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Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable

2 recommendations

Thought I'd pass along this handy tip...

Before trying to start that string trimmer you bought last year... for the first time this season, it really makes it easy if you remember to use fresh gas/oil mix, clean/replace the air cleaner, and check and clean the sparkplug... and disengage the kill switch!!! Need I really say any more?!?!?!

My next door neighbor is still laughing!!!

--
Keep your eye on the ball, your shoulder to the wheel, your nose to the grindstone, and your ear to the ground. Now, try to work in that position!!!


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
So, you finally figured it out, eh?


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI

1 recommendation

reply to Pacrat
You know, I found that very same tip was helpful to me when I ran my generator for its seasonal exercise. Made a world of difference in how easily it started.


stev32k
Premium
join:2000-04-27
Mobile, AL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Mediacom
reply to Pacrat
I had the same problem with my leaf blower. I pulled on the starter until my arm gave out and was ready to take it to the repair shop. Then I finally realized the kill switch was in the stop position. Turn the switch to run and it started on the first pull.


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
reply to Pacrat
Believe me... it's more than a little comforting to see that I'm not the only idiot that pulled that stunt! I've made up my mind that from now on, I'm going to reset the switch to the run position as soon as the engine dies when I'm done running the damn thing. Either that... or I'm going to run it out of gas every time I use it!!!
--
Keep your eye on the ball, your shoulder to the wheel, your nose to the grindstone, and your ear to the ground. Now, try to work in that position!!!


leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
Leaving the kill switch in the "kill" position is a good idea when there is any chance that children might try to play with it. Of course, letting it run out of gas is an even safer option
--
Got some spare cpu cycles ? Join Team Helix or Team Starfire!


SandShark
Long may you run
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-23
Santa Fe, TX
kudos:3
reply to Pacrat
They don't call it the "kill" switch for no reason. Don't ask me how I know.


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
said by SandShark:

They don't call it the "kill" switch for no reason. Don't ask me how I know.

My 10 Hp, pull-start generator damn near killed me until I noticed the "Engine Run" switch, set to the off position, staring me in the face.


GadgetsRme
RIP lilhurricane
Premium
join:2002-01-30
Canon City, CO
reply to Pacrat
That tip applies to snow blowers, too. My 82 year old father very gleefully pointed it out to me last November when I was over at his place to fire it up to make sure it was ready for the winter.
--
Gadgets


UHF
All static, all day, Forever
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
reply to Pacrat
Thanks for the tip! This has happened to me, too, and I'll try to keep it in mind in the future before pulling the recoil rope 165 times.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to Pacrat
Thanks for the reminder, but I probably won't remember.


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4

1 recommendation

reply to Pacrat
I did this with a chainsaw. Except in an even dumber way. I was using it when it quite. Tried to restart, nope. Went to add gas, it had plenty. Try to restart again. Still nope. Carried it all the way back to the garage before I saw I had bumped the kill switch while I was using it.


cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to leibold
said by leibold:

Leaving the kill switch in the "kill" position is a good idea when there is any chance that children might try to play with it. Of course, letting it run out of gas is an even safer option

If any kid is old enough to get my string trimmer/mower/snow blower/chain saw running by playing with it, they are old enough to start using it. Electric start devices aside, I don't think any gas device I own would be able to be started by a kid playing with them.


norton

join:2005-08-03
Howard City, MI
reply to robbin
my wife wrote on our leaf blower with a fine point permanent marker - off/on and it works. the no word "o" "-" just wasn't getting the job done.


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
That's like the shop vac in my work van. It was passed down to me by a senior technician. He wrote "suck" and "blow" near the inlet and outlet. It is nice, too, as the hose doesn't stay attached when stored, and I can never remeber what orifice is which.


chmod
Premium
join:2000-12-12
Lockport, IL
reply to Pacrat
I was mf'ing my snowblower 2 years ago. Alas it had the illusive "key" in the off position. I will reluctantly mention it may have been after a few beers also.
--
Some people are like Slinkies. Not really good for anything, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.


rockotman
...Blown On The Steel Breeze
Emerging Research
join:2000-08-06
DSotM
kudos:2
reply to Pacrat
My experience has always been that the last item you listed is usually the only culprit that prevents starting.
--
Shine on you crazy diamond...

sparks

join:2001-07-08
Little Rock, AR
reply to Pacrat
yea and with the quality of gas now, its best to use premium.
My mower would cough and sputter on high grass and and my trimmer and blower were hard to start. I purchased some premium to try and not one problem after that.


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
reply to rockotman
No shit, Sherlock!!!!


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
reply to sparks
My dealer advised me to use, at least, 89 octane fuel for my implements (trimmer, leaf blower, chainsaw, mower, tractor, and snow-blower), and I've been pleasantly surprised how much easier it is to get things started since I've been doing that. Everything seems to run much better on the higher octane. But, so far, I've not seen the need to go all the way to pemium. Not that I don't agree with you about not using regular gasoline... it's just that full premium seems to be a bit of overkill to me. However, whatever works for you is good.
--
Keep your eye on the ball, your shoulder to the wheel, your nose to the grindstone, and your ear to the ground. Now, try to work in that position!!!


rockotman
...Blown On The Steel Breeze
Emerging Research
join:2000-08-06
DSotM
kudos:2
reply to Pacrat


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
reply to Pacrat
One of these fine days, I'm going to have to take the snow-blower attachment off my Cub and mount the mower deck. I'm pretty sure we're beyond the risk of a major snowstorm.
--
Keep your eye on the ball, your shoulder to the wheel, your nose to the grindstone, and your ear to the ground. Now, try to work in that position!!!


rockotman
...Blown On The Steel Breeze
Emerging Research
join:2000-08-06
DSotM
kudos:2
You haven't cut yet?

