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FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

Very few users care about privacy - Facebook example

Looks like very few people care about privacy, despite all the blogger press claiming otherwise. Facebook held a vote on privacy policy and virtually no one came. I voted no, but I was 1 of a very, very few who did bother to vote.

»news.yahoo.com/facebook-election···657.html

The online poll to determine which Facebook policies will be put into place on the social network closed this morning after one week of voting -- and a serious lack of user interest.

Out of 900 million users, a mere 342,632 voted on which privacy policy would govern the site. Just shy of 300,000 users voted against the policy change, while around 45,000 voted for it.

That's roughly 1 in every 2,600 users -- or 0.00038% of Facebook.

Facebook's call to action last Friday asked users to read and vote on which Statement of Rights and Responsibilities and Data Use Policy they preferred to use.

Facebook said that if the poll didn't receive at least 30% of users' votes, the company would make the decision of which privacy policy to use on its own. That means 230 million people would have had to vote during the eight-day window the poll was open.



Scatcatpdx
Fur It Up

join:2007-06-22
Portland, OR
Go figure people willfully sign up and voluntary give up their privacy to Facebook. I bet the ones who care, like me, would never sign up in the first place. I never would sign up for any social networking site.


FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
said by Scatcatpdx:

I bet the ones who care, like me, would never sign up in the first place. I never would sign up for any social networking site.

What, no large extended, geographically dispersed family and friends?

I make sure my privacy options are well set up and I can keep up on the doings of my younger relatives scattered around country and who don't communicate by voice anymore. It is a decent tool to do that.


KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK

1 recommendation

reply to FFH5
Maybe if they'd bothered to notify people. I don't use Facebook very heavily but I have been on in the last week and I didn't see any notice or email about said vote or poll.

I'm sure that's just the way they wanted it.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini


N3OGH
Yo Soy Col. "Bat" Guano
Premium
join:2003-11-11
Philly burbs
kudos:2

2 recommendations

reply to FFH5
Didn't even know this was happening.

FB did not do a good job of making it public. Why do I think that was probably intentional????
--
Petty people are disproportionally corrupted by petty power


KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK
Exactly.


Scatcatpdx
Fur It Up

join:2007-06-22
Portland, OR
reply to FFH5
I am bit of loner and anti social. The few who know me to call me on my phone or send me a e-mail.
Another thing is I ma looking for permanent work and I do not want to give my age away, that is one reason I closed my LinkedIn account.


Noah Vail
Son made my Avatar
Premium
join:2004-12-10
Lorton, VA
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Bright House

1 recommendation

reply to FFH5

.

In Obvious News Today. . .

Users who have no regard for their own privacy flock to Facebook and are eager to participate in polls.

Texas isn't big enough to contain the DUH! that accompanies that revelation.
--
The Dark Tower's Skynet evolves from 4chan.


88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness
reply to Scatcatpdx

Re: Very few users care about privacy - Facebook example

said by Scatcatpdx:

I am bit of loner and anti social. The few who know me to call me on my phone or send me a e-mail.
Another thing is I ma looking for permanent work and I do not want to give my age away, that is one reason I closed my LinkedIn account.

Don't you have to put your age on your resume or any application?


FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
said by 88615298:

said by Scatcatpdx:

I am bit of loner and anti social. The few who know me to call me on my phone or send me a e-mail.
Another thing is I ma looking for permanent work and I do not want to give my age away, that is one reason I closed my LinkedIn account.

Don't you have to put your age on your resume or any application?

No you don't. In fact if you interview someone for a job, you are not allowed to even ask about age. Federal law prohibits it and it has been that way for a long time. When I interviewed people to work for me 20 yrs ago, I was prohibited from asking that.


88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness
reply to Scatcatpdx
said by Scatcatpdx:

Go figure people willfully sign up and voluntary give up their privacy to Facebook. I bet the ones who care, like me, would never sign up in the first place. I never would sign up for any social networking site.

First of all the the "right to privacy" really refers to the government not private companies.

Second Facebook does have privacy features. If people bothered to use them there wouldn't be as many issues. Sure if you use the apps they can use all your information but they tell you that BEFORE you activate the app. And if you like your privacy don't use the apps. It's that simple.

If Facebook offered to have an ad free 100% privacy guaranteed account for $5 a month, I wonder how many of the privacy complainers would sign-up? My guess not many. Which means they don't think their privacy is worth $5 so why are the complaining?


88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness
reply to FFH5
said by FFH5:

said by 88615298:

said by Scatcatpdx:

I am bit of loner and anti social. The few who know me to call me on my phone or send me a e-mail.
Another thing is I ma looking for permanent work and I do not want to give my age away, that is one reason I closed my LinkedIn account.

Don't you have to put your age on your resume or any application?

