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clickie8

join:2005-05-22
Monroe, MI

1 recommendation

The Consumer is in Charge

This scenario has been bantered about in broadband provider trade magazines for the past 18 months. These people are being pitched by all sorts of schemes to increase revenue.

It is true that the absolute dream of telcos and cablecos is this kind of pricing arrangement, the consumer won't accept it. Doing the math on the "Facebook tier" on average broadband consumption, that's an internet bill approaching $100.

They'll attempt all sorts of schemes at fleecing the consumer until the consumer revolts.


Kamus

@calpop.com
Does anyone else here think that ISP's are simply trying to delay the inevitable?

Sure, they might get away with this crap for a while, and actually delay the demise of stupid data plans such as the examples given here, and a world where we need to pay for "voice" and "TV" from these people.

But if it's really true that the cost of bandwidth for backbones halves every 9 months, and will continue to do so for a while... they're just doomed.
At some point it will get cheap enough so that new players enter the arena, and offer compelling data only flat rates.

I mean, if it wasn't for the "last mile" problem, we could already take advantage of all this unused bandwidth.
So i guess what we need is for prices to drop for "last mile" deployment a lot more before we can take advantage of all the bandwidth they'd rather never have us get.

Wireless of course is a different story altogether, and it looks like a billionaire only business for quite some time.

But really, is it hard to imagine a 10 bucks 1 gigabit wired connections by 2020 if prices keep dropping like a rock?

I'm interested to know people's opinions about this subject. Because i'm a bit optimistic on the future of the internet. I think that once prices come down enough, we could very well see a surge of new ways to connect to that network that our current last mile land lords won't give us access to.

I dare say, that these monopolies will come crumbling down once bandwidth gets cheap enough.

sonicmerlin

join:2009-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:1

1 recommendation

Bandwidth has almost never been the barrier to entry for other companies, except out in remote rural areas where there's no middle mile competition.

The issue has always been initial outlay of capital to lay down the lines, which is a HUGE expense, compounded by the necessity of competing with an incumbent who can easily price you out of the market.

chances14

join:2010-03-03
Michigan
reply to Kamus
said by Kamus :

Does anyone else here think that ISP's are simply trying to delay the inevitable?

Sure, they might get away with this crap for a while, and actually delay the demise of stupid data plans such as the examples given here, and a world where we need to pay for "voice" and "TV" from these people.

But if it's really true that the cost of bandwidth for backbones halves every 9 months, and will continue to do so for a while... they're just doomed.
At some point it will get cheap enough so that new players enter the arena, and offer compelling data only flat rates.

I mean, if it wasn't for the "last mile" problem, we could already take advantage of all this unused bandwidth.
So i guess what we need is for prices to drop for "last mile" deployment a lot more before we can take advantage of all the bandwidth they'd rather never have us get.

Wireless of course is a different story altogether, and it looks like a billionaire only business for quite some time.

But really, is it hard to imagine a 10 bucks 1 gigabit wired connections by 2020 if prices keep dropping like a rock?

I'm interested to know people's opinions about this subject. Because i'm a bit optimistic on the future of the internet. I think that once prices come down enough, we could very well see a surge of new ways to connect to that network that our current last mile land lords won't give us access to.

I dare say, that these monopolies will come crumbling down once bandwidth gets cheap enough.

i'm not optimistic at all. until all these monopolies of ISP's are gone, prices will never go down nor will they feel the need to expand or upgrade their networks

Sammer

join:2005-12-22
Canonsburg, PA
reply to Kamus
said by Kamus :

But if it's really true that the cost of bandwidth for backbones halves every 9 months, and will continue to do so for a while... they're just doomed.
At some point it will get cheap enough so that new players enter the arena, and offer compelling data only flat rates.

I mean, if it wasn't for the "last mile" problem, we could already take advantage of all this unused bandwidth.
So i guess what we need is for prices to drop for "last mile" deployment a lot more before we can take advantage of all the bandwidth they'd rather never have us get.

If unregulated corporations insist on schemes that rip-off consumers someday voters will insist on the government funding a competitive fiber optic based last mile that will be the feared dumb pipe!


WHT

join:2010-03-26
Rosston, TX
kudos:5
reply to Kamus
said by Kamus :

So i guess what we need is for prices to drop for "last mile" deployment

Actually prices are going to go up by at least twice as much, and at least a month wait time for installations.

2.4 GHz is a RF waste land with a dozen APs on 200 foot towers or 120 foot water towers, all within a few miles of each other, and then you have the -70 dBm noise floor from SOHO wireless gear. 5.8 GHz is getting to be the same way, but at least the more tighter beamwidth antennas is helping; as well as 200 watts for the PtP backhaul links.

The next stage is 3.65 GHz and the equipment costs twice as much and each user's radio has to be licensed (it takes about a month for the FCC to process your application).