Your yard must be a jungle!

I've been cutting weekly since late March, and I am only about 50 miles away.

p.s., regarding the 89 octane gas... my mower, which I bought back in 2007 and my Swisher, which I bought 2 years ago, both indicate that 89 or higher octane should be used because of the ethanol content prevalent in most fuels today.
--
Shine on you crazy diamond...


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
Oh... I've mowed, and mowed, and mowed this year... about twice a week. I've just been using my walk-behind LawnBoy to mow with. I rarely use the Cub to mow... I use the deck mostly in the fall to collect the leaves. The docs are preaching at me to exercise more, and so I mow fairly frequently and get some walking in to boot. My daughter doesn't like to use the LawnBoy to mow with, so I probably should mount the deck so she can use the Cub. That way, maybe she'll cut her own damn grass.

We've got so many "nooks & crannies" at my place that I still have to either use the trimmer or the small mower to trim after I mow with the big deck on the Cub, that, timewise, it's almost as fast to just use the walk-behind in the first place. Every once in awhile, I do mow with the Cub but it's usually when I'm in a big hurry to beat the rain, or when it has been so wet the grass gets ahead of me. But that doesn't happen very often so the Cub sits pretty much all summer. The Cub deck is 50" which is really too big for the yard I have, but that's what came with the tractor so I didn't bother with trying to "trade down" on deck size.
--
Keep your eye on the ball, your shoulder to the wheel, your nose to the grindstone, and your ear to the ground. Now, try to work in that position!!!


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to Pacrat
Octane rating or octane number is a standard measure of the performance of a motor or aviation fuel. The higher the octane number, the more compression the fuel can withstand before detonating. In broad terms, fuels with a higher octane rating are used in high-compression engines that generally have higher performance.

I doubt if trimmers, blowers chainsaws etc have enough compression to even notice the Octane of the fuel. Consumer Reports has said over and over again if the owners manual doesn't call for high octane gas because of the compression ratio then buying it is a waste of money.


supergas

@apexcovantage.com
I too doubt the mower cares about the octane but, at least around here super/premium/hi-octane is ethanol free. While regular and mid grade "may contain up-to 10% ethanol." That's the only reason I use it in my mower and trimmer. I'd like to think by now small engine manufactures have learned to deal with ethanol but it's cheap insurance.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
said by supergas :

I too doubt the mower cares about the octane but, at least around here super/premium/hi-octane is ethanol free. While regular and mid grade "may contain up-to 10% ethanol." That's the only reason I use it in my mower and trimmer. I'd like to think by now small engine manufactures have learned to deal with ethanol but it's cheap insurance.

I don't know where you are but here all grades are labeled 10 percent but that varies all over the place from 5 percent to 20 percent. The 20 percent is causing all kinds of grief to those buying it.


UHF
All static, all day, Forever
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
reply to Pacrat
Around here (Iowa) all "regular" gas is 87 octane, and "super" is 89, but is 10% ethanol. I use the 87 octane in my Cub Cadet with a Kohler engine.


stev32k
Premium
join:2000-04-27
Mobile, AL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Mediacom
reply to Pacrat
I have a Husqvarna back pack blower that specifies a minimum 89 Octane and recommends 93 octane. So I started using 93 in all my 2-stroke engines and it does make a difference. The string trimmer and hedge trimmer turn up a noticeably higher RPM with the higher octane gas.

I've also started using fuel stabilizer in all the engines. I don't use the chain saw very often and it was very hard to start after setting for a month or so. With the stabilizer it starts up on the second or third pull. The same is true for the pressure washer. I only use it two or three times a year and it used to be a real pain trying to start it after setting for a long time. With the stabilizer added it starts on the second pull almost every time (if I remember to put the run/stop switch in the run position).


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

2 edits
REGULAR VERSUS PREMIUM GASOLINE

Regular Gasoline Has As Much Merit As Premium Gasoline

There is little difference in energy content of regular versus premium gasoline. They both contain about 111,400 British Thermal Units of energy per gallon.

Using the fuel stabilizer is a good practice. Been using it for years with good results. Right now I'm using fuel I mixed last fall in my trimmer and blower.

From Scientific American:

Fact or Fiction?: Premium Gasoline Delivers Premium Benefits to Your Car

Exploding the myth that premium gasoline delivers better performance in the average automobile

In most of the U.S., regular gas has an octane rating of 87, midgrade gas is 89, and premium is 91 or 92. (Octane ratings are lower in the mountain west due to the effects of thin air on internal combustion.) Contrary to widespread belief, the octane rating doesn't indicate how much power the fuel delivers; all grades of gasoline contain roughly the same amount of heat energy. Rather, a higher octane rating means the fuel is less likely to cause your engine to knock or ping. Knock, also known as detonation, occurs when part of the fuel-air mixture in one or more of your car's cylinders ignites spontaneously due to compression, independent of the combustion initiated by the spark plug. (The ideal gas law tells us that a gas heats up when compressed.) Instead of a controlled burn, you get what amounts to an explosion--not a good thing for your engine. To avoid this, high-octane gas is formulated to burn slower than regular, making it less likely to ignite without benefit of spark.

What's the difference between premium and regular gas?