dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
5573
share rss forum feed


icex
Premium
join:2004-05-22
USA
Reviews:
·DIRECTV
·Frontier Communi..

Credit card fraud activity

Just got the credit card bill in for gander mountain on dads account and theres a charge from CONTINEN from MANKATO MN.

We dont know what it is and the card is never used. The bill is $847.10. Anyone ever heard of CONTINEN or had it on their bill?
--
The Gun News Blog, the latest information on the firearm industry.

gregz

join:2009-10-01

1 edit
Did you ever think about calling the company that the card is issued through, instead of asking here?

To answer your question Orbitz tickets should show up as [airlines] Mankata, MN. Orbitz acts as an agent, not a reseller, and any refund needs to go through Orbitz. Travel agents act as resellers when you purchase a air/land package or charter flights.

»www.flyertalk.com/forum/archive/···643.html

It would be a Continental ticket purchase.


swintec
Premium,VIP
join:2003-12-19
Alfred, ME
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·VoicePulse
·Sprint Mobile Br..
·RapidVPS
reply to icex
A quick Google brings up Continental Auctioneers School in Mankato, MN. Why not just call up the card company and dispute it if your dad didnt do the charge? Pretty straightforward process these days.
--
Usenet Block Accounts | Unlimited Accounts


icex
Premium
join:2004-05-22
USA
He won't be home for a few days, just trying to gather some information for him when he gets back.

gregz

join:2009-10-01
said by icex:

He won't be home for a few days, just trying to gather some information for him when he gets back.
I would let him deal with it. You will end up getting the "pampered butt syndrome." That is, being told that he will take care of it, and for you to mind your business.


icex
Premium
join:2004-05-22
USA
Reviews:
·DIRECTV
·Frontier Communi..
Well we found out what it was anyway. It was continental airlines. Somebodys bought $800 worth of airfare on my dads name and card. Their getting the fbi involved and so forth.
--
The Gun News Blog, the latest information on the firearm industry.

gregz

join:2009-10-01
Hopefully it does not follow your father when he tries to actually fly next time. As for finding out who flew on that ticket, it will not be hard for the fed's to find out from PAX records, which they get when you purchase, check in, send cargo, etc.

MGD
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-31
kudos:9

1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to icex
said by icex:

... Somebodys bought $800 worth of airfare on my dads name and card. Their getting the fbi involved and so forth.
Kudos to gregz See Profile for the correct ID of the billing descriptor. That form of card fraud is a common event, and due to the amount and frequency, unlikely to generate interest from the FBI. Assuming you eliminate family and/or friends from the equation, then I can almost guarantee you that the flight has already taken place. Do you per chance know the departure / destination details ? foreign or domestic?. The usual tactic for this fraud is to buy either an instant same day flight, or, fly within a few days ticket. The event is usually over before the victim can notice and dispute the charges. It is important to call the number on the back of the card as soon as airline fraud charges are noticed. That way the flight can be canceled ahead of time.

While the culprit or a friend may be the actual flyer, fake id can also be used. Sometimes the flyer is the victim of an online ticket scam sale where the culprit sells a discounted ticket charged to a victim's card, as a way to launder charges for cash. To complete that online purchase they should have needed the card holder's name and address, and possibly the 3 digit security code. Though the transaction could have been completed over the phone. Phishing emails are one of many methods used to obtain the victim's card data.

MGD


icex
Premium
join:2004-05-22
USA
Reviews:
·DIRECTV
·Frontier Communi..
reply to icex
Dad does not fly. He was in a plane crash when he was 17 and has never since been in a plane, which can you blame him?

As far as I know the charge is being removed and the authorities are involved and charges are being filed.
--
The Gun News Blog, the latest information on the firearm industry.


Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
Premium,VIP
join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
kudos:18
said by icex:

the authorities are involved and charges are being filed.
Against who? Do you know the perp?
--
What’s the point of owning a supercar if you can’t scare yourself stupid from time to time?


icex
Premium
join:2004-05-22
USA
No. They said its easy to find out who in this situation though.


removed
Premium,VIP
join:2002-02-08
Houston, TX
kudos:41
said by icex:

No. They said its easy to find out who in this situation though.
Sounds like a lot of smoke being blown around. $847.10 isn't a lot of money when it comes to fraudulent credit card charges... it definitely won't get "the fbi" involved.

Either way, it's nice to see that your dad was able to get this taken care of.
--
irc.removed.us - #dslr


rzaruba

join:2000-08-04


Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
Premium,VIP
join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
kudos:18
Your link requires a membership.



broccoli

join:2007-11-29
Portland, OR
said by Doctor Olds:

Your link requires a membership.
Probably because you configured your browser to reject cookies. Try using a web proxy. Works for me.


Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
Premium,VIP
join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
kudos:18
said by broccoli:

said by Doctor Olds:

Your link requires a membership.
Probably because you configured your browser to reject cookies. Try using a web proxy. Works for me.
FYI, using a web proxy isn't using your cookies, it is using the web proxy cookies instead.
--
What’s the point of owning a supercar if you can’t scare yourself stupid from time to time?

broccoli

join:2007-11-29
Portland, OR
said by Doctor Olds:

FYI, using a web proxy isn't using your cookies, it is using the web proxy cookies instead.
Which is precisely the point.

MGD
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-31
kudos:9

1 recommendation

reply to rzaruba
That is another story about the FTC action against less than 10% of the Devbil Organized Crime Syndicate: »Ebook websites, fraud charges, Devbill/DigitalAge/Pluto

said by nytimes.com :
..... The suit, filed in March by the Federal Trade Commission, contends that over at least four years, scammers placed more than $10 million in bogus charges on consumers’ credit and debit cards. Then, the suit says, they moved the money to bank accounts in Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Bulgaria, Cyprus and Kyrgyzstan. The suit was filed in United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois....

In four years the total cost is north of $250 Million ($.25 billion), the fraud has operated unfettered for 10 years, since at least 2000.

said by nytimes.com :
The scammers evaded detection by keeping each charge under $10 and stealing from each cardholder only once, spreading the theft across more than a million cardholders, the suit says.

Totally wrong, they hit cards repeatedly, but there could be one two or even three months in between. No one has looked at the big picture. A victim who never noticed, had 19 charges over a 2 year period.

said by nytimes.com :
“No one has appeared to defend the companies,” said Steven M. Wernikoff, a trade commission staff lawyer overseeing the case.

Really, Seriously ?? you were expecting them to show up?

said by nytimes.com :
When the commission filed a motion to seize the United States assets of the companies, less than $100,000 was recovered. It hopes to recover sums transferred abroad, but Mr. Wernikoff says that “it’s going to take some time.”

Not a chance for recovery, after they switched from using Inowest, Midtown, etc, all divisions of Fethard Finance aka fethard.biz aka ChronoPay, all the funds are withdrawn in cash on the same day that it arrives by OCS local mules. Tested on numerous occasions at various bank drops over the years. Money is taken within hours, very coordinated, even tried a sting set up to get some wired back:»Re: Ebook websites, fraud charges, Devbill/DigitalAge/Pluto In one bank drop for wires in Santo Domingo, in the Dominican Republic, bank confirmed the business wire drop account which was opened by a local Taxi Driver was cleaned out in cash after each inbound wire from the US. When that particular wiring drop was rolled, the said taxi driver account holder disappeared and cannot be found anywhere since. Somehow I doubt he voluntarily went on an extended vacation.

Pavel Vrublevsky, CEO of ChronoPay, knows where many $$ millions of the card fraud laundering proceeds went to after arriving at Inowest, Midtown, etc. They were used for well over two years as the central and sole laundering conduit of the OCS. I asked Pavel many times to tell me where the card fraud proceeds money went to after it arrived at Fethard's sub companies. Pavel promised to get the data from his Russian offices on multiple occasions and give me the information. Despite the promises he never turned over any information. He is one person who knows where $$$ millions of the card fraud laundering proceeds went to during 2005 to 2008, after it arrived in eastern European and central Asian bank accounts under Fethard's aka fethard.biz control.

said by nytimes.com :
Most of the fraudulent charges that appeared on victims’ statements were for $9, but at different times, charges of just 20 cents were favored, Mr. Wernikoff said. Maybe the scammers should have stuck with $9: “There were more complaints about the 20-cent charges because they looked really odd,” he said.

The FTC and the Boston Times article "Mysterious credit card charge may have hit millions of users" »www.boston.com/business/personal···f_users/ mis diagnosed and got it wrong. The GFDL and other accounts which were set by the OCS to ping and validate cards. The $.17 to $.27 amounts were not intended as fraud charges per se, the OCS was forced to hit them with tiny amounts to cover the processing of "Ping tests". prior to this the OCS used to hack into small business merchant accounts, many were PayPal, and over a weekend would run many thousands of "pre authorizations" against card databases in order to validate the card data before running them through their own fraud laundering accounts for the $10.