No you don't. In fact if you interview someone for a job, you are not allowed to even ask about age. Federal law prohibits it and it has been that way for a long time. When I interviewed people to work for me 20 yrs ago, I was prohibited from asking that.

Funny any job I have applied for has an area on it for your birthdate. Some jobs actually require a minimum age. Like 14 year olds can't work at McDonald's. Kind of need a birthdate for that. Under 21 year old's can't serve alcohol in many places. Kind of need to ask for an age in those jobs. I'm pretty sure that if you put down where you went to college you have to put WHEN you graduated so they can make sure you are telling the truth. Unless you're some Doogie Howser and graduated at 12, they can tell how old you are by your graduation year.


FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
said by 88615298:

Funny any job I have applied for has an area on it for your birthdate. Some jobs actually require a minimum age. Like 14 year olds can't work at McDonald's. Kind of need a birthdate for that. Under 21 year old's can't serve alcohol in many places. Kind of need to ask for an age in those jobs. I'm pretty sure that if you put down where you went to college you have to put WHEN you graduated so they can make sure you are telling the truth. Unless you're some Doogie Howser and graduated at 12, they can tell how old you are by your graduation year.

Yes, the law is stupid in many ways. But all the anti-discrimination laws passed in Washington are pretty stupid. I couldn't ask how old someone was, but like you say, graduation dates; dates when previously employed; and just plain using my eyes could tell me how old someone was. I had to sit thru a 1 day Human Resources seminar before the company would let me interview people for a position. And IF I wanted to discriminate for my own personal reasons, I could. I just was taught how to make sure that wasn't included in comments I made on interview forms HR made me fill out. The whole thing was just 1 big game we had to play to keep the federal watchdogs happy.

slckusr
Premium
join:2003-03-17
Greenville, SC
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to N3OGH
said by N3OGH:

Didn't even know this was happening.

FB did not do a good job of making it public. Why do I think that was probably intentional????

Agree im on facebook daily and never noticed it.


skeechan
Ai Otsukaholic
Premium
join:2012-01-26
AA169|170
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to FFH5
Happy to be 1 of 4 people who still refuse to use Facebook. ^_^


workablob

join:2004-06-09
Houston, TX
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to FFH5
said by FFH5:

said by Scatcatpdx:

I bet the ones who care, like me, would never sign up in the first place. I never would sign up for any social networking site.

What, no large extended, geographically dispersed family and friends?

I make sure my privacy options are well set up and I can keep up on the doings of my younger relatives scattered around country and who don't communicate by voice anymore. It is a decent tool to do that.

Ditto.

Facebook has brought old friends back with which I would otherwise have no contact.

Dave

funny0

join:2010-12-22
reply to FFH5
said by FFH5:

Looks like very few people care about privacy, despite all the blogger press claiming otherwise. Facebook held a vote on privacy policy and virtually no one came. I voted no, but I was 1 of a very, very few who did bother to vote.

»news.yahoo.com/facebook-election···657.html

The online poll to determine which Facebook policies will be put into place on the social network closed this morning after one week of voting -- and a serious lack of user interest.

Out of 900 million users, a mere 342,632 voted on which privacy policy would govern the site. Just shy of 300,000 users voted against the policy change, while around 45,000 voted for it.

That's roughly 1 in every 2,600 users -- or 0.00038% of Facebook.

Facebook's call to action last Friday asked users to read and vote on which Statement of Rights and Responsibilities and Data Use Policy they preferred to use.

Facebook said that if the poll didn't receive at least 30% of users' votes, the company would make the decision of which privacy policy to use on its own. That means 230 million people would have had to vote during the eight-day window the poll was open.

thats cause everyone that valued privacy left faceplant
and i did it a long time ago .....
sick of it and its why its ipo was so wacked and dropped in share price so fast


workablob

join:2004-06-09
Houston, TX
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to 88615298
said by 88615298:

said by Scatcatpdx:

Go figure people willfully sign up and voluntary give up their privacy to Facebook. I bet the ones who care, like me, would never sign up in the first place. I never would sign up for any social networking site.

First of all the the "right to privacy" really refers to the government not private companies.

Second Facebook does have privacy features. If people bothered to use them there wouldn't be as many issues. Sure if you use the apps they can use all your information but they tell you that BEFORE you activate the app. And if you like your privacy don't use the apps. It's that simple.

If Facebook offered to have an ad free 100% privacy guaranteed account for $5 a month, I wonder how many of the privacy complainers would sign-up? My guess not many. Which means they don't think their privacy is worth $5 so why are the complaining?

So true. Lazy people want their privacy but can't be bothered to use the tools given them.

I don't use ANY Facebook apps because I don't feel TurnipTown or DrugWars are worth even the tiniest peek into my personal info.

Dave
--