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openvz_ca

join:2008-12-13
canada

1 recommendation

reply to InvalidError

Re: World IPv6 Day

said by InvalidError:

said by openvz_ca:

Content needs to be ready before the end users.

Content is irrelevant, any content can travel just as easily over IPv4 and IPv6, IPv6 does not change anything fundamental there.

The main things IPv6 is missing is full support on CPE, broadband routers and some network edge equipment in the carriers' networks (mostly equipment over 4 years old) is where the real problems are.

Once full IPv6 support becomes available from end to end, most people won't even notice that they have been switched over.

If you can't get what you want over IPv6, then there's no point.

Unless you want to force end users to be dual stacked until the end of time. The migration path should be to eventually end up with only IPv6. No sense doing it if the end result doesn't get rid of one protocol.

As for CPE routers etc... Most of these problems can be fixed with firmware/software updates anyways. It's not like CPE routers are ASIC based anyways.

Linux, Windows and Mac OS X have supported v6 in a stable fashion for years now.

Bell, Rogers & Telus should have IPv6 enabled to end users at this point.

InvalidError

join:2008-02-03
kudos:5

1 recommendation

said by openvz_ca:

If you can't get what you want over IPv6, then there's no point.

There is a point: avoid the need for double-NAT at the ISP level, replacing it by a 4to6 gateway once ISPs get to the point where they might start having to put their subscribers on CG-NAT.

said by openvz_ca:

As for CPE routers etc... Most of these problems can be fixed with firmware/software updates anyways.

They may be upgradable/fixable but for now, many of them still require manual setup for IPv6 which is counter-productive for adoption.

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
said by InvalidError:

They may be upgradable/fixable but for now, many of them still require manual setup for IPv6 which is counter-productive for adoption.

You have to configure new CPE anyway.

Most of the manual setup I've seen is because ISPs do not have their side setup properly. TSI being one such ISP.

InvalidError

join:2008-02-03
kudos:5
said by 34764170:

You have to configure new CPE anyway.

You do not need to manually setup IPv4 subnet, you get that from PPPoE or DHCP. With IPv6, many broadband routers only support manual setup.

said by 34764170:

Most of the manual setup I've seen is because ISPs do not have their side setup properly. TSI being one such ISP.

Automatic setup works fine with TSI IPv6 using Windows' dialer. Simply enable IPv6 in the dialer config and connect.

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
said by InvalidError:

You do not need to manually setup IPv4 subnet, you get that from PPPoE or DHCP. With IPv6, many broadband routers only support manual setup.

The comment was about configuring the router period. When you buy the router for the first time it has to be setup. Especially so if you're using PPPoE.

Yes and they have to be manually setup because the ISP hasn't setup their end properly.

said by InvalidError:

Automatic setup works fine with TSI IPv6 using Windows' dialer. Simply enable IPv6 in the dialer config and connect.

Exactly. An end host vs a router. Your host is using an address configured via RA. The routers need DHCPv6-PD.

That doesn't change what I said. TSI still needs to fix their end of things.

InvalidError

join:2008-02-03
kudos:5
said by 34764170:

Exactly. An end host vs a router. Your host is using an address configured via RA. The routers need DHCPv6-PD.

Route Advertisement / SLAAC works just as well for routers and hosts since if you advertise a /64 to a host, it will simply fill the remaining 64 bits using SLAAC if enabled, which it is by default. A router would simply use the subnet address to generate its WAN address (usually whatever::1) and either re-advertise the subnet on the LAN or start allocating addresses from that IPv6 subnet using local DHCP.

Routers do not need to receive their IPv6 allocation through DHCPv6. All the IPv6 papers I remember reading say RA/SLAAC prefix delegation is the preferred method in the absence of specific reasons to use DHCP such as wanting to manage static IPv6 addresses using DHCP.

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
said by InvalidError:

Route Advertisement / SLAAC works just as well for routers and hosts since if you advertise a /64 to a host, it will simply fill the remaining 64 bits using SLAAC if enabled, which it is by default. A router would simply use the subnet address to generate its WAN address (usually whatever::1) and either re-advertise the subnet on the LAN or start allocating addresses from that IPv6 subnet using local DHCP.

Routers do not need to receive their IPv6 allocation through DHCPv6. All the IPv6 papers I remember reading say RA/SLAAC prefix delegation is the preferred method in the absence of specific reasons to use DHCP such as wanting to manage static IPv6 addresses using DHCP.

I'll have to track this down to see if this has changed but the spec does not allow for RA on a router. You're not supposed to use RA on a host with more than one interface. Ya I know that's kind of strange nowadays and even end hosts can have more than one interface nowadays but that's how it was defined.

Also I didn't mean the /64 for the PPP interface. I was referring to the /56 or whatever prefix for behind the router. AFAIK RA does not propagate such prefixes anyway and that's why I'm mentioning DHCPv6-PD.

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

1 recommendation

reply to openvz_ca
said by openvz_ca:

If you can't get what you want over IPv6, then there's no point.

Unless you want to force end users to be dual stacked until the end of time. The migration path should be to eventually end up with only IPv6. No sense doing it if the end result doesn't get rid of one protocol.

As for CPE routers etc... Most of these problems can be fixed with firmware/software updates anyways. It's not like CPE routers are ASIC based anyways.

Linux, Windows and Mac OS X have supported v6 in a stable fashion for years now.

Bell, Rogers & Telus should have IPv6 enabled to end users at this point.

It's true. A good amount of content needs to be available first and that's what World IPv6 Launch will provide with the likes of Google/Youtube, Microsoft/Xbox, Yahoo, Facebook, Netflix and various other large web sites.

Personally I don't feel that the CPE issue is much of an issue anymore. Cisco/D-Link/Netgear/Apple/ZyXEL/ASUS and a few other vendors are now shipping v6 enabled routers out of the box.

relatively modern Linux distros, Windows Vista/7/2008 Server, OS X 10.7+, iOS 5.0+ have good v6 support. OS X 10.5/10.6 have some issues and lack DHCPv6 support. Android is lagging without DHCPv6 support.