds were 1.5 Mbps both ways.

Though WiMAX can deliver more, comparable to a DOCSIS 1.1 cable system. Doesn't sound like much to in-town people but great for out-of-towners.

iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
reply to Sammer
WiMAX is not as inexpensive as, say, Motorola Canopy on the tower end ($12k for a second order diversity system plus antennas versus several thousand for Canopy versus less for other systems). However the subscriber units aren't all that bad; $350 or so for something that, with an antenna, can do well in rural areas, if you know where to look.

me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
reply to iansltx
It was directv.

What kinda speeds can 1.1 do?

iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
38 Mbps down, 10 up, per node. Though WiMAX, at its top modulation on 10MHz channels (doable but not in all circumstances) is 35 and 4 if memory serves. 5MHz channels, which may be more common, are half that of course but as you can see with ClearWire 6 Mbps down and 1 Mbps up is very doable.

me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
Cool. A 6/1 wireless would be better IMHO than a 5/less than 1 DSL.


marigolds
Gainfully employed, finally
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-13
Saint Louis, MO
kudos:2
reply to 88615298
said by 88615298:

Is this detailed enough for you?

»ftp://ftp.connectedtn.org/CTPublic/Con···sity.jpg
According to their metadata, that's just 2000 census info. Very out of date.
Here's something interesting though...
This is from their map server. Looks like ConnectTn is a lot more than ConnectTn.