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KodiacZiller
Premium
join:2008-09-04
73368
kudos:2
reply to caffeinator

Re: top 5 safest and most secure email providers ?

said by caffeinator:

Yup. You don't own the pipes, they do.
Anyone can own the pipes. Most communication on the net is not encrypted. Anyone can sniff the packets if they are in the right position.

The answer is to use strong encryption to stop the snooping, and the best way to do that, where e-mail is concerned, is to use PGP/GPG. Create an RSA key pair of at least 2048 bits and you're ready to go.
--
Getting people to stop using windows is more or less the same as trying to get people to stop smoking tobacco products. They dont want to change; they are happy with slowly dying inside. -- munky99999


DataRiker
Premium
join:2002-05-19
00000

1 edit
said by KodiacZiller:

said by caffeinator:

Yup. You don't own the pipes, they do.
Anyone can own the pipes. Most communication on the net is not encrypted. Anyone can sniff the packets if they are in the right position.

The answer is to use strong encryption to stop the snooping, and the best way to do that, where e-mail is concerned, is to use PGP/GPG. Create an RSA key pair of at least 2048 bits and you're ready to go.
This seems the best bet. 2048 seems a bit over kill though. Not sure about this but isn't over a certain bit illegal for "communication"?


KodiacZiller
Premium
join:2008-09-04
73368
kudos:2
said by DataRiker:

This seems the best bet. 2048 seems a bit over kill though. Not sure about this but isn't over a certain bit illegal for "communication"?
Perhaps in repressive nations, but not in America. The USA does have silly export laws regarding encryption, but those don't apply to *using* encryption here. This is how they got Phillip Zimmerman (creator of PGP) back in the early 90's -- they threatened him with prosecution for sending "munitions" overseas. The govt. was not happy that he was giving the rest of the world access to strong encryption.

And 2048 bits is basically considered the normal key size now. It's not recommended to go below that if creating new asymmetric keys. if you're using 1024 bit keys, it is time to upgrade as it probably wont be too long before 1024 bits is factored in public.

I think many people get confused by asymmetric vs. symmetric key sizes. Remember that symmetric keys will have smaller key sizes for the same amount of security. Therefore, 128 bit AES is about equal to 3072 bit RSA (according to NIST).
--
Getting people to stop using windows is more or less the same as trying to get people to stop smoking tobacco products. They dont want to change; they are happy with slowly dying inside. -- munky99999


DataRiker
Premium
join:2002-05-19
00000

2 edits
If your absolutely paranoid set up a short cipher with a friend, they are uncrackable ( assuming the key is longer than the message )