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Lazlow

join:2006-08-07
Saint Louis, MO
reply to meh37II

Re: 100% first

Wireless will be an option in some areas but in a lot of areas it is just a no go. If you look at the way houses were built (geographically) in the area I mentioned, you will see that most of the homes were built in valleys. This means they loose their line of sight and wireless does not work. The reason the houses are built in these valleys is due to the wind(1 tree per square mile is common, so nothing to stop the wind) and lightning (if the house is in the valley it is not the highest thing around).

IF they put down the new lines to these areas it is highly likely that they will put down fiber. The majority of the expense is burying the cable not how much the cable costs. So the price difference between the fiber and wire itself becomes insignificant. This becomes even more likely when one considers upgrades. On fiber when you upgrade you pretty much just change the equipment at both ends. With most wire based upgrades they usually need to upgrade the wire itself, an easy example of this is when they started moving to D3 here in St. Louis. It was massively delayed becuase so much of the cable had to be replaced (D1 era cable).

DSL and its variants usually just drop out due to distance issues. With many of these areas having less than 10 people per square mile, dsl would require a RO/RT for every 3(ball park) homes(mom,dad, two kids). They also would need new lines ran due to the limited number of lines buried in the 70s.


meh37II

@verizon.net
I'm still hopeful (silly me) that something useful will come from white-spaces... useful, and [relatively] cheap.

Sammer

join:2005-12-22
Canonsburg, PA
said by meh37II :

I'm still hopeful (silly me) that something useful will come from white-spaces... useful, and [relatively] cheap.
Haven't you heard, if those who are making up this National Broadband Plan get their way at least 25 of the remaining 49 television channels as well the equivalent of 100 analog television channels of other prime spectrum will be auctioned (undoubtedly to AT&T and Verizon Wireless) for spectrum licenses and there won't be any room anywhere for white spaces. The wireless phone industry already has over 500 MHz of spectrum while the television industry now has less than 300 MHz (some of that shared) so guess who the real bandwidth hogs are?


knightmb
Everybody Lies

join:2003-12-01
Franklin, TN
reply to Lazlow
said by Lazlow:

Wireless will be an option in some areas but in a lot of areas it is just a no go. If you look at the way houses were built (geographically) in the area I mentioned, you will see that most of the homes were built in valleys. This means they loose their line of sight and wireless does not work. The reason the houses are built in these valleys is due to the wind(1 tree per square mile is common, so nothing to stop the wind) and lightning (if the house is in the valley it is not the highest thing around).
That's not an issue anymore, as a person who to runs (2) wireless ISP companies I can say the problem has already been solved and a solution is already being implemented. But this isn't the place to get into a long technical discussion as to why or how because that's exactly what the competition wants to know.
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