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davidhoffman
Premium
join:2009-11-19
Warner Robins, GA
kudos:3
reply to me1212

Re: DirecTV offering ViaSat and HughesNet Broadband

Exede is based on a new satellite that was put into orbit. The new satellite, ViaSat-1, is described as having more data transmission capability than all other existing commercial internet access satellites combined. It has allowed for the possibility of a 10x increase in data transmission rates for satellite internet customers and the addition of customers who could not get service due to the overloaded spot beams of existing satellites used by Wild Blue.

No, ping times will not go down. A data packet dealing with a 46,000 mile round trip is going to have some cost in terms of time. As top executives at ViaSat have said, gamers are not who the system was built for. Ping sensitive applications will not like this Exede service anymore than they liked the old WildBlue service.



Simba7
I Void Warranties

join:2003-03-24
Billings, MT
said by davidhoffman:

No, ping times will not go down. A data packet dealing with a 46,000 mile round trip is going to have some cost in terms of time.

Yep, can't beat the laws of physics. Just ask LightSquared.

..unless someone develops subspace communications..

me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
reply to davidhoffman
Was any of the broadband stimulus money spent on this? I certainly hope not, if its not being spent to decrease latency so sat internet then there is no reason to spend federal money on the crap tier of internet. This is just me personal feelings on it, but the money should be spent on wireless or dsl or stuff solutions that don't give the people what amounts to castrated internet, that wont help our problem. I know how bad it truly is, 2000ms ping time, can't use it for anything for than browsing or file transfers. Gaming and VoIP/skype, and any time sensitive stuff(which a lot of business use) is out of the question with it still.

Yeah I know I sound like I'm going really hard on the sat internet, but I had it for two year, two horrid horrid years.


Peachtreeman

@verizon.net
reply to Simba7
Quantum Entanglement is the only faster source of communication known to man. Distance isn't a factor nor is interference. Problem is that we've only successfully transmitting a Quantum Entangled particle about 600KM and it takes quite a bit of "not friendly to space" tech.

Maybe in 20-25 years it'll microwave tech.

davidhoffman
Premium
join:2009-11-19
Warner Robins, GA
kudos:3
reply to me1212
Again, the service is not for latency sensitive applications, and the top executives at ViaSat have stated that emphatically. You cannot change the laws of physics. If someone wants to create a super version of the Iridium 66 low orbit satellite network, you might get lower ping times. Good luck finding the trillions of dollars that would cost. Not even Google could finance that.

The ability to get news, market data, educational information, health information, medical information, and similar content that is not latency sensitive, is still very important to businesses and residents in dial-up only areas. Gaming, Skype, and video conferencing are nice to have features that have less priority than more basic World Wide Web functions for dial-up users.

Most of the Federal Stimulus money for broadband went to fiber optic backbone and middle mile projects. But in order to quickly solve some connectivity issues in very remote rural areas they decided that microwave and satellite offerings had to be part of the mix of solutions. DSL would not work in some areas because the distance to the central office was too great. In order to reduce the distance sufficiently, you would have to run a very long fiber connection to a remote DSLAM. The cost of that, in some cases, was too large on a per potential subscriber basis, and it would take too long to install. Cellular connections providing the same capability as satellite would have required very large antennas and bidirectional amplifiers. Steerable 60ft diameter dish antennas are not inexpensive to build or operate.

Satellite based broadband is not for every potential internet user. It does help some people who live or work in remote areas, similar to the original Big Ugly Dish C-band satellite television subscribers, who could not get regular Over The Air broadcast television because they were too far from the transmitting antenna.