The small business hacked accounts would get a bill for several thousand $$ for the pre auth, a pre auth costs ~ $.15 to $.30. For years that was the ideal method since pre auths roll off the card after 24 to 48 hours. Victims would never know the card was tested unless the checked online and saw the pre auth & pending. It took a while but processors eventually caught on and all merchant accounts now have an auto pre auth limit. If the systems detects pre auths coming in from any merchant account, it will block pre auths after 20 0r 30 sequential submits, the account will have to then be manually reset after a call is made to a merchant. That change killed the OCS multi year tactic of hacking into vendor accounts. For years Authorize.net only required an Account ID, not even a password to submit pre auths.

The millions of card accounts hit with the .17 to .25 charges were actually pings to test the card, an amount about equal to the cost of the processing. They were not intended to be revenue generating. As like several other events over the years where the OCS screws up using a dumb tactic, it made national media headlines. However the FTC and other media have mistakenly identified this as a tiny intentional revenue generating charge, it was not. They were validating cards, using the only way left to do it.

said by nytimes.com :
The scheme depended upon the scammers persuading banks that they had a legitimate business so that they could secure merchant accounts through which the credit card charges were routed, the suit says; false storefronts were set up on the Web, pretending to sell electronics or office supplies, in case a bank investigated.

Absolutely no persuasion is necessary, merchant accounts are commodity items. Every one of the many hundreds of accounts that I have examined had at least one, if not multiple glaring paperwork inconsistencies. An analogy Like a Jane Smith from Boston applying for an Auto Loan, and submitting a title of a vehicle registered to a Tom Doeman in Texas, and getting approved.

said by nytimes.com :
“One thing that the banks can do a better job at is vetting merchants much more carefully,” said Avivah Litan, an analyst at Gartner Research. “That’s been a weak spot for many years.”
How about just "vetting", minimally even... How about just even once detecting $40,000 a month being wired to high risk countries from a business account, where 100% of those proceeds came from a merchant account where 30% of the charges were against the bank's own customers. An activity that is a bulls eye for mandated SAR (Suspicious Activity Report) and FINCEN filings.

said by nytimes.com :
Wells Fargo deserves credit for checking merchant references that helped uncover the problem. The perpetrators used stolen identities, with names, Social Security numbers and addresses of seemingly random individuals, the suit says.

Daniel Fuchs, a deputy attorney general in California, was surprised to receive a call one day from Wells Fargo about a merchant account application filed in his name. (When you steal identities, it might be best to stay away from the staff at the attorney general’s office.)

Kudos goes to Wells Fargo !!

said by nytimes.com :
By law, consumers are liable for no more than $50 in fraudulent charges on a credit card ...

ABSOLUTELY NOT TRUE !! Consumers are liable for $0 by law in these cases. Consumers are only liable for the first $50 if their CREDIT CARD is STOLEN and is used before they have not reported it. In these cases consumer's CARDS are NOT STOLEN they still have them. THEIR CARD DATA IS STOLEN.

said by nytimes.com :
If a credit card is physically swiped in the transaction, the bank that issued the card is on the hook for fraudulent charges. If it is a phone or Internet purchase — called a card-not-present transaction — the bank that hosted the merchant account that received the ill-gotten charges must make restitution, said Ms. Litan, the Gartner analyst.

That means the bank that issues credit cards has little motivation to be greatly concerned about online fraud. Lisa B. Westermann, a spokeswoman for Wells Fargo, said that her bank used numerous measures to prevent fraud but could not discuss them because “doing so might compromise our ability to prevent/stop fraud.”

Well it is not exactly like any bank is doing a roaring great job at catching this 10 year fraud operation.

said by nytimes.com :
In the government’s narrative of events, the scammers in the Illinois case shrewdly understood how little information was provided to cardholders on their statements. A one-time mystery charge of $9 would be met with a shrug, about a million times.

A shrug, maybe for a significant number, I guess you do not read the multiple complaint boards much, many thousands of victims do complain.

said by nytimes.com :
... Micro fraud, macro returns.


Returns !!! Surely you Jest .... it has never gone away in ten years....it has never even taken a vacation.... pay attention !!.

MGD


Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
Premium,VIP
join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
kudos:18
reply to broccoli
If you say so, but your assumption about my browser was incorrect as it is set to accept cookies so there is another factor involved.



MGD
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-31
kudos:9

1 edit
said by Doctor Olds:

..... as it is set to accept cookies so there is another factor involved.
It may also have something to do with tracking existing nytimes.com cookies and how many visits you have made already. If I recall correctly I ran across that problem in the past, and noticed a correlation between how many articles I had already read, and then getting hit up to join and being blocked. Did you by chance have an existing nyt cookie/s, and would deleting it allow the article to display?.

MGD


Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
Premium,VIP
join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
kudos:18
Yes, I had an existing NYT cookie for a while. I'll try your suggestion. Thanks!